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Research impact and scholars’ geographical diversity

Research impact and scholars’ geographical diversity | Medicine, Health and Diverse Populations | Scoop.it

Abstract

In recent years there has been a sharp increase in collaborations among scholars and there are studies on the effects of scientific collaboration on scholars’ performance. This study examines the hypothesis that geographically diverse scientific collaboration is associated with research impact. Here, the approach is differentiated from other studies by: (a) focusing on publications rather than researchers or institutes; (b) considering the geographical diversity of authors of each publication; (c) considering the average number of citations a publication receives per year (time-based normalization of citations) as a surrogate for its impact; and (d) not focusing on a specific country (developed or developing) or region. Analysis of the collected bibliometric data shows that a publication impact is significantly and positively associated with all related geographical collaboration indicators. But publication impact has a stronger association with the numbers of external collaborations at department and institution levels (inter-departmental and inter-institutional collaborations) compared to internal collaborations. Conversely, national collaboration correlates better with impact than international collaboration.

 

 

The authors:"The fact that international collaboration has a lower correlation to publications’ impact may bedue to the apparent challenge of collaboration across national and cultural boundaries. The reason for intra-departmentalcollaboration’s low correlation to publications’ impact may be explained by exchanging redundant knowledge among theresearchers in the same departments (as usually have access to similar kinds of resources and equipment).Therefore, the findings support that having co-authors with diverse knowledge and skills enhance scholars’ knowledgeand experience through decreasing the research project process, including writing and revision process of publication (asthe output of the work) and also improving the impact."

 

Source:

 

Journal of Informetrics

Volume 7, Issue 3, July 2013, Pages 683–692

  Research impact and scholars’ geographical diversityAlireza Abbasi,   Ali Jaafarihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joi.2013.04.004,


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Marilyn Korhonen's comment, June 10, 2013 4:23 PM
The results reveal that research impact is positively associated with all levels of collaboration metrics. Thus, in general, the publications with more diverse authors (collaborations) have better impact especially if the collaborations are more external rather than internal, considering their affiliations’ departments and institutes but more internal collaborations considering their country.
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Available now: a guide to using Twitter in university research, teaching, and impact activities

Available now: a guide to using Twitter in university research, teaching, and impact activities | Medicine, Health and Diverse Populations | Scoop.it
Following on from the lists of academic tweeters published earlier this month, we have put together a short guide to using Twitter in university research, teaching, and impact activities, available...

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 17, 2014 9:24 AM

Available now: a guide to using Twitter in university research, teaching, and impact activities

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Achieving Impact in Research; a guide for the purposes of gaining research funding and reporting achieved impact for the Research Excellence Framework (REF)

Achieving Impact in Research; a guide for the purposes of gaining research funding and reporting achieved impact for the Research Excellence Framework (REF) | Medicine, Health and Diverse Populations | Scoop.it

This addition to the "Success in Research" series addresses the importance of understanding and achieving impact for the purposes of gaining research funding and reporting achieved impact for the Research Excellence Framework (REF).

 

The book includes contributions from researchers and researcher developers who feel that impact is ill-defined and poorly understood despite its prevalence in policy documents, websites and institutional activities. This succinct and cohesive text draws on the expert contributors' collective research practice, knowledge and experience.

 

Using a variety of examples, boxed activities and highlighted reflection points, this practical guide covers the following key areas:

 

- The meaning of impact in relation to research

 

- How the Impact Agenda fits with attitudes and ethics that motivate research

 

- The different characterisations of research impact and when impact is apparent

 

- How impact can be planned into proposals, evaluated and evidenced

 

- The skills needed to be an impactful researcher

 

- How impact can be supported through Knowledge Exchange and effective partnerships

 

Table of contents:

 

What is the meaning of impact in relation to research and why does it matter? A view from inside academia     
Colin Chandler

What is the meaning of the Impact Agenda - is it a repackaged or a new entity? Views from inside the Research Councils     
Sophie Payne-Gifford

How does the Impact Agenda fit with attitudes and ethics that motivate research?     
Jennifer Chubb

What are the different characteristics of research impact?     
Jo Lakey, Geoff Rodgers and Rosa Scoble

When might research impact be apparent?     
Christopher Wood

How can impact be planned into research proposals?     
Rob Daley and Sara Shinton

