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Fake It To Make It | Games for Change

Fake It To Make It | Games for Change | Middle East, Africa and more | Scoop.it

Fake It To Make It is a simulation-style game where players take on the role of someone creating and distributing fake news for profit. Players learn how misinformation is created, spread, and emotionally targeted, and leave better prepared to be skeptical of misinformation that they encounter in the future.


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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, November 26, 2017 2:51 PM
Interesting tool for teaching students to recognize fake news.
Presenters's curator insight, November 26, 2017 3:38 PM
Fake It To Make It es un juego que, apostando por la terrible actualidad, logra crear un entorno educativo. El jugador tiene que crear y difundir noticias para obtener beneficios, pasando por las etapas de creación, localización de un objetivo emocional, difusión... En definitiva, es un título que prepara al que lo termina para un futuro de escepticismo con las informaciones que reciba.
Ricard Garcia's curator insight, November 27, 2017 4:37 AM
Maybe a bit complex, but useful with young adults!!
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Enclaves & Exclaves

Enclaves & Exclaves | Middle East, Africa and more | Scoop.it
A tour of the world's engulfed and orphaned places.

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Mr Mac's curator insight, July 3, 2017 12:08 PM
Unit 1 - Mapping; Unit 3/4 - Ethnic Enclaves and Exclaves 
Allison Anthony's curator insight, July 5, 2017 6:08 PM

Political geography 

Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 9:01 PM

This storymap is a full length article about all the intricacies about enclaves and exclaves, but the interactive format, visuals and maps really make this much more than another article on the topic.    

 

Tags: borders, political, mappingESRIStoryMap.

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Water Is Life

Hundreds of thousands of refugees have fled South Sudan to escape the civil war. When they arrive in Uganda, water is what they need most. Without it, they will die.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 5, 2017 3:53 PM

Next to nothing in this video will make you happy about the way things operate for refugees in Northern Uganda who have fled from South Sudan.  We all know the about the dire conditions that refugees face, but knowing about the specifics, and hearing stories from the refugees about their lives and living conditions is powerful.  A huge influx of refugees can tax local resources, especially water.  Food can be shipped in, but water a much more locally variable resource.   The UN refugee camps recommend at least 15 liters of water per person be made available each day, but often it is more like 4-8 liters in these camps.  Dedicated wells (or boreholes) are more effective, but costly.  Trucking in water from the Nile River is the preferred method to simply keep these drowning people’s heads above water.    

 

Questions to Ponder: Consider how much water you drink, use for cooking, bathing, etc. per day in your household.  How difficult would it be to live on 4 liters of water a day?  What about your lifestyle would be changed? 

 

TagsAfrica, development, Uganda, South Sudan, migrationrefugees, environment, waterenvironment depend, sustainability, resources.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, April 8, 2017 11:49 PM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Interrelationships; Geographic Perspective;
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 5, 2017 12:15 PM

Next to nothing in this video will make you happy about the way things operate for refugees in Northern Uganda who have fled from South Sudan.  We all know the about the dire conditions that refugees face, but knowing about the specifics, and hearing stories from the refugees about their lives and living conditions is powerful.  A huge influx of refugees can tax local resources, especially water.  Food can be shipped in, but water a much more locally variable resource.   The UN refugee camps recommend at least 15 liters of water per person be made available each day, but often it is more like 4-8 liters in these camps.  Dedicated wells (or boreholes) are more effective, but costly.  Trucking in water from the Nile River is the preferred method to simply keep these drowning people’s heads above water.    

 

Questions to Ponder: Consider how much water you drink, use for cooking, bathing, etc. per day in your household.  How difficult would it be to live on 4 liters of water a day?  What about your lifestyle would be changed? 

 

TagsAfrica, development, Uganda, South Sudan, migrationrefugees, environment, water,  environment depend, sustainability, resources.

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Combatting FGM

"The United Nations Development Programme started to advocate against the practice of female genital mutilation (FGM) back in 2003 when it was taboo even to speak about it. In 2008, the practice was banned. The government of Egypt has institutionalized the adoption of FGM abandonment; while prevalence rates remain high (namely among older women), the response of younger girls and mothers of new generations to FGM abandonment campaigns is much higher."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 7, 2017 3:41 PM

This is always a difficult topic for me to talk about in my college classes since it is such a sensitive topic.  However, because it touches on so many taboo topics, that is the very reason that that practice of FGM has continued in many African and Middle Eastern countries.  See the map embedded in this article to know which countries have the highest prevalency rates.  Some are concerned that through relocation diffusion, international migrants can bring this practice to areas such as Europe. Western efforts to eradicate FGM are usually ineffective and sometimes backfire (the author in the linked articles feels that the term mutilation, while accurate, is counterproductive).

