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The Medical Futurist: Nanorobots: Where We Are Today and Why Their Future Has Amazing Potential.

The Medical Futurist: Nanorobots: Where We Are Today and Why Their Future Has Amazing Potential. | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it
This post is a status update on one of the most powerful tools humanity will ever create: nanotechnology (or nanotech). My goal here is to give you a quick overview of... read more
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Comment on The World in 2025: 8 Predictions for the Next 10 Years by roel_castelein@yahoo.com

Comment on The World in 2025: 8 Predictions for the Next 10 Years by roel_castelein@yahoo.com | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it
Great thinking. But all this digitalisation requires massive amounts of energy, which will not be available. ICT is fastest and most energy hungry industry in the world, 3-6 % global energy consumption and growing fast.
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GEN | News Highlights:Spider Web Protein Provides Stable Substrate for Growing Heart Cells

GEN | News Highlights:Spider Web Protein Provides Stable Substrate for Growing Heart Cells | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it
Researchers at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) report that genetically engineered fibers of the protein spidroin has proven to be a perfect substrate for cultivating heart tissue cells.

 

GEN article: http://www.genengnews.com/gen-news-highlights/spider-web-protein-provides-stable-substrate-for-growing-heart-cells/81251139/

 

PLOS ONE paper: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0121155


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msemporda's curator insight, April 14, 2015 8:04 AM

As this article & paper outline, one of the challenges facing regenerative cell based treatments is the development of appropriate support niches to mimic optimal natural environments for the survival and proliferation of cell populations - either cultured ex-vivo then placed in-vivo or placed in-vivo directly, as a injectable or otherwise. Either way the assistance of biomaterials engineered for the purpose and optimized for the cell type(s) is fast becomes a critical component of the development landscape.

 

In certain cases free floating cell suspension products administered to the site of injury, or systemically for distal effect, is perhaps sufficient and preferred. However, there are many instances where a more robust and structural fabric or support is required which necessitate bio-material integration. 

 

A novel approach to this topic is outlined in this Russian study where a synthetic protein was spun into a cell supportive fabric. The versatile and stronger than steel biomatrix was conceived from studying the structural nature of spider's web. The result being a home where heart cells thrive...

 

Application specific uses of bio-fabricated methods to support cells are becoming numerous and inventive - so much so that this support structure in itself is proving to be a mini-industrial sector within the space.

 

When you combine the unique properties of bio-engineered structures, proprietary potent cell derivatives, genetics and supportive biologic products you have the makings of a deep tool-kit capable of delivering numerous bespoke iterations for superior clinical translation. 

 

The companies and partnerships groups that are structured to realize this will have a distinct competitive advantage to interlock unique product attributes and lead.

 

Cheers

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Scientists film death of white blood cell for first time and discover alert system

From www.theguardian.com - June 15, 11:29 AM

 

"Australian and US scientists capture on video each stage of death of a human white blood cell, revealing that dying cells apparently try to alert their neighbours

 

..........."

 

Article: http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/jun/15/scientists-film-death-of-white-blood-cell-for-first-time-and-discover-alert-system


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msemporda's curator insight, June 16, 2015 4:19 PM

Intercellular communication has been a keen focus of researchers for some time now. How the cells of our body manage the myriad of complex system actions and reactions is still largely being discovered. The world within I would imaging is somewhat akin to a person walking through a busy city during rush hour while being cerebrally wired head to toe with bidirectional sense nodes, carrying a backpack full of a variety of biological iCookies and a mission impossible travel kit.

 

The latest snapshot of this scifi world comes courtesy of advanced photo imagery of our citizen's dramatic finale. Here the sequence shows a white blood cell going through a transformation and cell signaling metamorphosis before dying. John Carpenter would be proud - the real Thing!

 

The hypothesis here is that cell death isn't entirely random but in certain cases it is a communication event. Nature's self defense system is impressive and highly developed, on all levels great and small.

 

If a stem cell derivative can be injected systemically and have a distal effect on disease without cell migration then that is powerful - especially if it can be isolated and a biologic made.

 

Cheers

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Koch Institute spin-out MicroCHIPS Bio. secures Pharma partnership to commercialize drug delivery tech.

Koch Institute spin-out MicroCHIPS Bio. secures Pharma partnership to commercialize drug delivery tech. | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it

Rob Matheson | MIT News Office 
June 29, 2015

 

Major step for implantable drug-delivery device. MIT spinout signs deal to commercialize microchips that release therapeutics inside the body.

 

An implantable, microchip-based device may soon replace the injections and pills now needed to treat chronic diseases: Earlier this month, MIT spinout Microchips Biotech partnered with a pharmaceutical giant to commercialize its wirelessly controlled, implantable, microchip-based devices that store and release drugs inside the body over many years.

 

......

