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Study Offers Evidence that Sunscreen Use in Childhood Prevents Melanoma in Adults

Study Offers Evidence that Sunscreen Use in Childhood Prevents Melanoma in Adults | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Research conducted at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute, published in the latest issue of the scientific journal Pigment Cell and Melanoma, has established unequivocally in a natural animal model that the incidence of malignant melanoma in adulthood can be dramatically reduced by the consistent use of sunscreen in infancy and childhood.


"According to senior author John L. VandeBerg, Ph.D., the research was driven by the fact that, despite the increasing use of sunscreen in recent decades, the incidence of malignant melanoma, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, continues to increase dramatically. The American Cancer Society estimates that more than 75,000 new cases of melanoma will be diagnosed in the U.S. this year."

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 19, 2014

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ABCDE Method Often Misses Melanomas in Children

ABCDE Method Often Misses Melanomas in Children | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A common rule of thumb for diagnosing melanomas is not reliable in children. A new study evaluated the ABCDE method—asymmetry, border irregularity, color variation, diameter greater than 6 mm, evolution—in 70 children up to age 19 years who had been diagnosed with melanoma or treated for suspected melanoma. The ABCDE criteria did not apply to about 45% of them. Rather, these 'nonstandard' melanomas were often new, bled, bumpy, varied in diameter, and were one color or lacked pigment altogether (amelanotic). Of the 10 children who died, 7 had melanomas that lacked pigment. To diagnose melanoma in children more accurately, the researchers call for using new ABCD criteria—amelanotic; bleeding; bump; color uniformity; de novo, any diameter—in conjunction with the conventional ABCDE criteria.

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Medical Xpress│Jul 19, 2013

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Youth Linked to Melanoma Survival

Youth Linked to Melanoma Survival | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Melanoma is rare in children and is usually treated as it is in adults. However, this skin cancer behaves differently in young people. To pinpoint the differences and their significance for survival in these patients, researchers created an international registry of children with melanoma. The registry includes 365 children between ages 1 and 21 years who were diagnosed with melanoma between 1953 and 2008. While the numbers are too small to be sure, a new analysis of this registry suggests that 10-year survival is higher in younger children: 100% for up to age 10 years versus 70% to 80% for between ages 10 and 20 years. That said, the analysis failed to identify differences in childhood and adult melanoma, prompting the researchers to call for expanding this registry as well as for more rigorous collecting of information on the melanomas.

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Cancer  |  Nov 15, 2013

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Melanoma in Children is Rare—But Rising

Melanoma in Children is Rare—But Rising | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Melanoma, which currently accounts for 3% of cancers in children, is increasing by about 2% a year amongst newborns to 19-year-olds, according to a new study in Pediatrics. The researchers studied 1,230 white children and found that the biggest jump in melanoma rates was in those aged 15 to 19 years. Girls were particularly at-risk,and were more likely to have melanomas on their lower legs and hips. Boys were more likely to have melanomas on their faces and trunks. Melanoma is also on the rise in adults and the increase in this cancer among both children and adults may be driven by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or tanning beds. Doctors recommend frequent application of sunscreen that blocks both UV A and UV B rays and urge parents to watch for new or changing moles on their children.


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Medical Xpress│Apr 3, 2013

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