Men's Health in the Medical Journals
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Men's Health in the Medical Journals
Information about the health concerns of men
Curated by Daniel Pendick
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Healthy fats may fight early-stage prostate cancer

Healthy fats may fight early-stage prostate cancer | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it
Each year, nearly a quarter of a million American men learn they have prostate cancer. Most are diagnosed with early-stage cancer that has not spread beyond the prostate gland.
Daniel Pendick's insight:

This important study gives real hope to men in treatment for prostate cancer that eating healthy food can make a real difference—although it remains unclear whether you get the benefit from what you DO eat, what you DO NOT eat, or a combination of both.

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Food for Men: 10 Foods to Boost Male Health

Food for Men: 10 Foods to Boost Male Health | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it
Men are different from women in all kinds of ways -- including their nutritional needs. These 10 foods can help deliver the nutrition a man needs.
Daniel Pendick's insight:

A tasty stir fry of pop nutrition peppered with frequent nonsense and falsehood. Can we do better than this?

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21st-Century Smoking Hazards and the Benefits of Quitting | Now@NEJM

21st-Century Smoking Hazards and the Benefits of Quitting | Now@NEJM | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it
In 1964 the U.S. Surgeon General Report provided the first warning that smoking has adverse health effects. This statement has had a profound impact on both our
Daniel Pendick's insight:

A study in the Jan. 24 New England Journal of Medicine adds to long-term data on the health impacts of smoking. It found that current smokers are at three times the risk of death from any cause.

 

As I reported in the Jan. 2013 Harvard Men's Health Watch, a Japanese long-term study found: "Smokers who picked up the habit early in adulthood and did not quit ultimately lost a decade of life due to a variety of causes. However, those who quit by age 35 eliminated nearly all of the risk they would have faced if they continued to smoke."

 

People can still lower their risk of illness even if they quit smoking in their 60s, 70s, or 80s."

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Regret Over Shorter Penis After Prostate Cancer Treatment, Study Finds

Regret Over Shorter Penis After Prostate Cancer Treatment, Study Finds | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it
A new study suggests men should be warned of another possible complication of prostate cancer treatment: a shorter penis.
Daniel Pendick's insight:

This is a nicely done story by Rachel Zimmerman (WBUR) about the penile shortening study reported earlier on this ScoopIt site. She correctly focuses on the distress that unanticipated side effects cause patients, who just want to know the risks they face from procedures. People are upset when something happens, however rare, that they were never warned about.

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Unique Christmas Ornament Promotes Men's Health

Unique Christmas Ornament Promotes Men's Health | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it
Orchid's Bauballs is a unique Christmas ornament designed to promote men's health.
Daniel Pendick's insight:

This seems like that special category of gift, the "joke present for the man who has everything." If only I could think of one, I could retire to Fiji...

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Incomplete MPR reporting on Mayo prostate cancer scan

Incomplete MPR reporting on Mayo prostate cancer scan | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it
Daniel Pendick's insight:

A Minnesota Public Radio report described a new kind of diagnostic test being offered at the Mayo Clinic for identifying recurrences of prostate cancer. It is supposed to zero in on tiny spots of new cancer in men already treated. Sounds like a great thing.

But if you read the analysis by Harvard's Harold J. DeMonaco, you get a different impression. According to the limited research data, this scan may incorrectly identify cancer 15%-47% of the time, meaning that a follow-up biopsy discovers that there is NO cancer. Also, a study found that it missed cancer 11% of the time.

Certainly many men who have been treated for  advanced cancer would take those odds. But they need to be fully informed about what the scan CAN and CANNOT do. That is the crucial function journalists perform in a healthcare marketplace rife with uncritical promotion of every new procedure, in perhaps the most overtreated and, in some ways, unhealthy population in the Western world.

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28 Tips for Nighttime Heartburn Relief from the Medical Experts at MedicineNet.com.

28 Tips for Nighttime Heartburn Relief from the Medical Experts at MedicineNet.com. | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it

Talk about tips! Here are 28 pearls of wisdom on how to reduce heartburn symtoms. The experts I have talked to say that if you implement lifestyle changes like these, some people (not all) may be able to wean off daily PPI drugs and just use spot-control meds like H2 blockers to douse occasional heartburn. But don't stop taking a PPI without talking to your doctor first! Some people really need them to prevent risk of esophageal cancer, a nasty and difficult-to-treat disease.

