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Consequences of climate change displayed graphically.

Consequences of climate change displayed graphically. | Geo 152 | Scoop.it

Climate scientists explain why the 2015 Paris climate summit cannot be allowed to fail – for our future.


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oyndrila's curator insight, November 29, 2014 8:17 AM

Excellent graphics and useful information on climate change

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Russian Miner Captures Stunning Photos Of Foxes Living At The Edge Of The World

Russian Miner Captures Stunning Photos Of Foxes Living At The Edge Of The World | Geo 152 | Scoop.it
He may not be a professional wildlife photographer, but Ivan Kislov’s stunning pictures of foxes living in one of the world’s most remote regions are guaranteed to take your breath away.

Kislov is a mining engineer who works in Chukot...

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Imagine life without a proper toilet: that's the reality for 1 in 3 people

Imagine life without a proper toilet: that's the reality for 1 in 3 people | Geo 152 | Scoop.it
It’s 2014. So why do we still need World Toilet Day? Because 2.5 billion people still need one. World Toilet Day remains a critical means to raise awareness globally about one of the many important things…

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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:10 AM

This article made me appreciate the fact that I have a toilet. Although I know that many people in world do not have toilets, I did not know the extent of the problems caused by the lack of toilets. It's sad to know that so many children are dying everyday from preventable illnesses that people in developed countries hardly know anyone can die from. I think a lot of the problems of lack of sanitation is caused by corrupt governments and inefficient international action. Although these supranational organizations give money to these poor countries to aid them in creating better sanitation systems, the corrupt governments in these countries use the money not on their own people, leaving the people to suffer more. What makes the problem worse is the fact that many of these countries without sanitation systems face the largest population booms, which worsens the issue of sanitation even more. 

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Eerie Landforms

Eerie Landforms | Geo 152 | Scoop.it

Utah's Fantasy Canyon features mudstone eroded into bizarre shapes. This one's called "Flying Witch". #Halloween

 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah.


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One-fifth of Global Farm Soil Degraded by Salt - Our World

One-fifth of Global Farm Soil Degraded by Salt - Our World | Geo 152 | Scoop.it
Salt is degrading 20% of the world's farm soil and causing US$27.3 billion per year in economic losses, so addressing the problem is economically sensible.

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The Evolution of Women's Workwear Through the Decades

The Evolution of Women's Workwear Through the Decades | Geo 152 | Scoop.it
Clothes say a lot about women's evolving roles in the workplace. A history of 20th century office fashion in photos.

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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 24, 2014 3:48 PM

Another great picture by Seth Dixon

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Endangered Orangutans Gain From Eco-Friendly Shifts in Palm Oil Market

Endangered Orangutans Gain From Eco-Friendly Shifts in Palm Oil Market | Geo 152 | Scoop.it
Oil palm plantations are a major threat to orangutans, but new initiatives for deforestation-free palm oil may help save them.

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Smelly, contaminated, full of disease: the world’s open dumps are growing

Smelly, contaminated, full of disease: the world’s open dumps are growing | Geo 152 | Scoop.it
Almost 40% of the world’s waste ends up in huge rubbish tips, mostly found near urban populations in poor countries, posing a serious threat to human health and the environment. John Vidal reports

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 9, 2014 4:18 PM

Consequences of urbanisation in developing countries 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 21, 2014 11:27 PM

Option topic: Urban environmental change and management

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First Ebola case diagnosed on US soil

First Ebola case diagnosed on US soil | Geo 152 | Scoop.it

The first case of Ebola diagnosed on US soil is confirmed by medical officials in Dallas, Texas.


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Sydney's waters could be tropical in decades, here's the bad news...

Sydney's waters could be tropical in decades, here's the bad news... | Geo 152 | Scoop.it
Welcome to tropical Sydney, where colourful surgeonfishes and parrotfishes are plentiful, corals have replaced kelp forests, and underwater life seems brighter, more colourful and all-round better. Or…

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Slow walkers on cellphones, a Chinese city has a lane for you

Slow walkers on cellphones, a Chinese city has a lane for you | Geo 152 | Scoop.it
A section of sidewalk in Chongqing has designated lanes for the distracted smartphone user, not that they necessarily notice

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Christopher L. Story's curator insight, September 16, 2014 11:40 AM

Now...to install them in schools.

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Fewer babies made in Germany

Fewer babies made in Germany | Geo 152 | Scoop.it
Allianz Open Knowledge on Demography: Germany has long had one of Europe's lowest fertility rates with an average of only 1.36 children per woman.

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Allison Anthony's curator insight, September 6, 2014 1:58 PM

What are the implications for this powerful and economic leader in Europe?

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Why everyone should be able to read a map

Why everyone should be able to read a map | Geo 152 | Scoop.it
New research suggests that map reading is a dying skill in the age of the smartphone. Perish the thought, says Rob Cowen

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CT Blake's curator insight, September 2, 2014 4:21 PM

Especially Connor McCloud.

Dolors Cantacorps's curator insight, September 5, 2014 3:13 PM

Practiquem-ho a classe doncs!

Richard Thomas's curator insight, July 30, 2015 10:52 PM

Despite the gendered overtones of the article (that it's important for men to learn to read a map), this is some good advice, regardless of gender.  The vocabulary and concepts of maps can strengthen spatial cognition and geography awareness.  While GPS technology can help us in a pinch, relying primarily on a system that does not engage our navigation skills will weaken our ability to perform these functions.  While it intuitively makes sense, that the 'mental muscles' would atrophy when not used, it is a reminder that an overuse of geospatial technologies can be intellectually counterproductive.  So break out a trusty ol' map, but more importantly, be a part of the spatial decision-making process. 


