Medicina privada
84 views | +0 today
Follow
Medicina privada
Medicina privada
Curated by ACES
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by ACES from The New Patient-Doctor e-Relationship
Scoop.it!

Quantifying the digital health revolution

A presentation delivered by Stephen Davies at the Fitness Writers' Association in London, UK


Via bacigalupe, Camilo Erazo
more...
Camilo Erazo's curator insight, January 25, 2013 7:35 AM

Doctors will have to deal with a minority of 'super-engaged' patients who attempt to control their bodies through data gathering, analysis and visualization. Are they ready for it?

rob halkes's comment, January 25, 2013 8:39 AM
Personal communication styles have always been around. My hypothesis is that the higher the impact of the health condition and the more vulnerable therapy compliance is (e.g. in (breast) cancer, HIV), the more motivation for patients to tend to issues in coping with their conditions. So, let's not desire to 'connect' all patients, but start to try and learn. Culture and styles of doing care is a learning process..;-)
Rowan Norrie's curator insight, February 16, 2013 5:52 AM

Now is the time of biology, technology and big data! Great overview to show how we are now able to measure billions of datapoints about ourselves, track, analyse and take action accordingly.

Rescooped by ACES from The New Patient-Doctor e-Relationship
Scoop.it!

Discussions: Physician Ethics and Inappropriate Access to Medical Records

How does one prevent snooping of patient records through a hospital, regional or local clinical information system?

 

(...) "The Medical Post article describes a situation in which an Edmonton physician at the Misericordia Hospital accessed the medical records of three patients with whom she did not have a physician relationship. The access took place via a hospital computer after a colleague failed to log out of a computer terminal. The disciplinary action was brought against the physician by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta and it was found that she was aware of the inappropriate access as well as the fact that she would not leave a fingerprint trace of her access as she used another physician's login to access the records.

 

This is one of those potentially avoidable situations that is unfortunate for both the patients and the perpetrating physician. After the fact identification of privacy breaches are the norm in today's world, in large part because the mechanisms to identify inappropriate actions generally take place through either a complaints or post-event audit process. It is very difficult to avoid breaches such as this particular example which appears to have had a calculated element to it, although the physician in question did not 'disclose or make use of the information' in any way. In addition to the fine, the physician received a 60 day suspension and was also ordered to attend an ethics class." (...)


Via Camilo Erazo
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ACES from The New Patient-Doctor e-Relationship
Scoop.it!

Removing The Red Tape From Patient Records - Forbes

Removing The Red Tape From Patient Records - Forbes | Medicina privada | Scoop.it
Consumers have become accustomed to using smart phones for self-managing many aspects of their daily lives but still lack access to their own healthcare data.

 

 


Via Camilo Erazo
more...
Camilo Erazo's curator insight, April 4, 2013 7:19 AM

"The time for giving patients access to their electronic medical records has come."


(...)


"Currently, only one in five U.S. doctors allow patients to have online access to their medical summary or patient chart—the most basic form of a patient’s record. Most resistance stems from two concerns. The first is the concern that doctors will be inundated with questions from patients regarding their health, while the second is a concern that if given the opportunity, patients will change valuable information in their record.


Some health systems have proven that the benefits of allowing patients to have access to their records can actually outweigh the risks. According to a recent  Robert Wood Johnson Foundation study,  when given the opportunity to review their medical notes, the majority of patients at three health systems reported a better understanding of their health conditions, felt more in-control of their care and had an improved doctor-patient relationship. Furthermore, patients did not create additional risk or an excessive burden. In fact, patients became a helpful part of the record-keeping process, and furthermore, increased their understanding of their own conditions and improved adherence to care protocols. Their outlook improved when they were engaged in the process." (...)

Rescooped by ACES from Salud y Social Media
Scoop.it!

A Social Network for Crohn’s Disease | MIT Technology Review

A Social Network for Crohn’s Disease | MIT Technology Review | Medicina privada | Scoop.it
Patients are collaborating for better health — and, just maybe, radically reduced health-care costs.

Via Valentina Jaramillo
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ACES from The New Patient-Doctor e-Relationship
Scoop.it!

Why Medicine Will Be More Like Walmart | MIT Technology Review

Why Medicine Will Be More Like Walmart | MIT Technology Review | Medicina privada | Scoop.it
What health care will look like after the information technology revolution.

