Medical translation
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What does IntelliWebSearch do?

Pressing a convenient shortcut key combination:
1. copies selected text from virtually any Windows application, such as your translation environment tool;
2. opens your default browser (or another browser of your choice) and sends the copied text to one or more preset search engines, on-line dictionaries or on-line encyclopaedias together with other customizable instructions which limit the search according to the advanced search options available for the search engine, dictionary or encyclopaedia chosen. Alternatively it can send the same text and instructions to local dictionaries on CD-ROM or installed on your hard disk.

Another convenient shortcut key combination copies any text selected in your browser or local dictionary (the solution to your terminology problem) and returns to the original application, where you can choose to paste it in using the application's own paste function.

All this saves the busy translator, terminologist, interpreter, editor or lexicographer an enormous amount of time.


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(ES) (EN) (PDF) - El lenguaje médico y quirúrgico / Medical and surgical language | elsevier.es

(ES) (EN) (PDF) - El lenguaje médico y quirúrgico / Medical and surgical language | elsevier.es | Medical translation | Scoop.it

El lenguaje médico adolece de numerosos vicios. Uno de ellos es el uso de voces cultas o elegantes sin conocer su correcto significado. Un segundo error es el recurso a extranjerismos, sobre todo anglicismos, tanto en su grafía original (extranjerismo crudo) como castellanizada (voz adaptada); un modo solapado de extranjerismo lo constituyen los llamados ¿calcos¿. En tercer lugar está el uso de vocablos inexistentes en castellano, los palabros. Finalmente, no siempre se acentúa correctamente las palabras. En el presente trabajo se muestra algunos ejemplos de dichos errores, y se orienta sobre el uso adecuado del lenguaje.

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Medical language contains many faults. One of them is the use of cultured and elegant words without knowing its proper significance. A second error is the recourse to using foreign words or phrases (foreignisms), particularly Anglicisms, both in their original spelling (raw foreignisms) and Hispanicised (adapted word); an overlapping mode of foreignism are so-called ¿calques¿ or loan translations. Thirdly, there is the use of words that do not exist in Spanish, palabros. Finally, the words are not correctly pronounced. In this article some examples of these errors are demonstrated and it is directed towards the appropriate use of language.


Via Stefano KaliFire
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Stefano KaliFire's curator insight, April 17, 2015 11:02 AM

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Patricia Torres's comment, May 6, 2015 8:27 PM
Interesante... aunque no de Fernando Navarro. En este portal se pueden hacer búsquedas de artículos por autor. Busqué a Navarro y encontré varias cosas interesantes, como este: http://www.elsevier.es/es-revista-actas-dermo-sifiliogrficas-103-articulo-ciento-cincuenta-palabras-expresiones-inglesas-13120365?referer=buscador
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(ES)-(EN)-(PDF) – Glosario crítico inglés-español de documentos de consentimiento informado | Pablo Mugüerza, Lida Barbetti Vros y Lorenzo Gallego-Borghini

"La traducción de documentos de consentimiento para ensayos clínicos entraña varias dificultades. En primer lugar, el lector de estos documentos es un paciente —algunas veces enfermo de gravedad y para quien la participación en un ensayo clínico es su única esperanza de encontrar una cura— o un voluntario que se ofrece como sujeto de un experimento, poniendo en riesgo su salud y su bienestar físico. En el primer caso, no se encuentra en las mejores condiciones para leer y comprender un documento de este tipo; en ambos casos, debe saber a qué se expone. Además, los consentimientos incluyen términos de diversas áreas: médicos, farmacéuticos, bioquímicos, estadísticos, administrativos y jurídicos, lo que dificulta su comprensión. Por lo tanto, es imprescindible que la traducción sea lo más clara y fácil de leer posible, que no abunde en palabrerío superfluo y que explique los conceptos con sencillez y exactitud en un lenguaje que un lego pueda entender. Palabras clave: traducción, consentimiento informado, información para el paciente

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Translating informed consent documents for clinical trials poses several difficulties. First, these documents are intended for patients—sometimes severely ill patients for whom taking part in a clinical trial is the last hope to find a cure—or healthy subjects who volunteer to undergo an experiment, putting their health and physical well-being at risk. In the first case, readers are not in the best condition to understand these documents; in both cases, readers need to know what they are exposing themselves to. Second, informed consent documents include terms from a wide variety of fields: medical, pharmaceutical, biochemical, statistical, administrative, and legal, which makes them more difficult to understand. It is therefore essential that the translation be as clear and reader-friendly as possible, with no unnecessary verbiage, and that concepts be explained plainly and accurately, in a language that the layperson can understand. Key words: translation, informed consent form, patient information ..."


