Medical Device Innovation
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Scooped by Daniel L. Mooradian, Ph.D.
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How to Drive Innovation that Really Pays Off - Manager's Build

How to Drive Innovation that Really Pays Off - Manager's Build | Medical Device Innovation | Scoop.it
Technology moves fast, really fast. And as Product Leaders, it's our job to look towards the future to ensure our product won't be obsolete the moment it launches. Trying to predict the future is very hard.
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SME - Medical Device Manufacturing Sector Poised for Unprecedented Growth Driven By Innovation, According to SME

SME - Medical Device Manufacturing Sector Poised for Unprecedented Growth Driven By Innovation, According to SME | Medical Device Innovation | Scoop.it
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Scooped by Daniel L. Mooradian, Ph.D.
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Health Care Reform and the Medical Device Tax: Will it Stifle Innovation? « Michigan Life Science Council

Health Care Reform and the Medical Device Tax: Will it Stifle Innovation? « Michigan Life Science Council | Medical Device Innovation | Scoop.it
“Health Care Reform and the Medical Device Tax: Will it Stifle Innovation? #MLSC #healthcare http://t.co/xO8RS5bFGZ”
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Medical device open innovation could be expanding

Medical device open innovation could be expanding | Medical Device Innovation | Scoop.it
I’m not sure why it has not received more attention in the medical device start-up world, but the Entrepreneur Access to Capital Act (EACA), which recently passed in the U.S. House of Representatives, has the potential to open the door to intriguing fundraising possibilities for individual medical device innovators and start-ups. Although the title of the bill suggests a government grant or tax incentive program, the legislation actually proposes common sense changes to securities law to bring entrepreneurialism into the 21st century. Some pundits have referred to it as the Crowdfunding Act. According to Wikipedia, Crowdfunding is the collective cooperation, attention and trust by people who network and pool their money and other resources together, usually via the Internet, to support efforts initiated by other people or organizations. Since the 1930’s, securities law has had several restrictions that prevents Crowdfunding use for equity fundraising, including: a prohibition against “general solicitation”. Basically, the company has to have a relationship with the investors before offering to sell them securities. The investors have to be “accredited investors”, or onerous disclosure documents require completion A “broker-dealer” that takes compensation from the sale must be registered with the SEC Over the last year, I have become familiar with the Crowdfunding website Kickstarter, where users raise money for individual projects simply by posting details of their project online. These projects are generally limited to works of art, charitable activities, or adventures (acts of creativity). Kickstarter works off of the threshold pledge system (TPS), more fondly known as the Street Performer Protocol. If you have ever walked through an open-air market square and observed a crowd forming around two acrobatic teenagers playing loud music and promising to somersault over ten bystanders lying on the ground if the spectators stuff at least $20 into their hat, you have witnessed TPS. At first blush, Kickstarter may seem cute and many of the projects are amateurish, but serious projects have raised serious money. For example, Diaspora raised more than $200,000 from 6,479 people for their open-source social media website to compete with Facebook. To get around security law, Kickstarter projects do not provide equity in the project but give donors something in return. The Diaspora project offered $1,000 backers access to their nightly build servers to check out progress on the project throughout the early phases. $25 backers received a bunch of cool Diaspora stuff (stickers, t-shirts, etc.) Kickstarter and the handful of sites like it have demonstrated the power and efficiency of the Internet to democratize investment and leverage the force of a broader spectrum of smaller investors. The obvious next step is applying the methodology to purchasing equity in start-ups...
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Commercialising medical device innovation | University of Cambridge

Commercialising medical device innovation | University of Cambridge | Medical Device Innovation | Scoop.it
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