Michaela Gamache A Midsummer Night's Dream
0 view | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Michaela Gamache
Scoop.it!

Shakespeare's sources | Source

Shakespeare's sources | Source | Michaela Gamache A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Michaela Gamache's insight:

This web article focuses on the sources Shakespeare used in creating A Midsummer Night's Dream. One of the major sources for this play was Metamorphoses,  where he got the name Titania. In this book by Ovid, the name "Titania" is used to referred to various mythological figures, like Circe and Diana, and literally means "Titan's daughter" Circe is infamous in mythology for turning men into swine, similar to what happened to Bottom.  Diana is the goddess of the moon, which relates back to the moon imagery and symbolism that appears throughout the play..

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michaela Gamache
Scoop.it!

Literary Criticism

Literary Criticism | Michaela Gamache A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Sign in with your credentials to access the EBSCOhost premium information resources provided by your subscribing institution.
Michaela Gamache's insight:

 

Within this document, author Allen Dunn analyzes what the true meaning of A Midsummer Night's Dream truly is. He starts off by talking about the views of other authors that have written criticism on this play, and separates them into two separate groups based on their opinions. After talking about that, he states his own view, which falls in the middle of his two categories he created. He believes that, because the play is presented as a dream, there are elements of both irrational dream logic and the logic of one who is awake, neither of which is more prominent that the other. I believe that this is an accurate analysis of the play. When the lovers awake after their night in the forest, they dismiss all that happens as a dream, despite the effects from the night lasting. Demetrius had a complete change of heart, but thought nothing of it. These are some of the illogical aspects associated with dreaming. However, during the night, the lovers acted as rational as could be expected to Puck's interference in their love affairs. Hermia and Helena, instead of going along with it as one in a dream would, both get incredibly angry at each other and the guys. Because of instances like this, it can't be said that dream logic dominates the play, and making Dunn's point valid.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michaela Gamache
Scoop.it!

Image

Image | Michaela Gamache A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it

Caparo, Antonio. "A Midsummer Night's Dream." A Midsummer Night's Dream. N.p., 201. Web. 16 Dec. 2014. <http://www.antoniocaparo.com/282429/878661/portfolio/a-midsummer-nights-dream>.

Michaela Gamache's insight:

This art, done by Antonio Caparo, connects directly to the play. Here we see sneaky Puck spying Titania, who sleeps among the flowers, with fairies dancing around her. Overhead it shows the moon, which is very symbolic in A Midsummer's Night Dream as a symbol of love and lunacy. In the play, the only time when Titania is said to be sleeping and has another fairy sneaking up to her is when she gets the love juice put on her eyes, making her crazy in love, and thus relating to the two major things the moon is a symbol of. This image does a great job depicting Titania in her fairy grotto,  which is described as hosting a wide array of flowers. Titania herself is depicted with an array of colors, attracting the eye and highlighting her as the focal point of the image. The bright colors and the flowers are also symbolic of how close the fairies are to nature. Puck is in the shadows, hinting that he is supposed to be hidden, which relates to his impish nature. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michaela Gamache
Scoop.it!

Historical Article

Historical Article | Michaela Gamache A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Sign in with your credentials to access the EBSCOhost premium information resources provided by your subscribing institution.
Michaela Gamache's insight:

In this historical article, author Alison Findlay provides information about Hermia, such as the origin of her name, the connotations with her name, and her physical appearance. The connotations the name "Hermia" possesses are rather negative. It is mostly associated with a very amorous woman of that namesake who seduced Aristotle away from his studies. As for the origin of the name, the name "Hermia" is the female version of the name "Hermes", the name of a Greek god. In Greek mythology, Hermes was the god of thieves and traders, and most commonly associated with speed, trickery, and cunning. Despite her physical representation to Hermes, as both are of the same stature, Hermia acts like nothing like Hermes. Even when Lysander completely abandons her, Hermia remains loyal and even pledges her vows. Throughout that scene, Hermia is also portrayed as a victim, and not as a trickster like Hermes would be. The only time her actions mirrored what Hermes would do was at the beginning, where she tried to be free from her father's control, but the overall differences makes it appear as though Shakespeare chose the name for more of an ironic purpose. She is also, through the play, seen as sweet by most around her.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michaela Gamache
Scoop.it!

Video

"Globe On Screen 2014: A Midsummer Night's Dream." YouTube. YouTube, n.d. Web. 16 Dec. 2014. <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGgsJd4_r4k&index=20>.

Michaela Gamache's insight:

In this video, taken from "Globe on the Screen", features Titania waking up to Bottom's 'lovely' singing. While staying true to the text, the video enhances the view's experience by showing Bottom now 'transformed' into an ass. The actor's expressions and deliverance of the lines brings out the comedic aspect of the play that can sometimes be lost to the darker undertones of the text. The acting also emphasizes Bottom's arrogant personality, as even though Titania is talking to him from a foot away, he is so engrossed in his own singing that he doesn't even notice her. This video was published in 2014, and seems to host a large amount of people in the audience of the play. This shows that despite the old language of the play people still enjoy it, which reinforces the timelessness of Shakespeare's work.

more...
No comment yet.