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3D printer and living "ink" create cartilage | ...

3D printer and living "ink" create cartilage | ... | medicine | Scoop.it
Lawrence Bonassar, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, describes a cutting-edge process he has developed in which he uses a 3D Printer and ...
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Vascular tissue engineering: the next generation.

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Cleary MA, Geiger E, Grady C, Best C, Naito Y, Breuer C.

"It is the ultimate goal of tissue engineering: an autologous tissue engineered vascular graft (TEVG) that is immunologically compatible, nonthrombogenic, and can grow and remodel. Currently, native vessels are the preferred vascular conduit for procedures such as coronary artery bypass (CABG) or peripheral bypass surgery. However, in many cases these are damaged, have already been harvested, or are simply unusable. The use of synthetic conduits is severely limited in smaller diameter vessels due to increased incidence of thrombosis, infection, and graft failure. Current research has therefore energetically pursued the development of a TEVG that can incorporate into a patient's circulatory system, mimic the vasoreactivity and biomechanics of the native vasculature, and maintain long-term patency."

 

 

http://1.usa.gov/TpZGrx


Via Gerd Moe-Behrens
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Tough hydrogel stretches to 21 times its length, recoils, and heals itself

Tough hydrogel stretches to 21 times its length, recoils, and heals itself | medicine | Scoop.it
A team of experts in mechanics, materials science, and tissue engineering at Harvard have created an extremely stretchy and tough gel that may pave the way to replacing damaged cartilage in human joints.

Via LeapMind
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Doctors want to put 3D printers on the surgeon's table

Doctors want to put 3D printers on the surgeon's table | medicine | Scoop.it

Via Jacob Blumenthal
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Jacob Blumenthal's curator insight, April 26, 2013 10:45 AM

Soon, 3D printers will become a standart surgical tool, and will allow to print & replace specific bone and cartilage segments duing surgery. This article describes the work of  dr. Lawrence J. Bonasser from Cornell university. He is working to develop a revolutionary new surgical procedure to repair spinal discs with the help of 3D printing.

Although it sounds science fiction, we are almost there...

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Targeted therapies of solid cancers: new options, new challenges

"Purpose of review: The landscape of medical oncology is filled with approvals of new anticancer agents, the majority of which are targeted agents. This shift in therapies raises multiple challenges including the appearance of new toxicities, the need for biomarkers, the emergence of genomics and the evolution of cancer molecular imaging."


Via Cancer Commons
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Cancer Commons's curator insight, March 20, 2013 6:29 PM

Awada A, Aftimos PG. Current Opinion in Oncology. Mar 13, 2013.

Cancer Commons's curator insight, March 20, 2013 6:29 PM

Awada A, Aftimos PG. Current Opinion in Oncology. Mar 13, 2013.

Cancer Commons's curator insight, March 20, 2013 6:29 PM

Awada A, Aftimos PG. Current Opinion in Oncology. Mar 13, 2013.

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Organovo – The Company Behind The First Commercial Bioprinter - 3D Printing Industry

Organovo – The Company Behind The First Commercial Bioprinter - 3D Printing Industry | medicine | Scoop.it
Organovo is a company that specialises in bioprinting – the laboratory engineering of tissue. Bioengineering is also the focus of several other universities and research instates.

Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
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Tissue engineering: Growing new organs, and more - MIT News Office

Tissue engineering: Growing new organs, and more - MIT News Office | medicine | Scoop.it

Via Gerd Moe-Behrens
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Gerd Moe-Behrens's curator insight, December 16, 2012 12:04 PM

by
Anne Trafton

"With the recent launch of MIT’s Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, MIT News examines research with the potential to reshape medicine and health care through new scientific knowledge, novel treatments and products, better management of medical data, and improvements in health-care delivery. 

 In the 1970s and 1980s, tissue engineers began working on growing replacement organs for transplantation into patients. While scientists are still targeting that goal, much of the tissue engineering research at MIT is also focused on creating tissue that can be used in the lab to model human disease and test potential new drugs. This kind of disease modeling could have a great impact in the near term, says MIT professor Sangeeta Bhatia, who is developing liver tissue to study hepatitis C and malaria infection.  

Like other human tissues, liver is difficult to grow outside the human body because cells tend to lose their function when they lose contact with neighboring cells. “The challenge is to grow the cells outside the body while maintaining their function after being removed from their usual microenvironment,” says Bhatia, the John and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Health Sciences and Technology and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science..." 

http://bit.ly/WgIp3B

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Bioengineers 3D print tiny functioning human liver (Wired UK)

Bioengineers 3D print tiny functioning human liver (Wired UK) | medicine | Scoop.it
A US biotechnology company has 3D printed a tiny functioning liver in the lab that survived just over five days -- more than twice the life expectancy of 2D versions (RT @paulkidd: Scients!

Via Jacob Blumenthal
Ophir Vermesh's insight:

3D printing of organs is the way of the future, especially once they can achieve single cell resolution, which probably isn't too far off.

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Jacob Blumenthal's curator insight, April 27, 2013 8:45 AM

A US biotechnology company has 3D printed a tiny functioning liver in the lab that survived just over five days -- more than twice the life expectancy of 2D versions.The company explained that although we're still a long way off bioprinting a complex transplantable human liver, creating a tiny model in the lab could be key in tackling liver diseases.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=s3CiJ26YS_U

Carlos Garcia Pando's comment, April 28, 2013 3:21 PM
http://ir.organovo.com/news/press-releases/press-releases-details/2013/Organovo-Describes-First-Fully-Cellular-3D-Bioprinted-Liver-Tissue/default.aspx