How can impact evaluation be planned?     
Tony Bromley and André de Campos

How can impact be evidenced: practical methods?     
Tony Bromley

What skills are needed to be an impactful researcher?     
Jennifer Chubb

How can knowledge exchange support the development of impact through partnerships and university infrastructures?     
Andy Jackson

How can you become an impactful researcher?     
Ellen Pearce and Pam Denicolo

Appendix I A special case: researcher development and the work of the impact and evaluation group     
Christopher Wood and Pam Denicolo

Appendix II An illustration of the Researcher Development Framework (Vitae)
    
Appendix III The pathways to impact framework provided by RCUK

 

source:

Achieving Impact in Research
Pam Denicolo     
October 2013, AGE Publications Ltd   
Series: Success in Research

 

 


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Marmot: What can doctors do about health inequalities?

Epidemiologist, Sir Michael Marmot, published a leading report on health inequalities, 'Fair Society, Healthy Lives' published in 2010. This is a very bshort interview with him about the main findings and what doctors can do. 


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New survey: Considerable gender, racial and sexuality differences in attitudes towards bisexuality

New survey: Considerable gender, racial and sexuality differences in attitudes towards bisexuality | Medicine, Health and Diverse Populations | Scoop.it
Considerable gender, racial and sexuality differences in attitudes toward ...
Science Codex
BOSTON, Nov.

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Jennifer Turner's curator insight, December 9, 2013 12:41 PM

Further explains about gender bais in younger children, really helpfull for DP!! 

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Guardian Higher Education Panel: The Impact of New Technologies on Academic Research

Guardian Higher Education Panel: The Impact of New Technologies on Academic Research | Medicine, Health and Diverse Populations | Scoop.it
Last Friday I broke my holiday up to take part as an invited panelist for a 3 hour Guardian Higher Education Panel about the impact of new technologies on academic research.

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How to evaluate individual researchers meaningfully and with a focus on excellence? A proposal for a set of indicators based on percentiles of citations

How to evaluate individual researchers meaningfully and with a focus on excellence? A proposal for a set of indicators based on percentiles of citations | Medicine, Health and Diverse Populations | Scoop.it

Abstract:

Although bibliometrics has been a separate research field for many years, there is still no uniformity in the way bibliometric analyses are applied to individual researchers. Therefore, this study aims to set up proposals how to evaluate individual researchers working in the natural and life sciences. 2005 saw the introduction of the h index, which gives information about a researcher's productivity and the impact of his or her publications in a single number (h is the number of publications with at least h citations); however, it is not possible to cover the multidimensional complexity of research performance and to undertake inter-personal comparisons with this number. This study therefore includes recommendations for a set of indicators to be used for evaluating researchers. Our proposals relate to the selection of data on which an evaluation is based, the analysis of the data and the presentation of the results.

 

The authors give a "handle with care" advice: " Scientists, who should be used to handling bibliometric data as end users, should be able to understand the limitations of the data and the risks that can result and it must be possible for them to call them to account. However this is often not the case: when money and reputation are at stake, scientists are also only human and forget the rules of good scientific practice. Bibliometric data is likely to be misinterpreted if this can benefit their positive image or completely ignored if it does not provide confirmation of scientists' perception of themselves. It might also be used as ammunition against competitors if it seems appropriate for this purpose. The danger of partiality presents anyone creating bibliometric data (the database producers) and undertaking bibliometric studies (the bibliometricians) with a special responsibility. The end users of the data are called upon to take the guidelines of both groups seriously to take account of the outcomes and relationships determined by bibliometric research over decades."

 

Source:

How to evaluate individual researchers working in the natural and life sciences meaningfully? A proposal of methods based on percentiles of citations.

Lutz Bornmann, Werner Marx

arXiv:1302.3697, 4 Oct 2013

Fulltext: http://arxiv.org/pdf/1302.3697v2

 


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WHO European review of social determinants of health and the health divide : The Lancet

WHO European review of social determinants of health and the health divide. By - Prof Sir Michael Marmot FRCPet al.

"Action is needed—on the social determinants of health, across the life course, and in wider social and economic spheres—to achieve greater health equity and protect future generations."

 


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The Unmeasured LGBT Life - Huffington Post

The Unmeasured LGBT Life - Huffington Post | Medicine, Health and Diverse Populations | Scoop.it
The Unmeasured LGBT Life Huffington Post In clinical settings—hospitals, health centers, senior settings and more—asking patients about their sexual orientations and gender identities helps create optimal, patient-centered care plans that account...
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