 

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Impressive antihypertensive effect with flaxseed

Impressive antihypertensive effect with flaxseed | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it

QUOTE> "This reduction of SBP and DBP after administration of dietary flaxseed is the largest decrease in BP ever shown by any dietary intervention," said Dr Delfin Rodriguez (University Hospital Holguin, Cuba) speaking here today at the American Heart Association 2012 Scientific Sessions. < UNQUOTE

This is why good health reporters are cautious about astoundingly good results from small clinical trials announced at meetings that have not been published yet. This doctor says he can reduce blood pressure significantly in people with peripheral artery disease (usually, clogged leg arterie) with flaxseed in diet. I'd like to see the data before I start chasing this one... I suspect the online press will have no such reservations.

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Cardio Notes: Obese in 20s, BP Issues in 50s

Cardio Notes: Obese in 20s, BP Issues in 50s | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it
Young men who are obese have a four times greater risk of being hypertensive in middle age and later in life.
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When Is Ejaculation 'Premature'?

When Is Ejaculation 'Premature'? | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it

"How long is sex supposed to last? One consensus of sex therapists said 3 to 7 minutes of penis-in-vagina is "adequate," while 7 to 13 minutes is "desirable." — The Atlantic

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Alcohol intake plugs 100 calories per day into diets of U.S. adults

Alcohol intake plugs 100 calories per day into diets of U.S. adults | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it

The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey report released November 16 studied the alcohol consumption from a unique angle: How many calories come from alcohol...

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Prostate cancer websites too hard to read

Prostate cancer websites too hard to read | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it
Despite 90 million U.S. adults reading below the high-school level, few cancer websites are written to meet their reading abilities, researchers found.
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Ways to prevent prostate cancer

Ways to prevent prostate cancer | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it
A New York robotic prostate surgeon advises men a healthy diet, routine exercise and sex on a regular basis all help prevent prostate cancer.

 

This "news" story is nothing more than a lightly edited press release issued by the very expert quoted in the story. The irony is that under the UPI logo that brands the story are these words: "Over 100 years of journalistic excellence." Allowing yourself to be used as a press agent by a surgeon with a clear professional agenda (promoting robotic prostate surgery) is neither "excellent" nor "journalistic." It's just an embarrassing, sad shame. At least the SacramentoBee.com had the decency to finally start including a label on its Samadi "news" pieces that it is a reprint of a press release.

 

You guys should not be doing this. How would a reader know that your source wrote his OWN STORY if you don't tell them? If you are not going to do your job, at least SAY you are not doing your job.

 

Here is the original Samadi press release:

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/six-steps-to-stop-prostate-cancer-171842951.html

 

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Red Meat and Cancer

Red Meat and Cancer | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it
Daniel Pendick's insight:

The actual credibility of an "expert" online is inversely proportional to the number of letters listed after his name. In this case:

"About Dr. Geo Espinosa, N.D., L.Ac, CNS, RH (AHG)....."

Everything listed in this article is based on weak, inconclusive, anecdotal, or observational evidence (just like most "health science" content you find in ads around the edges of web pages). In this case, you flip through several panels of "science" before you reach the inevitable ad for a miracle prostate dietary supplement.

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Another bad example of reporting on robotic surgery

Another bad example of reporting on robotic surgery | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it
Daniel Pendick's insight:

Some prospective residents and fellows won't even consider accepting a position at a major hospital if they don't have a robotic surgical bay available to train on.  It's another example of a factor driving the proliferation of expensive medical technology that may have little to do with patient outcomes--in this case, the point is that surgeons in training perceive robotic surgery as good for their careers. That said, I am sure they also believe robots are good for patients.

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Some docs screen for prostate cancer without asking

Some docs screen for prostate cancer without asking | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - One in four family doctors doesn't ask male patients before screening them for prostate cancer, according to a new survey.So-called prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing
Daniel Pendick's insight:

PSA screening has real potential harms, particularly for men at average or lower-than-average risk for prostate cancer. One possible driver for this practice is defensive testing: Making sure the doctor gets it on record that he/she ordered a PSA test in case the man later develops cancer and hires a lawyer to sue for malpractice, alleging that the doctor could have detected the cancer earlier and cured the disease.