 

Tags: culture, gender, media

Nicole Canova's curator insight, March 24, 9:49 PM
Female genital mutilation (FGM) is a cultural practice that is or has been instituted in many countries around the world, predominantly throughout Africa and Asia.  Since the United Nations Development Programme started campaigning to end the practice in 2003, rates of FGM have dropped throughout the world.  Although it is too late for many older women, younger women and girls have received information about the harmful effects of FGM, and through them cultural attitudes toward the practice are shifting; because of that, millions of girls for generations to come may be spared from becoming victims of FGM.
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Linking the most interesting places in the world

Linking the most interesting places in the world | Middle East, Africa and more | Scoop.it

"Every city has a picturesque spot or two where the probability of a photo being taken at any given time is pretty high. Now there's a world atlas of maps showing the routes people follow while taking these pictures in every city around the world:Mapbox's Eric Fischer has been working on the "Geotaggers' World Atlas" for years, using locations of photos uploaded on Flickr over a decade. In his city maps, which now span the world, he connects the dots between subsequent photos taken by a photographer—representing their path in sketchy lines that criss-cross across the city." 

  ---Tanvi Misra on CityLab

 

Tags: mapping, visualization, social media, tourism.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 23, 2017 9:03 AM

Questions to Ponder:

  1. How does the idea of crowdsourcing influence modern-day cartography and geographic data?
  2. What kind of meaning is there in this seemingly random assortment of geotagged images?
  3. Analyze a particular pattern (anywhere in the world). Describe the location, explain the patterns you see and analyze why they are the way they are.
  4. Analyze a particular pattern (somewhere else in the world). Describe the location, explain the patterns you see and analyze why they are the way they are.
Leah Hood's curator insight, August 22, 2017 4:30 PM

Questions to Ponder:

  1. How does the idea of crowdsourcing influence modern-day cartography and geographic data?
  2. What kind of meaning is there in this seemingly random assortment of geotagged images?
  3. Analyze a particular pattern (anywhere in the world). Describe the location, explain the patterns you see and analyze why they are the way they are.
  4. Analyze a particular pattern (somewhere else in the world). Describe the location, explain the patterns you see and analyze why they are the way they are.
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xkcd: Map Age Guide

xkcd: Map Age Guide | Middle East, Africa and more | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 30, 2016 2:17 PM

I was riding my bike during Labor Day weekend and chanced upon a yard sale with an old globe going for $4 (of course I bought it and rode home one-handed).  There were some clues that it wasn't a recent globe (The Soviet Union and Yugoslavia still existed and Burkina Faso was labeled Upper Volta and Zimbabwe was listed as Rhodesia). I knew that if I wanted to know what year this globe was produced, I would need this XKCD guide. XKCD is a comic strip that deals with many intellectual issues, but it can also be a wealth of quality scientific information.  This infographic (hi-res) is amazingly useful if you are trying to find the map of an undated map, but the flow chart also is a wealth of global history and moments that 'changed the map.'

 

Tags: XKCD, artinfographic, mapping, trivia, cartography.

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Ethiopian runner makes protest sign as he crosses line in Rio

Ethiopian runner makes protest sign as he crosses line in Rio | Middle East, Africa and more | Scoop.it
Feyisa Lilesa crosses his arms as he wins a silver medal - a gesture used by his Oromo people at home to protest against the government.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 22, 2016 9:30 AM

The Olympics can bring to interesting cultural and political issues to a larger international audience.  The Oromo people in Ethiopia are off our collective radar, but this marathoner made the world pay attention and start to ask questions about a part of the world that rarely gets global attention.  Some other examples of how you can link students' interest in the Olympics to expand their understanding about the world include:

What was your favorite 'teaching moment' from the Olympics?

Tags:  political, conflict, sport.

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xkcd: Orbiter

xkcd: Orbiter | Middle East, Africa and more | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
EP Eric Pichon's insight:

...some of the difficulties in teaching about the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. 

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, political, language, toponyms, Middle East.

