mHealth for public health
34 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by April Coombe
Scoop.it!

Where do Sex, Humor, and Digital Health Intersect? | Digital Health Post

Where do Sex, Humor, and Digital Health Intersect? | Digital Health Post | mHealth for public health | Scoop.it
Digital tech can be a means of improving your physical health, sex life and sexual health, as well as your sense of humor.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by April Coombe from mHealth Apps for Brain and Behavior
Scoop.it!

Mobile apps for pediatric obesity prevention and treatment, healthy eating, and physical activity promotion: just fun and games?

Mobile apps for pediatric obesity prevention and treatment, healthy eating, and physical activity promotion: just fun and games? | mHealth for public health | Scoop.it

Via Allison Hermann, PhD
more...
Allison Hermann, PhD's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:47 PM

Recently, Science Daily reported on a study by Sherry Pagoto et al. that reviewed 30 popular weight loss apps. They concluded that few of the apps included evidence-based behavioral strategies for weight loss. (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131008091715.htm)


In a related study of 57 weight loss apps developed for children, Danielle E. Schoffman et al. came to the same conclusion. They urge app developers to work with public health practitioners when designing weight loss apps. I would argue developers would benefit greatly from consulting with psychologists who study cognitive and behavioral factors important for compliance and engagement.

(http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3771006/)


 

 

Rescooped by April Coombe from mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement
Scoop.it!

MIT finger device reads to the blind in real time

MIT finger device reads to the blind in real time | mHealth for public health | Scoop.it

“ Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are developing an audio reading device to be worn on the index finger of people whose vision is impaired, giving them affordable and immediate access to printed words. ”The so-called FingerReader, a prototype produced by a 3-D printer, fits like a ring on the user’s finger, equipped with a small camera that scans text. A synthesized voice reads words aloud, quickly translating books, restaurant menus and other needed materials for daily living, especially away from home or office. “ Reading is as easy as pointing the finger at text. Special software tracks the finger movement, identifies words and processes the information. The device has vibration motors that alert readers when they stray from the script, said Roy Shilkrot, who is developing the device at the MIT Media Lab. For Jerry Berrier, 62, who was born blind, the promise of the FingerReader is its portability and offer of real-time functionality at school, a doctor’s office and restaurants. ‘‘When I go to the doctor’s office, there may be forms that I wanna read before I sign them,’’ Berrier said. He said there are other optical character recognition devices on the market for those with vision impairments, but none that he knows of that will read in real time. Berrier manages training and evaluation for a federal program that distributes technology to low-income people in Massachusetts and Rhode Island who have lost their sight and hearing. He works from the Perkins School for the Blind in Watertown, Massachusetts. ‘‘Everywhere we go, for folks who are sighted, there are things that inform us about the products that we are about to interact with. I wanna be able to interact with those same products, regardless of how I have to do it,’’ Berrier said. Pattie Maes, an MIT professor who founded and leads the Fluid Interfaces research group developing the prototype, says the FingerReader is like ‘‘reading with the tip of your finger and it’s a lot more flexible, a lot more immediate than any solution that they have right now.’’ Developing the gizmo has taken three years of software coding, experimenting with various designs and working on feedback from a test group of visually impaired people. Much work remains before it is ready for the market, Shilkrot said, including making it work on cellphones. Shilkrot said developers believe they will be able to affordably market the FingerReader but he could not yet estimate a price. The potential market includes some of the 11.2 million people in the United States with vision impairment, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates. Current technology used in homes and offices offers cumbersome scanners that must process the desired script before it can be read aloud by character-recognition software installed on a computer or smartphone, Shilkrot said. The FingerReader would not replace Braille — the system of raised dots that form words, interpreted by touch. Instead, Shilkrot said, the new device would enable users to access a vast number of books and other materials that are not currently available in Braille. Developers had to overcome unusual challenges to help people with visual impairments move their reading fingers along a straight line of printed text that they could not see. Users also had to be alerted at the beginning and end of the reading material. Their solutions? Audio cues in the software that processes information from the FingerReader and vibration motors in the ring. The FingerReader can read papers, books, magazines, newspapers, computer screens and other devices, but it has problems with text on a touch screen, said Shilkrot. That’s because touching the screen with the tip of the finger would move text around, producing unintended results. Disabling the touch-screen function eliminates the problem, he said. ”Berrier said affordable pricing could make the FingerReader a key tool to help people with vision impairment integrate into the modern information economy.