Via Camilo Erazo
more...
Camilo Erazo's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:40 AM

"Who treats us, and where, will change as well. With an electronic backbone in place, one doesn’t need to see a doctor for every issue. There is little the primary care doctor does that can’t—and increasingly isn’t—being done by a nurse practitioner, perhaps at a clinic in a Walmart or CVS. Routine prescriptions for medication refills can be handled online, with an electronic doctor watching. Even high-end services can be spread widely, with specialized centers coördinating the treatment of patients far from its walls." (...)


"Information technology is going to change the game because it will affect how people view themselves, their illness, and the people who care for them. Amazon’s loyalty comes in no small part because it uses our past searches and the searches of people like us to predict what we will want. The customer is part of Amazon’s Memex. Health care will be less frustrating when the power shifts from sellers to buyers, and when patients are more in charge."


Dystopic, yet... credible?

Scooped by ACES
Scoop.it!

Consejos para los profesionales que se inician en las redes sociales

Consejos para los profesionales que se inician en las redes sociales | Medicina privada | Scoop.it
La importancia de la comunicación 2.0 en Salud para construir una reputación positiva, reforzar las relaciones profesionales y mejorar la práctica médica es una constante en este blog. Afortunadamente, cada vez mayor número de ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ACES
Scoop.it!

Salud personal: tomarse un café y disfrutarlo también · El Nuevo ...

Salud personal: tomarse un café y disfrutarlo también · El Nuevo ... | Medicina privada | Scoop.it
Salud personal: tomarse un café y disfrutarlo también. El beneficio que se observó en el estudio por consumir café no fue enorme – la tasa de mortalidad entre los bebedores de café fue 10 a 15 por ciento menor que la ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ACES
Scoop.it!

Alerta en Holanda por miles de marcapasos defectuosos

Alerta Holanda miles marcapasos defectuosos Ámsterdam/Minessota (EE.UU.).
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ACES
Scoop.it!

Descienden las muertes por cáncer en Estados Unidos

Descienden las muertes por cáncer en Estados Unidos | Medicina privada | Scoop.it
Las muertes por cáncer siguen descendiendo en Estados Unidos, un 1,8 por ciento entre los hombres y en un 1,6 por ciento entre las mujeres, y también la incidencia global de esta enfermedad, que ha bajado ligeramente (en un 0,6% anual) en los...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ACES
Scoop.it!

RunRun.es - » Prueba de sangre que predice riesgo de Alzheimer

RunRun.es - » Prueba de sangre que predice riesgo de Alzheimer | Medicina privada | Scoop.it
Prueba de sangre que predice riesgo de Alzheimer - http://t.co/FLVfIbwJ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ACES
Scoop.it!

La revolución tecnológica en medicina y salud – entrevista | TICbeat

La revolución tecnológica en medicina y salud – entrevista | TICbeat | Medicina privada | Scoop.it
Entrevista a Chia Hwu sobre el impacto de la revolución tecnológica en la medicina y la salud.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ACES
Scoop.it!

SANIDAD. Los juzgados confirman que las denuncias de los afectados por el Servicio de Cirugía Cardiaca del HUC no han prescrito | elblogoferoz.com

SANIDAD. Los juzgados confirman que las denuncias de los afectados por el Servicio de Cirugía Cardiaca del HUC no han prescrito | elblogoferoz.com | Medicina privada | Scoop.it
EBF: SANIDAD. Los juzgados confirman que las denuncias de los afectados por el Servicio de Cirugía Cardiaca del ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ACES
Scoop.it!

Escuchar música puede mejorar la salud del corazón - ∴ A Tu Salud ∴

Escuchar música puede mejorar la salud del corazón - ∴ A Tu Salud ∴ | Medicina privada | Scoop.it
Escuchar música puede mejorar la salud del corazón http://t.co/EgzHDNHX #ATuSalud #Corazón"...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ACES from The New Patient-Doctor e-Relationship
Scoop.it!

Going from Patient to E-Patient | HealthWorks Collective

Going from Patient to E-Patient | HealthWorks Collective | Medicina privada | Scoop.it
Engaged patients – those who actively seek to know more about and manage their own health – are more likely than others to participate in preventive and healthy practices, self-manage their conditions and achieve better outcomes.

Via Camilo Erazo
more...
Camilo Erazo's curator insight, February 21, 2013 5:43 PM

Wishfully-thinkfully...

Rescooped by ACES from The New Patient-Doctor e-Relationship
Scoop.it!