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Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 17, 2016 7:22 PM

I've always enjoyed this comic strip...it highlights some of the difficulties in teaching about the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. 

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, political, language, toponyms, Middle East.

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 18, 2016 4:07 AM

I've always enjoyed this comic strip...it highlights some of the difficulties in teaching about the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. 

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, political, language, toponyms, Middle East.

Leonardo Wild's curator insight, March 18, 2016 9:10 AM

I've always enjoyed this comic strip...it highlights some of the difficulties in teaching about the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. 

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, political, language, toponyms, Middle East.

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Changing How We Think About Africa

Do you speak African? Well, neither do the 1 billion people on the continent.Africa is home to 54 different nations, more than 2,000 languages and four of the world's 10 fastest growing economies, but is often painted with a sweeping stroke of doom and gloom. In this week's Reality Check, Mehdi Hasan exposes popular misconceptions about the African continent.

Via Seth Dixon
EP Eric Pichon's insight:

This short video is full of with examples and statistics that show that many of the 'doom and gloom' perspectives and ways of thinking about Africa are outdated (at best).  Here are some good facts to update how we talk about Africa. 

 

Tags: Africa, perspective.

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Denise Klaves Stewardson's curator insight, March 21, 2016 3:07 PM

This short video is full of with examples and statistics that show that many of the 'doom and gloom' perspectives and ways of thinking about Africa are outdated (at best).  Here are some good facts to update how we talk about Africa. 

 

Tags: Africa, perspective.

Taylor Doonan's curator insight, March 24, 5:12 PM
This video combats many misunderstandings about Africa, the biggest one being that many people view Africa as one nation instead of 54 unique nations. It also talks about how some African countries are on the rise and that women have a large role in many governments in Africa. The video aims to take away the stigma of war and poverty that goes along with Africa. 
David Stiger's curator insight, November 10, 4:43 PM
This video mentions that the Western world's negative, doom and gloom perception of Africa are "lazy" and this is important. Westerners may have become so accustomed to the colonial and post-colonial problems in Africa, that there is an outside attitude of "what good could possibly come from Africa - they are doomed and deserve our pity and charity." In reality, as this video points out, Africa is not just one single entity and its different players are on the rise. It is a continent of 54 separate countries containing 1 billion people who speak from a range of 2,000 languages. The video mentions that nearly one third of Africa is part of the middle class. With that said, in our geographic mental maps, it is time to start looking at Africa like the 'Tiger Countries of Asia', like South Korea, who blossomed into economic powerhouses. This is a fair comparison as Africa now has the ten fastest growing economies in the world, outpacing the West. With this line of thinking, Africa is a continent full of opportunity containing a lot of promising potential if given the chance. Interestingly, if white-Americans and white-Europeans improved their attitudes about the 54 countries of Africa (and saw them as capable societies) this would humanize non-white people in general and probably reduce racist, bigoted attitudes. 
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Burundi says an intervention by the African Union will be an act of “invasion”

Burundi says an intervention by the African Union will be an act of “invasion” | Middle East, Africa and more | Scoop.it

Burundi has rejected the decision by the African Union (AU) to send in troops to the east African country saying the presence of such a force in the country will be perceived as an "invasion and occupation force." "We will not allow foreign troops in Burundi. We don't need them," 

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Child soldiers

Child soldiers | Middle East, Africa and more | Scoop.it
According to UNICEF, 1,750 child soldiers have been released and returned to their families in South Sudan. But around the world, the practice of using children as soldiers continues.
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The 21st-century gold rush where people work in 19th-century conditions - Quartz

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"

"A 21st-century gold rush in Sudan. The conflict-torn country is pinning its economic hopes on an explosion in artisanal gold mining. Peter Schwartzstein and Leyland Cecco traveled to northern Sudan to document, in words and pictures, the lives of the men who immerse themselves in pools of mercury- and cyanide-tainted water to sift out the yellow metal."