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Some Complain of Shorter Penis After Prostate Cancer Treatment: Study

Some Complain of Shorter Penis After Prostate Cancer Treatment: Study | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it
THURSDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) — A small number of men with prostate cancer complain that their penis appears to be shorter following treatment, doctors report.
Daniel Pendick's insight:

A few important caveats on this information...

 

1. This was based on spontaneous reports from men of penile shortening, and not checked independently or measured. The men perceived that their penises were shorter, but the exactly amount is unreported.

 

2. It affects a relatively small number of people: about 24 men out of 948 (2.6%). That doesn't mean it's not important, but it's not an epidemic, either.

 

Anyone planning surgery of any kind should have a very assertive conversation with the surgeon about the possible downsides, how common they are, and what could be done to fix them if they occur.

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Bad Habits May Imperil Progress on CV Outcomes

Although rates of heart disease and stroke continue to fall, a rising tide of unhealthy behaviors may start to reverse those improvements, according to an American Heart Association report.
Daniel Pendick's insight:

Once you develop cardiovascular disease, expensive technical medicine is very good at keeping you alive. But this report suggests that a larger number of people will need those services, further straining the economy--perhaps to the breaking point. Is it time to start building incentives into healthcare to force people to reduce preventable risk factors, like smoking and obesity? Or would that just create an even larger underinsured underclass that would, ultimately, reach the E.R. in even worse shape, further driving up costs? It's a vicious circle.

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Ian McKellen reveals he's been fighting prostate cancer for six or seven years

Ian McKellen reveals he's been fighting prostate cancer for six or seven years | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it
No, actually, he is NOT fighting it. That is the point. He has come to understand that he is more likely to die WITH his cancer than FROM it. This headline is unfortunate. Would that we could get beyond always seeing the response to cancer as a war....
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Drug Combos Hit Hep C Virus Hard

Drug Combos Hit Hep C Virus Hard | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it

BOSTON -- A series of all-oral regimens for hepatitis C -- with four or five drugs each but without interferon -- yielded response rates of greater than 85% in difficult-to-treat patients...

 

Much better and easier medications for hep-C are on the way. That's why the CDC has been calling for testing of all baby boomers for hep-C infection, which can cause liver failure and liver cancer.

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Running from alcoholism: Replacing addiction with a healthy obsession

Running from alcoholism: Replacing addiction with a healthy obsession | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it
Mishka Shubaly became an ultra-runner to sober up. Experts say he's not alone in using exercise to overcome addiction.
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Men who can't see their penis while standing risk early death

Men who can't see their penis while standing risk early death | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it
A health website has launched a campaign, "The Big Check," a new test of obesity for men: take off your clothes, stand upright naked and look down at your penis.
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Teenage Boys, Worried About Body Image, Take Health Risks

Teenage Boys, Worried About Body Image, Take Health Risks | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it
It is not just girls these days who are consumed by an unattainable body image. Many boys have begun to take unhealthy measures to reshape their bodies.

 

Advertising has already traumatized a generation of girls into bulimia; now its the boys turn... except it's weight training.

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Meet India's Fittest Men: Hrithik Roshan

Meet India's Fittest Men: Hrithik Roshan | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it

I don't mean to be sarcastic, but is he India's fittest man—or simply India's most enthusiastic consumer of anabolic steroids? If so, then implying this man is "fit" because he is superhumanly "cut" is a bit perverse.

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Tim Griffin's comment, January 24, 2013 10:31 AM
I guess being hairless is now part of the definition of fitness as well.
Daniel Pendick's comment, January 24, 2013 12:07 PM
Yes, and well oiled!
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Stents Help Some Erectile Dysfunction (not)

Stents Help Some Erectile Dysfunction (not) | Men's Health in the Medical Journals | Scoop.it
MIAMI -- Stenting blocked arteries in the pelvis may improve sexual function for certain men with erectile dysfunction unresponsive to medical therapy, longer-term follow-up of a pilot trial indicated...

 

A great example of a new treatment that should never see the light of day. Does this not seem like a treatment more likely to help stent-installers boost income rather than help men with ED? Perhaps I have grown too cynical.....

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