Via Chatu Jayadewa, eMedToday
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by April Coombe from Latest mHealth News
Scoop.it!

Pavlok is a habit-forming wearable that will shock you

Pavlok is a habit-forming wearable that will shock you | mHealth for public health | Scoop.it
"Wake up sleepy head... it's time to go to the gym." "Put down those chips!" "Stop wasting time on Facebook." If any of the above statements resonate

Via Sam Stern
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by April Coombe from Latest mHealth News
Scoop.it!

Mobile health: Who'll keep your secrets, Apple or Google?

Mobile health: Who'll keep your secrets, Apple or Google? | mHealth for public health | Scoop.it
Apple is already working with regulators to develop a secure connected health platform that keeps your private patient data private. Is Google? (RT @KenOnHIT: Mobile health: Who'll keep your secrets, #Apple, or #Google?

Via Sam Stern
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by April Coombe from mHealth & Digital Health
Scoop.it!

FDA plan a 'huge' boost for mHealth | Healthcare IT News

FDA plan a 'huge' boost for mHealth | Healthcare IT News | mHealth for public health | Scoop.it
In a move that's being lauded by mobile health innovators, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has released dozens of mHealth medical devices from the requirements of added regulation.

Via Connected Digital Health & Life
more...
Rescooped by April Coombe from Pharmabook
Scoop.it!

Beware: These 5 mHealth Innovations Will Blow Your Mind

Beware: These 5 mHealth Innovations Will Blow Your Mind | mHealth for public health | Scoop.it
You think you have seen everything in mHealth? Give another look

Via Philippe Loizon
more...
Ver2DigiMed's curator insight, August 11, 2014 12:18 AM

These are great solutions!

Rescooped by April Coombe from mHealth: Patient Centered Care-Clinical Tools-Targeting Chronic Diseases
Scoop.it!

Research: Do patients with chronic diseases want telehealth solutions?

Research: Do patients with chronic diseases want telehealth solutions? | mHealth for public health | Scoop.it
Several recent studies addressed the link between mobile health and individuals with chronic conditions, such as asthma, arthritis, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, depression, diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, clinically diagnosed obesity, osteoporosis and stroke. 

Via ET Russell
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by April Coombe from mHealth Apps for Brain and Behavior
Scoop.it!

Sensor technology is psychologists’ latest tool in tackling drug abuse

Sensor technology is psychologists’ latest tool in tackling drug abuse | mHealth for public health | Scoop.it
Psychologists are studying the use of sensor-based devices to help treat people with substance abuse problems.

Via Allison Hermann, PhD
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by April Coombe from Latest mHealth News
Scoop.it!

Report: Microsoft to launch smartwatch with 11 sensors in October

Report: Microsoft to launch smartwatch with 11 sensors in October | mHealth for public health | Scoop.it
Microsoft plans to release its own smartwatch with 11 sensors as soon as October, according to tech news site Tom’s Hardware. Tom’s Hardware received its information from an unidentified source.

Via Sam Stern
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by April Coombe from Latest mHealth News
Scoop.it!

Smart skin patch knows when you need your meds

Smart skin patch knows when you need your meds | mHealth for public health | Scoop.it
A lot can go wrong when doctors prescribe drugs to patients. For one thing, there's always a chance that someone might forget to take their pill or refill their prescription. And then there's also...

Via Sam Stern
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by April Coombe from mHealth & Digital Health
Scoop.it!

Digital Health Tools Are a Growing Part of Workplace Wellness Programs - iHealthBeat

Digital Health Tools Are a Growing Part of Workplace Wellness Programs - iHealthBeat | mHealth for public health | Scoop.it
Digital devices and smartphone applications increasingly are being incorporated into workplace wellness programs to engage employees. Although digital tools can create efficiencies, some experts caution that they do not guarantee the health outcomes employers want.

Via Connected Digital Health & Life
more...
Connected Digital Health & Life's curator insight, August 6, 2014 4:14 AM

"They create efficiencies, but do not guarantee health outcomes.." agreed - after all it is behavioural change that is needed!