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Carte à la une : les damnés de la mer — Géoconfluences

Carte à la une : les damnés de la mer — Géoconfluences | Middle East, Africa and more | Scoop.it
En 20 ans (1993-2015), plus de 30 000 migrants sont morts ou portés disparus en essayant de rejoindre l’Union européenne. Comment la carte, en proposant une représentation schématique de l’espace, peut-elle déployer des arguments pour jouer un rôle non négligeable dans le débat public ?
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The last globemakers

Peter Bellerby is one of the last artisan globemakers on earth. But now, he's teaching an entirely new generation of artists the secrets of crafting entire worlds by hand.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 15, 2017 8:19 PM

Yes, these globes are precise archives filled with geospatial data and locational information–however, that pales in comparison to the artistic brilliance of the globes. These hand-crafted globes are truly works of art.  Marvel at the merger of mathematical precision and artistic design that makes a globe such as these a cartographic gem.  If anybody want to get me a Christmas present, you know that I love cartographic gifts.  FUTURE WATCHING: Here is the longer video of the Bellerby Globes being produced.     

 

Tags: cartography, visualization, mapping, artgeo-inspiration.

M Sullivan's curator insight, September 28, 2017 9:38 PM
Incredible hand-crafted globes and their stories.
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Syria's war: Who is fighting and why [Updated]

"After four-plus years of fighting, Syria's war has killed at least hundreds of thousands of people and displaced millions. And, though it started as a civil war, it's become much more than that. It's a proxy war that has divided much of the Middle East, and has drawn in both Russia and the United States. To understand how Syria got to this place, it helps to start at the beginning and watch it unfold."


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Matt Manish's curator insight, May 3, 8:53 PM
The Syrian war started in 2011 when Bashar al-Assad made an attack against the peaceful protesters. It was when the protestors started shooting back that the civil war started. Those protesters we’re also joined by some Syrian troops who became the Free Syrian Army. Extremist then start traveling to Syria to join the Rebels. The USA assigns a secret order to use the CIA to train the Rebels to fight against Assad. Assad response by using chemical weapons against the Rebels, which cause the USA to almost bomb Assad. It was in 2014 that an Al-Qaeda affiliate breaks off from Assad, due to internal disagreements, and forms the Islamic State of Iraq (better known as ISIS). The US starts bombing ISIS, and not Assad. Which shows that America opposes ISIS more than Assad. This becomes confusing, because the US sees ISIS as its main enemy, when ISIS has its focus on other priorities. Later, Donald Trump wins the election and vows to stay out of Syria. Assad then bombs his own people again, and the US responds by bombing an Assad Air Base in Syria. This was the first time the US attacked the Assad regime.
Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, October 28, 9:37 PM
The war in Syria has been devastating to Syrian's inhabitants. After six years of this conflict it has become a mess and is divided into four sections or groups, all backed different foreign backers. The backers have know become so confused on who there fighting for and what there fighting for, that is how messy this war has gotten. The use of chemical warfare has killed hundreds of thousands of people and displaced millions. As to why there is a major Syrian refugee crisis. The conflict started as an internal war against Assad and rebels. This small civil war has know turned into a global conflict. I wish I could say what foreign countries are backing who and why but the lines are very blurred and there has been many back stabbing. All these foreign powers entering this war has established Syria as a great power dispute. The Assad and rebels conflict also brew the other two sections that are fighting in this region the Kurds who want their own nation. The Kurds are the largest cultural and ethnic group without a country. The entrance of the Kurds in the fighting brought in more foreign countries to either support their efforts or squash the Kurds hopes of obtaining a nation of there own. Then you have ISIS who formed as a branch out of the original rebels because there was an internal dispute. Overall this war is bloody and will never end if all these four sections cant come to an agreement. If there is no determination for peace there will never be peace.
David Stiger's curator insight, October 31, 6:59 PM
Hearing about the news in Syria is usually tragic and frustrating. It is also equally confusing and this video helped to sort out its causes and important transformations over time. Even with the video's succinct explanation, the conflict is still a quagmire to understand. The fighting began during the 2011 Arab Spring when peaceful Syrian protesters were gunned down by Assad's military forces. Instead of backing down and caving into the violent repression, the Syrian civilians retaliated with small arms fire and were joined by Syrian army defectors. The now belligerent protesters formed their own rebel army, causing Syria to erupt into a civil war. Then Islamic extremists, including a terrorist groups, joined the rebels. Countries like Turkey and Jordan began funding and arming the rebels while Iran - a Shiite country - provided support to Assad. Appalled by the out-of-control death toll, the United States began training and arming the rebels - some of whom were from Al Qaeda! Assad's chemical weapons attack escalated U.S. involvement while Russia came to the side of Assad. Putin most likely supports Assad to maintain its lease of a key geographic asset - a warm-water naval base -while also discouraging internal rebellion. At some point a group of ethnic Kurds in northern Syria succeeded (Putin's fear) and began attacking Assad. But, Turkey started attacking the Kurds! Then in 2014 ISIS broke away from Al Qaeda and started attacking the Kurds and the rebels prompting the U.S. to redirect its focus away from the Assad regime. This has to be the messiest conflict in modern history and is entirely defined by proxy wars. Because the war is so convoluted and complicated, there is no end in sight. The relentless destruction over years has caused millions of refugees to flee to Europe because it is the closest stable place to Syria. This unprecedented wave of migrations will surely transform Europe and cripple Syria in the long run.  
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De L’Europe vers les Suds : nouvelles itinérances ou migrations à rebours - Autrepart 2016/1 - Cairn.info

