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57% of People Won't Recommend A Brand With A Poor Mobile Site [Infographic]

57% of People Won't Recommend A Brand With A Poor Mobile Site [Infographic] | mHealth | Scoop.it

In a roundup of current mobile stats, WebDAM Solutions has crafted an infographic detailing the latest facts, figures and trends in the mobile marketing space. Among the findings:

1 in 7 in the world have a smartphone57% of people won't recommend a company with a poor mobile site1 in 4 online searches are conducted on a mobile deviceThe average American spends 2 hours a day on their mobile deviceBy 2015, mobile marketing will generate $400 billion, up from $139 billion in 2012Android in the most popular OS with 52% market shareApple's iOS has 40% market shareBut Apple's iPhone is the most popular mobile phone with 41% market shareApple's owns the tablet space with 88% market shareSMS coupons are redeemed 8 time more than emailed offersMobile ad revenue will bit $24.5 billion by 201685% of people prefer a native app over a mobile websiteiOS apps generate 4 times the revenue of Android appsFacebook has the highest mobile with at 74%Mobile LinkedIn user are twice as active as desktop usersMore than 60% of Twitter's ad revenue will come from mobile advertising by 2015

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Ray Fowler's curator insight, February 13, 2014 10:28 PM

This impacts all retailers and service providers and based on many of their failings this will continue.Revenues are hard to get, let alone sustain but lose like this is unacceptable. Get mobile

Rescooped by scott hague from Business Insights for the mHealth Market
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gsma-pwc_mhealth_report.pdf


Via Allison Hermann, PhD
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Allison Hermann, PhD's curator insight, August 2, 2013 8:01 PM

Allison Hermann, PhD's insight: Informative report! It shows how mHealth services are being adopted to fill unmet health needs country-by-country (the importance of monitoring in developed countries vs. diagnosing in developing countries).