Mental Flexibilty
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Mental Flexibilty
Building analytical, observer, problem solving skills
Curated by Roman Smolak
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What Cultural Lenses Do You Wear?

What Cultural Lenses Do You Wear? | Mental Flexibilty | Scoop.it

"How to see the cultural perspective behind someone's actions"

 

In this article from Toastmasters magazine, the author explains how achieving effective intercultural communication requires the development of sensitivity.

 

The majority of us walk through life unaware of how our perceptions cloud our ability to fully understand people from other cultures.  Our assumptions about the world are like cultural lenses that prevent us from appreciating another’s perspective and subtleties.

 

The article describes how we should deal with differences in a different way.  Taking on a flexible
perspective helps us to develop 'mindfulness', an improved state that can expand our experiences and lead to more positive interactions.

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NLP Communication Model: Incorporating outside information

NLP Communication Model: Incorporating outside information | Mental Flexibilty | Scoop.it

This document provides the NLP model of how humans incorporate external information into their nervous system. The content of an Internal Representation is our individual thoughts, comprised of pictures, sounds, feelings, smells, tastes and self talk.

 

Internal representations are our mental maps that develop through a filtering process to represent the external world.  The Internal Representations are not a perfect replication of the external event.

 

The Internal Representation of an external event, combine together with physiology, to create a state (an internal emotion).The three act in a pattern that creates our subjective experience. These three aspects are interconnected and manifest themselves in and govern how we behave in the world.

 

 

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2011 Failure Report: Engineers Without Borders (Canada)

2011 Failure Report: Engineers Without Borders (Canada) | Mental Flexibilty | Scoop.it

Learning from our mistakes..."Only the humble improve." Wynton Marsalis

 

This may be the only annual report in the world that documents an organization's shortcomings, mistakes, and failures.  The report is comprised of 14 written responses made by the individuals responsible for the failures.

 

This type of organizational self-analysis takes courage and shows integrity - a maturity much lacking in the corporate world, where profits are often used to justify the blinders ethical practices.  The report suggests that organizations can implement attention to breakdowns, where previously "...admitting failure can be nearly impossible, never mind learning from it."

 

The intentions of report are quite noble: "Yet, try as we might to eliminate failure from the natural process of achieving any goal, we instinctively seem to know that learning from it has a transformative, irreplaceable, propellant power."

 

The relation of each individual to their organization - their role and responsibility in relation to their project input - is revealed in an honest, open manner.  Choosing to share their outcomes prevents those same failures from occurring in other projects.  Others may read about them and learn the same lesson. You may read it and find some humility, "...conversion, ...the story of human capacity."

 

 

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Calm, cool and collected: The mindful leader

Calm, cool and collected: The mindful leader | Mental Flexibilty | Scoop.it

"Meditation techniques are as valuable in the workplace as they are in your personal life."

 

Focusing your mind on what you are doing "in the moment" can transform your life. Maria Gonzales teaches strategy and organizational development at McGill University, and in her book Mindful Leadership she describes nine aspects she found are common in key mindful leaders.

 

Ms. Gonzales encourages us to take a moment to meditate in challenging or stressful times.  By centering our thoughts on a mindful principle, we can transform our attention to better focus on what we need to achieve.

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NLP and the Unconscious Mind

NLP and the Unconscious Mind | Mental Flexibilty | Scoop.it

"Neuro Linguistic Programming (NLP) derives much of its success from the techniques it uses to by-pass conscious mind activity and access the unconscious mind directly."

 

NLP recognizes flexibility as a key pillar for improving communication, awareness, and goal achievement. To enhance any of these skills one must develop new means of mental flexibility.

 

This article explains how the main preoccupation of the conscious mind is to tasks of logic, moral, and ethical analysis.  Scientists have come to attribute this activity to the left hemisphere (prefrontal cortex).

 

The right brain (right hemisphere) is associated with regulating physiological functions, and with alerting the conscious mind of external events that call for attention.  Thus, NLP presupposes that the unconscious mind is a primary determinant of behaviour.

 

According to NLP, one must learn to by-pass the conscious mind in order to impact any change to our "automatic" behaviour.  You can learn to increase flexibility. 