Via Stefano KaliFire
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5 great resources for medical translation research

5 great resources for medical translation research | Medical translation | Scoop.it
Researching medical terminology is a big and important part of every medical translator's professional life. There are hundreds of resources for medical translators online - for different language pairs and different areas of ...
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Don't get lost when searching for medical references.

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How to Prioritize Content for Translation

How to Prioritize Content for Translation | Medical translation | Scoop.it
The following are tips on prioritizing content for translation in order to facilitate product or service launch on time and on budget. In existence to help its clients grow, Teneo Linguistics Company, LLC, is a full service translation company headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas.

Fort Worth, Texas (PRWEB) November 12, 2015

By the time companies plan a new product launch abroad, they typically have already gathered lots of content in their home market. Just as translating into multiple languages right away can be overwhelming, attempting to translate everything at once is a sure path to a costly failure. Here are a few suggestions on how to prioritize content while keeping cost under control:

1.    Sales & Marketing

Any content that supports sales of the actual product is typically critical for success. Think website content, any marketing collateral, and campaigns needed to promote the product in question. The consideration should be how to capture interest that results from distributing translated content. After someone reads information on a website in French, they will feel like they can send an email with an inquiry in French.

2.    Legal Content

This is the fine print and details customers need to understand so that a sale can be completed in compliance with any legal regulations in the target market. Agreements, contracts, disclaimers, forms and any other legal notices will fall into this category. Is the product regulated, like medical devices or pharmaceutical products? A proficient translation vendor should be able to help navigate the target regulatory environment as well.

3.    Product Literature

Technical documentation, user manuals, instructions for use, packaging inserts and packaging itself all fall under product literature that needs to be translated for customers once business is secured. If the product is software, consider translating (localizing) user interface as well.

How to Minimize Risk:
    Avoid falling into the trap of free online translation. There is only one chance at a good impression and free online translation engines typically do not help in that regard.
    Check that product names do not have negative connotations in the target language.
    Stay in control of core messaging. Avoid using “local” resources like distributors and/or bilingual employees. Rely on professionals who have built their careers in translation
    Use one vendor for all languages to maximize consistency and savings.
Sometimes business owners wonder if they need to translate at all. The rest of the world seems to speak English, after all. The answer is, unmistakably, that translation should take place whenever possible. Even if someone speaks perfect English, they are psychologically much more likely to be attracted to a product/service if it is presented to them in their mother tongue. Plus, taking the extra step toward a customer and meeting them in the middle represents a valuable competitive advantage.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/11/prweb13075115.htm

The following are tips on prioritizing content for translation in order to facilitate product or service launch on time and on budget. In existence to help its clients grow, Teneo Linguistics Company, LLC, is a full service translation company headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas.

Fort Worth, Texas (PRWEB) November 12, 2015

By the time companies plan a new product launch abroad, they typically have already gathered lots of content in their home market. Just as translating into multiple languages right away can be overwhelming, attempting to translate everything at once is a sure path to a costly failure. Here are a few suggestions on how to prioritize content while keeping cost under control:

1.    Sales & Marketing

Any content that supports sales of the actual product is typically critical for success. Think website content, any marketing collateral, and campaigns needed to promote the product in question. The consideration should be how to capture interest that results from distributing translated content. After someone reads information on a website in French, they will feel like they can send an email with an inquiry in French.

2.    Legal Content

This is the fine print and details customers need to understand so that a sale can be completed in compliance with any legal regulations in the target market. Agreements, contracts, disclaimers, forms and any other legal notices will fall into this category. Is the product regulated, like medical devices or pharmaceutical products? A proficient translation vendor should be able to help navigate the target regulatory environment as well.

3.    Product Literature

Technical documentation, user manuals, instructions for use, packaging inserts and packaging itself all fall under product literature that needs to be translated for customers once business is secured. If the product is software, consider translating (localizing) user interface as well.

