Mesopotamia
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[ANALYSIS] The rise of China's soft power - MaltaToday

[ANALYSIS] The rise of China's soft power - MaltaToday | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it

China may still pay homage to Mao’s doctrines, but its brand of state capitalism is what’s currently taking the world by storm. JAMES DEBONO analyses what lies behind the rise of China, and what the stakes are for Malta as it receives its blessing from the celestial kingdomShare on print


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Naturalistic Traditions: Were archaic Egypt and Mesopotamia ...

Naturalistic Traditions: Were archaic Egypt and Mesopotamia ... | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
Could there have been strands of naturalism running through archaic civilizations such as Egypt and Mesopotamia? As in the cases of hunter-gatherers and early agricultural peoples, tempting evidence suggests it is possible, ...
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Mike Norman Economics: Michel Bauwens — Why China may not be ‘capitalist’: the Role of the State in Chinese Economic Development

Mike Norman Economics: Michel Bauwens — Why China may not be ‘capitalist’: the Role of the State in Chinese Economic Development | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it

“A transitional economy is the economy which is established after capitalism and landlordism is abolished, and before there is a real socialist economy. It is common that one’s view of a transitional economy is coloured by how things were in the Soviet Union, Eastern Europe and China. It is easy to draw the conclusion that a well functioning transitional economy equals how things were run then, minus the dictatorship, plus workers’ control and management. In fact, things are more complex than that. In Stalinist states the economy is deformed, compared to the socialist model economy, in a much broader sense than that the plan was decided upon and implemented bureaucratically.Apart from the lack of workers democracy it was deformed in at least three more aspects:


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Gianfranco Mejía Trujillo's curator insight, September 19, 2013 9:16 AM

La propuesta del ensayo al que se hace referencia es muy interesante. Los conceptos de capitalismo y socialismo han venido siendo vinculados con aspectos políticos, dejando de lado su naturaleza económica y social.

Considerando eso, es posible que para el caso de China la aplicación de la noción de capitalismo pueda traer problemas y se tienda a vincular su reciente progreso económico con las medidas estatales implementadas para fomentar su crecimiento.

Sin embargo, lo que es importante tener en cuenta es que el capitalismo y el socialismo cuentan con características determinadas las cuales van a desarrollarse dentro de un marco institucional, en el que tiene un gran papel que jugar el Gobierno.

En ese sentido, lo que es más relevante son las condiciones y reglas de juego que determina el Gobierno para que las actividades económicas se realicen de la forma más eficiente posible y respetando los derechos de los ciudadanos.

Si lo que rige se basa en el capitalismo, socialismo u otra forma de organización, ello dependerá de su impacto en el funcionamiento del mercado, considerando el marco institucional que se encuentre vigente.

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‘Divine Felines: Cats of Ancient Egypt’ at the Brooklyn Museum

‘Divine Felines: Cats of Ancient Egypt’ at the Brooklyn Museum | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
A show at the Brooklyn Museum explores the role of cats, big and little, feral and tame, celestial and not, in ancient Egypt.

If your dream of heaven is eternity spent with the pets you love, “Divine Felines: Cats of Ancient Egypt” at the Brooklyn Museum is your exhibition. All of its 30 objects, sifted from the museum’s Egyptian collection, are of cats, big and little, feral and tame, celestial and not. Whether cast in bronze or carved in stone, their forms were to outlast time, and so they have.

Although it’s often assumed that the domestication of cats began in Egypt, archaeology suggests that Mesopotamia was the place. And despite the feline presence in religious contexts, Egyptians didn’t worship cats per se, but created gods that had their physical features, their expressive moods and their near-supernatural intelligence.


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