Tags: mapping, spatial, technology, education.

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War and hunger

War and hunger | Geo 152 | Scoop.it
Scott Pelley reports on the men and women of the World Food Programme who are risking their lives to save Syrians from starvation

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McDonald's International

McDonald's International | Geo 152 | Scoop.it

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:45 PM

We talk about McDonalds as a way of Americanizing the rest of the world. These foods show that it may still be the case but local culture is still infused and desired where McDonalds expands to.

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, January 21, 2015 9:40 PM

This shows that mmcdonals is a global industy . there are many mcdonalds everywhere they put a spin oncertain diishes to match their heritage like in japan instead of hamburger meat like we americans use the use crabs.It just really shows how far mcdonalds was changed from just starting in america to being featured all over the globe

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:06 PM

I've lived and traveled to a few places especially Asia.  I've had the Ramen at McD's in Hawaii along with the Portugeuse sausage that comes with the big breakfast.  I've also experienced Japanese McD's.  It was nice to be able to find some of the regular food like a burger and fry at any McD's in the world, but I never ordered anything else. 

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Teaching about the Future of Food

Teaching about the Future of Food | Geo 152 | Scoop.it

In anticipation of this month’s (Nov 16-22) Geography Awareness Week’s focus on 'the Future of Food," I thought I would start of by sharing 10 of my personal favorite resources to use to understand our changing global food systems.


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India’s largest dam could be an ecological issue!

India’s largest dam could be an ecological issue! | Geo 152 | Scoop.it

The 3000MW Dibang dam, rejected twice as it would submerge vast tracts of biologically rich forests, is to get environmental clearance – but huge local opposition could stall the project


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Ebola striking women more frequently than men

Ebola striking women more frequently than men | Geo 152 | Scoop.it
Their social and economic roles in West Africa make them more likely to contract the virus.

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Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, October 16, 2014 11:11 PM

An interesting conectin to the issues around gender and geography

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What Kids Around the World Eat for Breakfast

What Kids Around the World Eat for Breakfast | Geo 152 | Scoop.it

What do kids around the world eat for breakfast? It’s as likely to be coffee or kimchi as it is a sugary cereal.


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Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, November 30, 2014 10:27 PM

Unit 3 Cultural Patterns and Processes

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Evidence of climate change: 35,000 walrus gather on north-west Alaska.

Evidence of climate change: 35,000 walrus gather on north-west Alaska. | Geo 152 | Scoop.it

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Scenes from the New American Dustbowl

Scenes from the New American Dustbowl | Geo 152 | Scoop.it

Political conspiracies, water witches, Exodus-quoting priests, and angry, defeated farmers in California’s dying, drought …


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David Collet's curator insight, September 23, 2014 9:01 PM

I have said this before. Malaysians need to be thankfull for all of the blessings. In Malaysia if it doesn't rain every second day we have a drought. In California it hasn't rained seriously for three years. Many in Malaysia eat the food from this region. Think about. Take action before it is too late.

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Why this Ebola outbreak became the worst we've ever seen

"The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more people than sum total of all the previous outbreaks since the virus was first identified in 1976. This video explains how it got so bad."  


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John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, October 28, 2014 10:20 PM

In just a few months the Ebola virus has cumulated out of control. More people became affected and died in the last five months than all of the combined deaths that have occurred since Ebola was first discovered in 1976. Ebola began to spread from rural areas to a border region in West Africa when ill people traveled to the city to work or go to the market, making international spread likely. Mounting a campaign to increase awareness of the risks and to contain the virus was nearly impossible due to the low illiteracy rates. Consequently, health workers were taking ill people away from family and their homes to contaminate centers. This caused much fear and mistrust and was not successful. More people became infected and the snowball effect ensued. When people did show up at ill-equipped hospitals, there were not enough beds or free space and most were turned away. Some health workers walked off the job fearing being infected because of the poor conditions. No gloves, masks or gowns were provided and workers feared for their own health. The ill patients went back into the community and Ebola continued to spread. The response of the global community was not fast enough, and help did not arrive in time before the spread of Ebola became an epidemic. It is clear that in a world that is so closely connected, we must have a global heath system that works.  

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, November 4, 2014 5:32 PM

Ebola is getting worst every day. one of the things that has caused the spread of this virus is the fact that many working people cross the border to other regions to work or to go to market. Back in days, you used to see this Ebola issue in very rural areas, but now is getting worst. In these areas were the Ebola is getting worst, they do not count with a good health system. Sometimes there are day when they do not have gloves, gowns and mask, and because of that, there have been health care workers who have just walked away from their jobs because they do not want to put in risk their life. This  is a very sad situation, which I hope it get better.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 13, 2015 10:41 PM

Geography played an important role in spreading this disease like wild fires. In a rural place such as Liberia where there is low literacy rates and  limited knowledge of Ebola, it can be spread without people knowing what is happening. On top of that there are workers crossing the border everyday for work and exposing it to everyone around them. This even took place in west Africa where Ebola breakout are unheard of. All these contributing factor led to the worst epidemic of the century. 

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13 amazing coming of age traditions from around the world

13 amazing coming of age traditions from around the world | Geo 152 | Scoop.it
Flickr: Derek A., aka i Morpheus

After reading through, join the #showyourselfie campaign today and submit your visual petition for youth onto www.showyourselfie.org.

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