 

To develop greater flexibility, one must become open to understanding both:

1. How the conscious mind editorializes the conscious stream, and;

2. How the structures of subjective experience create our internal states.

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NLP and Negative Anchors

NLP and Negative Anchors | Mental Flexibilty | Scoop.it

"How a negative trigger can hijack our balanced state of well being..."

 

This author explains the meaning of negative anchors we all experience in our day to day lives.

 

Getting control of these "grabbers" gives us back our sense of emotional stability. There are methods available to identify when a trigger is about to react, and NLP suggests different solutions.

 

The simplest way to eliminate the effect of an "emotional grabber" is to first become aware of its existence, even giving it a name.  A second step is suggested which requires one to develop a new picture or feeling in one's "mind" eye. The new feeling is what you aspire to adopt as your reaction, replacing the old, unprofitable way.

 

It's up to you to decide how to react, and when you do, react in the new way, and less in the old.

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Cognitive Rigidity: methods to overcome it

This ademic paper describes how corporate organizations develop fixed assertions that produce calcified frameworks that inhibit flexibility and is a challenge to change.

 

The author explains that cognitive rigidity creates an institutional myopia which limits organizations from questioning current practices and adopting alternative strategies or conclusions.

 

Examples from the corporate world include: how a small manufacturer failed to accept the validity of a competitor's go to market strategy, thereby losing their own market leadership; how Noikia defends against its isolation geographically through foresight analysis; and, how government security agencies are coordinating previously segregated data silos, for an integrated vision of security risk.

 

The paper proposes several approaches to overcome corporate rigidity and suggests practises and tools that exploit existing insights, capabilities, and knowledge. Working through a
strategy that embraces 'contradictory' conclusions, opens the organization to possible transformative alternatives. This is viewed as positive disruption.

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The Right Mindset for Success

The Right Mindset for Success | Mental Flexibilty | Scoop.it

An interview with Carol Dweck, author of "Mindset: The New Psychology of Success."

 

Dweck describes a 'fixed' mindset as a person's belief that their intellectual qualities are fixed, and cannot be improved by any means.  A person with a fixed mindset guards themselves against situations which might challenge their abilities and lead to possibilities of failure.

 

A 'growth' mindset is simply the belief that intelligence, talent, and abilities can be developed over time.  A person with this belief accepts that through hard work and persistence, a personal trait or ability can be improved.  A failure or loss of self-esteem is not seen as something to FEAR, but an opportunity to learn something new, and improve oneself.

 

The key message is our lifelong ability to reflect on what we tell ourselves. Becoming conscious of our mindset can impact our inner dialogue, to the point where we are moved to action.  Incorporating a growth mindset supports your initiative to accept the changes required to achieve new goals, and persist through the various struggles and setbacks.

 

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True Secret to Success (It's Not What You Think)

True Secret to Success (It's Not What You Think) | Mental Flexibilty | Scoop.it

Gratitude: If you're not exercising this emotional muscle, you're probably setting yourself up for failure.

 

Taking a moment to reflect on what we can be grateful for is one method for developing wonder, contemplation and attracting more goodness into your life. 

 

Gratitude awareness develops a perspective in thinking that recognizes what's wonderful in life, and what benefits can be derived from events that fall short of our expectations.

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Text of Steve Jobs' Commencement address (2005)

Text of Steve Jobs' Commencement address (2005) | Mental Flexibilty | Scoop.it

This is a prepared text of the Commencement address delivered by Steve Jobs, CEO of Apple Computer and of Pixar Animation Studios, on June 12, 2005.

 

Jobs shares three incredible insights that inspired his thinking:

 

1. Connecting the Dots: You have the ability to join past dots to derive a useful concept; while current experiences make for dots that may get connected in the future.

2. Love and Loss: Despite a loss or setback, no active pursuit is a failure if you're doing what you love; a setback is only a source for greater learning and awareness.

3. Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish: Have the courage to follow your heart and your head. Avoid the external voices of others offering their vision or advice for you. Try not to waste your limited time living the results of someone else's life.

 

Steve Jobs attained extreme human achievements - on a personal level, and through incorporating the ingenuity of others.  He understood the limits of a mind that followed established patterns and norms.  Jobs demanded breakthroughs by imagining new realities, and developing new possibilities.  Limits must be broken if a new reality is to be created. 

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