 

MIT News article: http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2015/implantable-drug-delivery-microchip-device-0629

 


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msemporda's curator insight, July 1, 2015 7:19 AM

The Koch Institute at MIT is a hotbed of activity these days. One of the more recent spin-outs from this diverse innovative brain trust is work by Robert Langer and Michael Cima labs to productize a novel drug delivery technology that can be administered as a platform for long term patient medication. 

 

Teva Pharma paid $35 million upfront plus milestones to collaborate on developing the technology. A significant validation which points to a future patient centric solution for easily controllable - wireless! - self contained treatments of up to 16 years.

 

An in-development birth control chip is being worked on with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

 

The power of thought and practical innovation...

 

Cheers

 

Refs: Microchips tech: http://microchipsbiotech.com/technology.php

Michael Cima lab video: http://ki.mit.edu/people/insidethelab/cima

Cima lab's Sensing Cancer video: http://ki.mit.edu/approach/animations/cima

 

 

 

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Researchers feed white blood cells micro-lasers causing them to produce light

Researchers feed white blood cells micro-lasers causing them to produce light | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it
A team of researchers working at the University of St Andrews in Scotland has found a way to place a laser inside a living human cell. In their paper published in the journal Nano Letters, the team describes their technique ...
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Tweaking One Enzyme Doubles A Worm's Lifespan

Tweaking One Enzyme Doubles A Worm's Lifespan | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it
It could work the same way in humans
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Stem Cell Treatments for Mitochondrial Disease May Be Possible | Sci-Tech Today - Sci-Tech Today

Stem Cell Treatments for Mitochondrial Disease May Be Possible | Sci-Tech Today - Sci-Tech Today | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it
Scientists may have taken a step toward developing new therapies for mitochondrial disease: rewinding diseased cells to create pluripotent stem cells with healthy mitochondrial DNA.
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Blood pressure drug erases memories of addiction

Blood pressure drug erases memories of addiction | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it
We’ve come a long way from when we thought addiction was just a simple chemical reaction between the brain and a substance designed to kick our dopamine levels into hyperdrive. Now we know that there are certain genetic factors involved , making...
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The Inescapable Paradox of Managing Creativity

The Inescapable Paradox of Managing Creativity | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it
It takes a powerful leader to unleash and harness innovation.
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Introducing the world's first hoseless, cordless, maskless, battery-powered CPAP device.

Introducing the world's first hoseless, cordless, maskless, battery-powered CPAP device. | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it

Airing has invented a micro CPAP device that has no
hoses, no cords, and no masks.

 

Airing inventor, Stephen Marsh, was working on an entirely different invention at the time.  And, as any creative inventor tends to do, Marsh began thinking about other applications for these micro-blowers.

Here is how Marsh recalls the birth of Airing:

"As I started to look at how others approached the micro fluidic pumps in the MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems) world, I saw a lot of limitations and inefficiencies in their designs. Because I am always facing volumetric and gravimetric challenges in the PowerChip world, I was able to come up with some real innovations in the design of a new micro fluidic pump.

Once I had designed these micro pumps, I realized that they could and should be built using the “roll-to-roll” (R2R) manufacturing process. I  validated this with Kodak who is probably the most knowledgeable manufacturing company in the R2R space since they developed much of the science and art behind it. Using Kodak’s five foot wide machine running at 83 feet per second, it can make three million micro pumps each minute!


WOW!! This makes them so low cost, they can be disposable.

My brother suffers from sleep apnea, and is what is known as
"non-compliant" (he won’t wear the traditional sleep mask). In thinking of his situation, I realized that the pumping capability of my new design could just as easily be used to pump air into a small device that could fit in your nose. If the device could blow the right amount of air at the right pressure, it could revolutionize the treatment of sleep apnea. I checked the specifications of the standard CPAP machines and concluded that these new "micro-blowers" could provide the same effect but in a portable and
disposable form.

I then discussed the concept with medical experts, who were uniformly enthusiastic about the potential of the micro blowers approach to treating breathing disorders. Based on this apparent feasibility and the desperate need for an alternative to the traditional CPAP masks, we formed Airing to develop the next generation CPAP breathing device."

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Google to collect data to create a full picture of what a healthy human being is

Google to collect data to create a full picture of what a healthy human being is | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it
Called Baseline Study, Google's project will gather anonymous genetic and molecular information to create a full picture of what a healthy human is.
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PLAYLIST: How does my brain work? 9 TED Talks

PLAYLIST: How does my brain work? 9 TED Talks | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it
Your brain is a 3-pound blob of nervous tissue -- that can create, invent and understand beauty. These talks explore the workings of your magnificent mind.
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Bayesian reasoning implicated in some mental disorders

Bayesian reasoning implicated in some mental disorders | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it
An 18th century math theory may offer new ways to understand schizophrenia, autism, anxiety and depression.
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12 Ways AI Will Disrupt Your C-Suite - InformationWeek

12 Ways AI Will Disrupt Your C-Suite - InformationWeek | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it
McKinsey & Company estimates that as much as 45% of the tasks currently performed by people can be automated using existing technologies.
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Graphene and BioElastomer Inks Could Result in 3D Printed Neurons

Graphene and BioElastomer Inks Could Result in 3D Printed Neurons | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it

"What if you could 3D print a brain or a working neurosystem? It's not outside the realm of the possible - at least in a structural sense -  as a new graphene-nanoflake ink has just been used to print strong 3D structures which resemble neurons in shape and electrical conductivity..."