GMC guidance: Doctors online should reveal their identity

GMC guidance: Doctors online should reveal their identity | Medicina privada | Scoop.it

Via Camilo Erazo
more...
Camilo Erazo's curator insight, March 28, 2013 9:15 AM

(...) "Yesterday, March 25th the GMC published the updated version of Good Medical Practice.  And for the first time, supplementary explanatory guidance on the use of social media is also included. The "doctors and social media" guidance was issued in draft last year, was relatively uncontroversial and didn't provoke a lot of discussion.This is what I wrote prior to the publication of the draft guidance.

One line in the final version has received a lot of attention on the twittersphere : "If you identify yourself as a doctor in publicly
accessible social media, you should also identify yourself by name."

Final
17  If you identify yourself as a doctor in publicly accessible social media, you should also identify yourself by name.Any material written by authors who represent themselves as doctors is likely to be taken on trust and may reasonably be taken to represent the views of the profession more widely.


18  You should also be aware that content uploaded anonymously can, in many cases, be traced back to its point of origin." (...)


CE: Indeed.

Rescooped by ACES from The New Patient-Doctor e-Relationship
Scoop.it!

What’s keeping your doctor off Twitter

What’s keeping your doctor off Twitter | Medicina privada | Scoop.it
Patients are actively looking to engage their physicians online, but doctors aren't too keen on the idea. What's the big fuss?

 

(...) "Q: Privacy seems to be a big concern among physicians. Should doctors be friends with patients on Facebook?

 

Pho: The short answer is no. There is information on personal Facebook profiles that physicians may not necessarily want their patients to know about—pictures of their children, what they did on vacation, what they do after hours. Allowing patients access to a personal physician’s profile has the potential to blur the line between a professional doctor-patient relationship and one that brims on being too personal.

 

Instead, I advocate a “dual citizenship” method that separates a personal and professional online identity. It’s an approach that professional medical societies endorse, such as the Federation of State Medical Boards. Physicians can still maintain their personal profile on Facebook, but restrict access to it to close friends and family members.

 

Then they should have a separate Facebook Page for their practice that is open to the public. Doctors should maintain a professional demeanor on this page, and use it to connect with patients, share stories about the practice, and guide the public to reputable health information on the web. An increasing number of patients get health information on Facebook, so it’s important for physicians to have a presence there. A professional Facebook page is an ideal way to do so." (...)


Via Camilo Erazo
more...
Camilo Erazo's curator insight, April 4, 2013 7:37 AM

Good advice from @KevinMD

Rescooped by ACES from Salud y Social Media
Scoop.it!

De qué le sirve a un profesional de la salud ser 2.0

De qué le sirve a un profesional de la salud ser 2.0 | Medicina privada | Scoop.it

La mayoría de los congresos y simposios de Medicina, Enfermería y Farmacia incluyen ya ponencias sobre salud 2.0 y la necesidad de dirigirse a los pacientes empoderados a través de los canales de comunicación que ofrece Internet, como las redes sociales y los blogs. Sin embargo, todavía son minoría los que mantienen una presencia activa en redes. ¿Qué falla?

Uno de los pediatras más activos en redes sociales, el doctor Jesús Garrido @mpediatraonline, hacía esta semana una defensa de la actitud 2.0 en su blog. Se trata de una declaración de principios que podría suscribir cualquier profesional de la salud comprometido con su profesión y que quiera poner su granito de arena a la mejora de los pacientes.

 

Tras tuitearlo, se abrió un interesante debate en Twitter sobre cuál era la actitud que debía tener el profesional de la salud ante el paciente empoderado, que se informa, comparte experiencias, pregunta y toma decisiones sobre su propia salud.

 

Coincido con el doctor Garrido, la actitud 2.0 surge cuando sabe dónde están los pacientes. Y los pacientes están en la consulta pero también en su casa, en la calle, en sus trabajos…, en cualquier parte. Sin embargo, hay algo va siempre con casi todos ellos, el móvil. España se ha convertido en el país europeo con mayor penetración de ‘smartphones’, un 66%, mientras que la media con los países de nuestro entorno (Inglaterra, Francia, Italia, Alemania) es del 57%, según el informe Spain Digital Future in Focus de comScore.

El móvil es ya el principal punto de acceso a Internet para los jóvenes y cada vez más para los no tan jóvenes. Parece obvio, por tanto, que si queremos acercarnos a los pacientes actuales y potenciales debemos extender la consulta más allá de sus barreras físicas. Se ha demostrado que los médicos que tienen mejor reputación digital atraen más pacientes. Un dermatólogo 2.0, el doctor Sergio Vaño (@SergioVanoG) me comentaba en una presentación que desde que empezó a escribir en el blog de la clínica que comparte con otros especialistas en dermatología, su consulta se llenaba, porque los pacientes pedían cita específicamente con él.