De L’Europe vers les Suds : nouvelles itinérances ou migrations à rebours - Autrepart 2016/1 - Cairn.info | Middle East, Africa and more | Scoop.it

Déplacer le regard et mettre la focale, non pas sur l’arrivée des migrants en Europe, mais sur les départs d’Europe vers les Suds est un pari audacieux à l’heure où les médias insistent sur la « crise migratoire ». Alors que les pays du Sud enregistrent des taux de croissance économique constamment positifs et que certains États facilitent l’installation des étrangers, de nouveaux scénarios se dessinent, augurant d’une remise en mouvement des Européens. Ce contexte particulier conduit les chercheurs à renouveler leurs catégories d’analyse pour rendre compte au plus près des processus de mobilité, et à réinterroger les relations de causalité entre la crise économique de 2008 et le départ vers les Suds. Le concept de lifestyle migrations ne peut résumer la richesse des mobilités enregistrées aujourd’hui ni les multiples compétences sociales et spatiales que développent les populations mobiles pour se faire une place dans ce « nouvel âge » des migrations. Aux côtés de retraités et des touristes qui émigrent au Sud pour y travailler, ou encore des expatriés, cohabitent d’autres profils dont les trajectoires n’ont été, jusqu’à présent, que très rarement documentées. Recolonisation des Suds, retour aux sources familiales, mobilité à rebours ou migration itinérante entre deux continents : quel sens donner à ces mouvements migratoires d’une ampleur croissante ? Sont-ils annonciateurs d’autres recompositions et flexibilités, participant d’un nouvel équilibre mondial ?


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Special Economic Zones

Special Economic Zones | Middle East, Africa and more | Scoop.it

"Special Economic Zones (SEZs) are the most rapidly spreading kind of city, having catapulted exports and growth from Mauritius and the Dominican Republic to Shenzhen and Dubai -- and now across Africa. Today more than 4000 SEZs dot the planet, a major indication of our transition towards the "supply chain world" explored in Connectography.  See more maps from Connectography and order the book here."

 

Tags: globalization, urban, economic, industry, regions.


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Making Globes

"Colored printed sections showing the map of the world are cut to shape then pasted onto the surface of the globes and a protective coat of varnish is added. Narrator recounts the fact that lots of the workers have been there for over 30 years and quips: 'While the rest of the mankind does its best to blow the world up, they like building a new one.'"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 14, 2016 4:52 PM

I love watching globes made by hand and this vintage video shows the process of globes being made in London in 1955.  While most globe production is mechanized today, you can also watch the Bellerby company use gorgeous artistry to handcraft globes today.   

 

Tags: cartography, visualization, mapping, artgeo-inspiration.

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DR Congo election: 17 dead in anti-Kabila protests

DR Congo election: 17 dead in anti-Kabila protests | Middle East, Africa and more | Scoop.it
Three police officers and 14 civilians die in Kinshasa, capital of DR Congo, during protests calling for President Joseph Kabila to step down.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 19, 2016 9:22 PM

The DRC is a land of great wealth but is impoverished.  This may seem strange to outsiders but the weakness of their social institutions pays a key role in keeping the economy from reaching it's potential.  Strong institutions matter more than resources for sustained economic development. The most important line in the article was the last one: "DR Congo has never had a smooth transfer of power since independence more than 55 years ago."  That is a staggering historical burden.  

