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4 Ways to Improve Your Mental Game

4 Ways to Improve Your Mental Game | Memory | Scoop.it
A healthy mind can lead to great performances on the basketball court. Here are four ways to get your brain ready to lead your body. (Process over result “@iHoopsTweets: Want to improve your shooting percentage?
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Smell and Memory: Old Feelings in a New Place | Psychology Today

RT @DrEscotet: Smell and Memory: Old Feelings in a New Place - #Neuroscience via Psychology Today – http://t.co/GXIungs0

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How Memory Works — PsyBlog

How Memory Works — PsyBlog | Memory | Scoop.it
Find out how memory twists, pops, distorts, persists and decays, along with the odd tip on how to improve it.
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4 Ways to Supercharge Your Working Memory for Free - PsychCentral.com (blog)

4 Ways to Supercharge Your Working Memory for Free - PsychCentral.com (blog) | Memory | Scoop.it
4 Ways to Supercharge Your Working Memory for Free
PsychCentral.com (blog)
Research from British psychologist Jackie Andrade suggests that doodling can help you recall information by enlisting your working memory.
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The Era of Memory Engineering Has Arrived: Scientific American

The Era of Memory Engineering Has Arrived: Scientific American | Memory | Scoop.it
How neuroscientists can call up and change a memory (The Era of Memory Engineering Has Arrived http://t.co/53RAZlMhAU #psychology)
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Memory: Types, Facts, and Myths

Memory: Types, Facts, and Myths | Memory | Scoop.it

Our memory system, according to cognitive psychology, is divided into the following 2 types: 

 

Short-term memory that stores sounds, images and words, allows for short computations and filters information that either goes to long-term memory or is discarded.

Long-term memory that allows us to store information based on meaning and importance for extended periods of time, affects our perception and constitutes a framework where new info is attached. 

 

MAIN CHARACTERISTICS OF SHORT-TERM MEMORY

 

Short-term memory has 3 main characteristics:

 

- Brief duration that can only last up to 20 seconds.

- Its capacity is limited to 7 ±2 chunks of independent information (Miller’s Law) and is vulnerable to interference and interruption.

- Its weakening (due to many reasons, such as medication, sleep deprivation, a stroke, or a head injury, for example) is the first step to memory loss.


Short-term memory is responsible for 3 operations:

 

 - Iconic, which is the ability to store images.

 - Acoustic, which is the ability to store sounds. 

 - Working Memory, which is the ability to store information until it’s put to use.

 

For some scientists, working memory is synonymous to short-term memory, but truth is that working memory is not only used for information storage, but also for the manipulation of information. What’s important is that it’s flexible, dynamic and makes all the difference in successful learning.

 

MAIN CHARACTERISTICS OF LONG-TERM MEMORY

 

Information in Long-term memory is stored as a network of schemas, which then converts into knowledge structures. This is exactly why we recall relevant knowledge when we stumble upon similar information. The challenge for an instructional designer is to activate those existing structures before presenting new information and that can be achieved in a variety of ways, like with graphics, movies, curiosity-provoking questions, etc.  

 

2 Types of Long-term memory 

 

 - Explicit: Conscious memories that include our perception of the world, as well as our own personal experiences.

 - Implicit: Unconscious memories that we use without realizing it. 

 

Long-term memory is responsible for 3 operations

 

- Encoding, which is the ability to convert information into a knowledge structure.

- Storage, which is the ability to accumulate chunks of information.

- Retrieval, which is the ability to recall things we already know.


Via Huey O'Brien, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Huey O'Brien's curator insight, June 7, 2013 5:03 PM

IMPLICATION:  Lesson Design, Memory, Practice

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How Memory Works: 10 Things Most People Get Wrong

How Memory Works: 10 Things Most People Get Wrong | Memory | Scoop.it
“If we remembered everything we should on most occasions be as ill off as if we remembered nothing.”...

 

It's often said that a person is the sum of their memories. Your experience is what makes you who you are.

 

Memory, then, shapes the very core of human experience. Despite this, memory is generally poorly understood, which is why many people say they have 'bad memories'. That's partly because the analogies we have to hand—like that of computer memory—are not helpful. Human memory is vastly more complicated and quirky than the memory residing in our laptops, tablets or phones.

 

Here is my 10-point guide to the psychology of memory (it is based on an excellent review chapter by the distinguished UCLA memory expert, Professor Robert A. Bjork)


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Memory implantation is now officially real

Memory implantation is now officially real | Memory | Scoop.it

In a study published in the latest issue of Science, a team of researchers led by MIT neuroscientist and Nobel Laureate Susumu Tonegawa demonstrate their ability to isolate and activate engrams in a mouse's memory-rich hippocampus. The researchers go on to implant false memories in the mouse's mind, causing it to recall experiences that have never actually occurred. Here's how they did it.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Pedro Barbosa's curator insight, July 25, 2013 5:15 PM

Excellent article. Mandatory

 

Pedro Barbosa | www.pbarbosa.com | www.harvardtrends.com 

David Gifford's curator insight, July 26, 2013 3:05 AM

Singularity coming...

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Your Memory Isn't What You Think It Is | Psychology Today

Memories change each time we remember. By Arthur Dobrin, D.S.W....
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