Sin embargo, para quienes trabajan en un centro público, ¿qué motivaciones tienen? Algunos, como el doctor Salvador Casado (@doctorcasado) creen que forma parte del compromiso del médico con sus pacientes, y así lo establecen en su blog. Por su parte, el doctor José Antonio Trujillo (@JoseATrujillo) cuenta en su blog cómo la marca personal es clave para que un profesional, también de la medicina pública, dé a conocer lo que hace y qué le convierte en diferente.

Ningún profesional es inmune a su reputación, online y offline. Ser respetado en un área te atrae más pacientes pero también mayor reconocimiento en tu profesión y la posibilidad de interaccionar con otros profesionales destacados de los que seguir aprendiendo. Y esa reputación no se construye teniendo una cuenta semidormida de Twitter y otra de Facebook. Requiere aportar conocimiento y servicio, a los pacientes y a otros profesionales. Lo que siempre se ha hecho en presencia del paciente, solo que ahora el paciente también está tras una pantalla.


Via COM SALUD, Valentina Jaramillo
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ACES
Scoop.it!

SocialBiblio, presente en “La Salud en tiempos 2.0: ahora sí toca ...

SocialBiblio, presente en “La Salud en tiempos 2.0: ahora sí toca ... | Medicina privada | Scoop.it
La ponencia, titulada “El profesional de la información, al servicio de la salud 2.0” trató sobre sus experiencias diversas en el uso de las herramientas de la web 2.0 aplicadas a la salud, como la puesta en marcha de la ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ACES
Scoop.it!

Mapfre, la aseguradora europea que mas incrementó su volumen ...

Mapfre, la aseguradora europea que mas incrementó su volumen ... | Medicina privada | Scoop.it
La aseguradora española Mapfre se ha erigido como la primera entidad europea que más ha visto incrementar su volumen de primas en el seguro No Vida en 2011, hasta los 14.473 millones de euros (+13,4%), según se ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ACES
Scoop.it!

Tecnologías móviles para la salud (mHealth) « Medicina, Historia y ...

Tecnologías móviles para la salud (mHealth) « Medicina, Historia y ... | Medicina privada | Scoop.it
Su objetivo es la mejora del acceso e intercambio global, regional y de países específicos a los conocimientos sobre salud pública, en especial sobre planificación familiar y salud reproductiva. El auge de las nuevas ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ACES
Scoop.it!

Juguetes seguros, para la salud física y mental de los niños - 20minutos.es - El medio social

Juguetes seguros, para la salud física y mental de los niños - 20minutos.es - El medio social | Medicina privada | Scoop.it
Sanidad aconseja comprar solo juguetes seguros con la etiqueta CE. Las piezas pequeñas desmontables podrían producir la asfixia del niño. Los embalajes, especialmente los de plástico, pueden suponer riesgo de asfixia.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ACES
Scoop.it!

Sistema de salud pagará el retiro de implantes PIP - eltiempo.com

Sistema de salud pagará el retiro de implantes PIP - eltiempo.com | Medicina privada | Scoop.it
Pero el costo de nuevas implantes no será cubierto, si se trata de procedimientos estéticos. (PRÓTESIS MAMARIAS.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ACES
Scoop.it!

Sanidad estima en un 15% las estancias hospitalarias que son ... - El Mundo.es

Sanidad estima en un 15% las estancias hospitalarias que son ... - El Mundo.es | Medicina privada | Scoop.it
La RazónSanidad estima en un 15% las estancias hospitalarias que son ...El Mundo.esLa Consejería de Sanidad calcula que el 15% de las estancias hospitalarias en la Comunidad no serían necesarias con una gestión más eficaz.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ACES
Scoop.it!

Rajoy anuncia una Ley de Servicios Básicos en Sanidad - correofarmaceutico.com

Rajoy anuncia una Ley de Servicios Básicos en Sanidad - correofarmaceutico.com | Medicina privada | Scoop.it
RT @CFarmaceutico: #Rajoy anuncia una Ley de Servicios Básicos para #Sanidad http://t.co/nmAQIvnJ Lea en CF el discurso de #investidura del nuevo pte.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ACES
Scoop.it!

Cómo trabajar los problemas del asma a través del ejercicio físico - utilidad.com

Cómo trabajar los problemas del asma a través del ejercicio físico - utilidad.com | Medicina privada | Scoop.it
SALUD DEPORTIVA: Cómo trabajar los problemas del asma a través del ejercicio físico http://t.co/iGlTo2ex...
more...
No comment yet.