 

Tags: Congo, political, conflict, Africa.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 24, 2016 7:46 AM
DR Congo election: 17 dead in anti-Kabila protests
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Projected Religious Population Changes in Sub-Saharan Africa

Projected Religious Population Changes in Sub-Saharan Africa | Middle East, Africa and more | Scoop.it

"The total population in sub-Saharan Africa is expected to grow at a faster pace than in any other region in the decades ahead, more than doubling from 823 million in 2010 to 1.9 billion in 2050. As a result, the two dominant religions in the region – Christianity and Islam – both are expected to have more than twice as many adherents in 2050 as in 2010."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 16, 2016 2:58 PM

Sub-Saharan Africa is one of the poorest regions of the world. While the economy is growing, the rate at which poverty is falling is less than the population growth rate.  Nearly all of the population growth in Africa between now and 2050 is expected to occur in Sub-Saharan Africa.  As the population grows, the religious dynamics of Sub-Saharan Africa will change.  The share of residents practicing Christianity, the majority religion of the region, is expected to decline from 2010 to 2050 while the share of Muslims is expected to increase in the same time frame.  The changes in religious demographics is occurring alongside the region’s youth bulge (click here for a population pyramid).  Understanding religious demographics is key to understanding the challenges faced by the African people.   

 

Question to Ponder: What impact are the region’s two fastest-growing religions having on Sub-Saharan Africa’s overall fertility rate?    

 

Tagsreligionpopulation, ChristianityIslam, Africa.

Rainey Vause's curator insight, March 26, 2017 10:26 PM

Unit 2

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If The World Were 100 People

If the population of the world was only 100 people, what would society look like? How many people would have shelter? Clean water? Education?

Via Seth Dixon
EP Eric Pichon's insight:

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

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Ella Price's curator insight, March 28, 2016 9:19 PM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

MsPerry's curator insight, March 31, 2016 12:57 PM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

Denise Klaves Stewardson's curator insight, April 1, 2016 4:06 PM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

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Ten Ways on How Not To Think About the Iran/Saudi Conflict

Ten Ways on How Not To Think About the Iran/Saudi Conflict | Middle East, Africa and more | Scoop.it

"Sometimes when a conflict involves Muslims, Islam may not be the best category for understanding it. Omid Safi with a reflection on the current crisis between Iran and Saudi Arabia, and why framing it as religion is not the most helpful framework."

 

In the last few days, virtually every news outlet has featured a series of stories on the rising tensions between Iran and Saudi Arabia. The conflict by now is well-known: Saudi Arabia executed 47 people, including Shi‘i cleric Nimr al-Nimr. While both Iran and Saudi Arabia are among the worst global executioners of dissidents, the sheer size of these executions was rare even by their gruesome standards. Iran retaliated through bombastic rhetoric, stating, “God’s hand of retaliation will grip the neck of Saudi politicians.” The two countries have broken off diplomatic relations, a tension that has rippled across the region. 

 

Tags: Saudi Arabia, political, conflict, Iran, Middle East.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 9, 2016 11:28 AM

This is a good reminder that the conflict between Saudi Arabia and Iran is not just a Persian/Arab, Sunni/Shiite issue.  This isn't just some resurgence of an ancient battle but there are many modern geopolitical issues including oil and regional rivalries.

Mr. D's Social Studies Classroom's curator insight, March 2, 2016 5:55 PM

This is a good reminder that the conflict between Saudi Arabia and Iran is not just a Persian/Arab, Sunni/Shiite issue.  This isn't just some resurgence of an ancient battle but there are many modern geopolitical issues including oil and regional rivalries.

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Meet the Sperm Smugglers and Permaculture Farmers of the Occupied Territories

Meet the Sperm Smugglers and Permaculture Farmers of the Occupied Territories | Middle East, Africa and more | Scoop.it
Photographer Tanya Habjouqa’s pictures of Palestinian life reveal a world that’s far more diverse than the news would have you believe.
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Mali: Peace from Below? - International Crisis Group

Mali: Peace from Below? - International Crisis Group | Middle East, Africa and more | Scoop.it
Hesitant steps toward peace in Mali have been helped by the recent pacts signed in Anefis by pro-government armed groups and by rebel representatives. While not sufficient or without risks, they are rooted in local initiatives and tackle issues left out of June’s Bamako accord. This offers a serious opportunity to put the peace process back on track.
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The Eastern Congo

The Eastern Congo | Middle East, Africa and more | Scoop.it
A CFR InfoGuide Presentation

The eastern Congo has been ravaged by foreign invasions and homegrown rebellions that have killed and displaced millions. A fragile peace process seeks to bring stability to central Africa, but its hard-won gains remain at risk.
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