How to Minimize Risk:
    Avoid falling into the trap of free online translation. There is only one chance at a good impression and free online translation engines typically do not help in that regard.
    Check that product names do not have negative connotations in the target language.
    Stay in control of core messaging. Avoid using “local” resources like distributors and/or bilingual employees. Rely on professionals who have built their careers in translation
    Use one vendor for all languages to maximize consistency and savings.
Sometimes business owners wonder if they need to translate at all. The rest of the world seems to speak English, after all. The answer is, unmistakably, that translation should take place whenever possible. Even if someone speaks perfect English, they are psychologically much more likely to be attracted to a product/service if it is presented to them in their mother tongue. Plus, taking the extra step toward a customer and meeting them in the middle represents a valuable competitive advantage.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/11/prweb13075115.htm

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(TOOL)-(EN)-(ES) - In Search of the Right Equivalents for Medical Terms: Dictionaries, Forums, Parallel Texts, etc. | Silvia Schrage (Caduceus)

(TOOL)-(EN)-(ES) - In Search of the Right Equivalents for Medical Terms: Dictionaries, Forums, Parallel Texts, etc. | Silvia Schrage (Caduceus) | Medical translation | Scoop.it

"Caduceus is the semi-annual publication of the Medical Division of the American Translators Association.

 

When translating terms that refer to life-threatening conditions, finding the correct equivalent is especially crucial. Unfortunately, it’s not always easy.

During a translation project, the term “stroke” came under intense scrutiny at a review session that included translators, interpreters, doctors and community representatives. One interpreter suggested the translation “embolia”; another preferred “derrame cerebral” (cerebral hemorrhage). A third interpreter pointed out that both “embolia” and “derrame cerebral” were kinds of strokes, but the problem was that they had different or even opposite causes. Commonly-used references may yield translations for a wide variety of synonyms, superordinates or hypernyms, and hyponyms [defined later in this article]: embolism, brain hemorrhage, paralysis attack, sudden attack, brain attack ..."


Via Stefano KaliFire
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(ES)-(EN)-(PDF) – Glosario crítico inglés-español de documentos de consentimiento informado | Pablo Mugüerza, Lida Barbetti Vros y Lorenzo Gallego-Borghini

"La traducción de documentos de consentimiento para ensayos clínicos entraña varias dificultades. En primer lugar, el lector de estos documentos es un paciente —algunas veces enfermo de gravedad y para quien la participación en un ensayo clínico es su única esperanza de encontrar una cura— o un voluntario que se ofrece como sujeto de un experimento, poniendo en riesgo su salud y su bienestar físico. En el primer caso, no se encuentra en las mejores condiciones para leer y comprender un documento de este tipo; en ambos casos, debe saber a qué se expone. Además, los consentimientos incluyen términos de diversas áreas: médicos, farmacéuticos, bioquímicos, estadísticos, administrativos y jurídicos, lo que dificulta su comprensión. Por lo tanto, es imprescindible que la traducción sea lo más clara y fácil de leer posible, que no abunde en palabrerío superfluo y que explique los conceptos con sencillez y exactitud en un lenguaje que un lego pueda entender. Palabras clave: traducción, consentimiento informado, información para el paciente

--------------------------------

Translating informed consent documents for clinical trials poses several difficulties. First, these documents are intended for patients—sometimes severely ill patients for whom taking part in a clinical trial is the last hope to find a cure—or healthy subjects who volunteer to undergo an experiment, putting their health and physical well-being at risk. In the first case, readers are not in the best condition to understand these documents; in both cases, readers need to know what they are exposing themselves to. Second, informed consent documents include terms from a wide variety of fields: medical, pharmaceutical, biochemical, statistical, administrative, and legal, which makes them more difficult to understand. It is therefore essential that the translation be as clear and reader-friendly as possible, with no unnecessary verbiage, and that concepts be explained plainly and accurately, in a language that the layperson can understand. Key words: translation, informed consent form, patient information ..."


Via Stefano KaliFire
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Stefano KaliFire's curator insight, March 6, 2013 7:03 AM

PDF 16 pages

Sonia Tirado's curator insight, March 23, 2016 4:54 AM

PDF 16 pages