 

Article via 3dprint.com > http://3dprint.com/66839/graphene-bioelastomer-inks/

 

Northwestern University paper > http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acsnano.5b01179

 


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msemporda's curator insight, May 22, 2015 5:15 AM

Interesting work in nano bioengineering which is a hot new area of science. The interdisciplinary focus of the applications using nano material is far reaching and one which has captured the attention of many in the next gen medical field.

 

Graphene in itself is considered so versatile that it's uses could be pervasive once product specific manufacturing issues are solved. Light, strong and conductive are but a few of it's features.

 

Use in biomaterial is an intriguing research area, especially when combined with cell science. Substrates and matrix formulations are diverse nowadays but with the advent of 3D bioprinting the adaption of technologies will be paramount in it's scope and usefulness.

 

There's still a very long way to go for this synthetic biotech but it may very well be the real deal when it comes to truly integrated human bionics.

 

Cheers

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Injectable device delivers nano-view of the brain - Promise against disease in electronic scaffolds

Injectable device delivers nano-view of the brain - Promise against disease in electronic scaffolds | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it
An international team of researchers has developed a method of fabricating nanoscale electronic scaffolds that can be injected via syringe. The scaffolds can then be connected to devices and used to monitor neural activity, stimulate tissues, or even promote regeneration of neurons.

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msemporda's curator insight, June 9, 2015 3:52 PM

Further on the theme previously reported in my last Scoop.it on the research being done for 3D printed graphene ink in synthetic biology substrates (http://sco.lt/8DLE5h) - this Harvard example of a practical application for a cellular substrate using bio friendly electrically conductive mesh is exciting.

 

The mere fact that the substrate can be injected makes it that much more interesting. Not sure if the graphene matrix is that flexible to be injectable or as biocompatible in situ. 

 

Perhaps there is some synergy between the 3D graphene ink and a this state-of-the-art neuro flex technology... 

 

Either way the field is moving quickly and bioengineering is as it's core.


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New material forges the way for ‘stem cell factories’ of the future

Experts at The University of Nottingham have discovered the first fully synthetic material with potential to grow billions of stem cells. The discovery could...

 

Video from - International Business Times article: http://www.ibtimes.com/are-stem-cell-factories-future-regenerative-medicine-scientists-eye-possible-2021269


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msemporda's curator insight, July 26, 2015 10:02 AM

The transitioning of the stem cell field from a unique lab based protocol system to establish proof of concept to a fully industrialized process that manufactures reliable and consistent batches in the volumes required is fast occurring.

 

The methodologies, micro-biology systems, optimization technologies, medias and mechanized operations et al are now being developed. 

 

This evolutionary step is perhaps the tell-tale sign that the cell therapy industry is maturing towards commercialization. Another would be consolidation within the sector.

 

The University of Nottingham is an international leader in the field and is amongst an increasingly important and growing group of pioneers spearheading the complex effort to bring next generation cell therapies to market.

 

Cheers

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How Tiny Lab-Grown Human Brains Are Giving Big Insights Into Autism - Singularity HUB

How Tiny Lab-Grown Human Brains Are Giving Big Insights Into Autism - Singularity HUB | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it
First came lab-grown mini-hearts, then 3D printed skin. Now scientists have taken “body on a chip” to a whole new level with tiny lab-grown human brains.
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The biotech field looking to put an end to pain - CNBC

The biotech field looking to put an end to pain - CNBC | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it
As sports grapples with the effects of injuries, one area of medicine is looking to make pain and recovery a thing of the past.
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Inspired by bats, this teen's invention is changing the way blind people experience the world.

Inspired by bats, this teen's invention is changing the way blind people experience the world. | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it
It may be a joystick, but this device is no game.
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A Chip That Mimics Human Organs Is the Design of the Year | WIRED

A Chip That Mimics Human Organs Is the Design of the Year | WIRED | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it
The chip's ultimate goal is to lessen dependence on animal test subjects and decrease time and cost for developing drugs. 
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With 3D Printing, Medical Devices Are Cool Again - TechCrunch

With 3D Printing, Medical Devices Are Cool Again - TechCrunch | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it
The recent, successful human implantation of a 3D-printed vertebra at Peking University in China captured the public’s imagination. I read the news (and its..
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Can Computing Keep up With the Neuroscience Data Deluge? - IEEE Spectrum

Can Computing Keep up With the Neuroscience Data Deluge? - IEEE Spectrum | Medical Intelligence & Innovation | Scoop.it
When an imaging run generates 1 terabyte of data, analysis becomes the problem
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