Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section
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Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section
Laboratory Medicine at the Clinical Interface
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Laboratory Medicine and Medical Biopathology

is the new name of the UEMS section.

http://www.uems-slm.org/uems/

Laboratory Medicine is the name of a medical specialty where specialists are involved in medical diagnosis using laboratory assays to characterize molecular and cellular parameters in blood, biological fluids and tissues;

It is called also clinical pathology.

This page was opened in collaboration with the working group of EFLM dedicated to Distance Learning and e-Learning

Gilbert C FAURE's insight:

It covers disciplines such as

(Biochemistry http://www.scoop.it/search?q=biochemistry)

Haematology

http://www.scoop.it/t/hematology

(Microbiology http://www.scoop.it/search?q=microbiology 130 users)

Immunology

http://www.scoop.it/t/immunology

(Genetics http://www.scoop.it/search?q=genetics)

some of them already covered by the curator of this topic

check also

http://www.scoop.it/t/autoimmunity

 

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Beyond Bands: The Immature Granulocyte Count –

Beyond Bands: The Immature Granulocyte Count – | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
In today’s clinical laboratories there are an increasing number of tests available for physicians to order. In a constant effort to provide the best tools for patient care, laboratories typically issue a Laboratory Technical Bulletin when new platforms or new testing is available.
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A patient focused relationship for specialists in laboratory medicine.

A patient focused relationship for specialists in laboratory medicine. | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
Technological change is driving individualized healthcare delivery including laboratory medicine. Ensuring patients gain from their empowerment it is essential ...
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Train with NIA Researchers in Baltimore!

Train with NIA Researchers in Baltimore! | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
Read about aging research internships and training opportunities with the National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program, located in Baltimore, Maryland.
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First Precision Medicine Laboratory in Estonia Kicks Off – Research In Estonia

First Precision Medicine Laboratory in Estonia Kicks Off – Research In Estonia | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
The lab will provide modern services, and the first of these is non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT)[1]. Andres Salumets, Professor of Reproductive Medicine at UT and the Head of CCHT said that opening this lab is a great result from the collaboration of scientists from CCHT, University of Tartu and their colleagues from abroad. Kaarel Krjutškov, the Head of the Product Development at CCHT, said that this event is a significant milestone. “We can analyse the samples here in Estonia and it also means that a lot of money stays in Estonia”, Krjutškov underlined. “What’s more, a lot of scientific data stays here for Estonian scientists for research.” More data, of course, gives more material for further development. Krjutškov noted that all the material that is left over from the test will be a part of a very valuable database. Regional Aspect Profits In addition to the benefits to Estonian science, this new lab also creates better possibilities for Estonian women living outside the largest cities. For example, pregnant women living in Saaremaa or Võru can now give blood samples at their local hospitals, whereas before they had to go to Tallinn or Pärnu. What is more, the test developed in Estonia costs almost the half, and it is important because the test is not financed by the Estonian Health Insurance Fund. The head of the specialist care package development department of the Estonian Health Insurance Fund, Tiina Sats, mentioned that they have analysed financing the test but, it has not met the criteria yet due to the high price. “It is useful and it’s certainly a good service, but we have to analyse all aspects”, she explained. Doctor-lecturer at the Tartu University Hospital and a member of Estonian Gynaecologists Society, Eva-Liina Ustav expressed hope that the test will be financed by the Health Insurance Fund at some time, at least for the risk group, as the test is really precise and much more comfortable for a woman. “Fundamentally, we already have a testing system, but this test would complement the system”, she said. More Services Are Coming The lab is developing some more high-tech tests to enter international markets. For example, one of the next projects is now being tested in fertility treatment clinics – this test checks attachment of embryo and contributes significantly to the process of in vitro fertilization. “We take tissue from the uterus, and as a result, we can tell which is the exact and best day to transfer the embryo back. It can help to increase the effectiveness of in vitro fertilization”, explained Krjutškov. What is more, in addition to the reproductive medicine issues, CCHT has two other development areas – personalised medicine and drug development. Projects in the latter field are predominantly focused on novel cancer treatment drugs and delivery systems, as well as production technologies for diagnostically and therapeutically useful recombinant peptides and proteins. Written by Marii Kangur This article was funded by the European Regional Development Fund through Estonian Research Council. [1]     http://researchinestonia.eu/2018/08/21/an-important-genetic-test-for-pregnant-women-will-soon-be-made-in-estonia/
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Laboratory Medicine - HSC Medicine & Healthcare Sciences Current Awareness Bulletins - LibGuides at Queen's University Belfast

Laboratory Medicine - HSC Medicine & Healthcare Sciences Current Awareness Bulletins - LibGuides at Queen's University Belfast | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
LibGuides: HSC Medicine & Healthcare Sciences Current Awareness Bulletins: Laboratory Medicine...
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Scientists Make A Smartphone App Test That Diagnoses Urinary Tract Infections In One Hour

Scientists Make A Smartphone App Test That Diagnoses Urinary Tract Infections In One Hour | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
A cell phone app and lab kit has been developed that enable a smartphone to ID bacteria from patients anywhere in the world in about an hour.
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Interoperability of laboratory data in Switzerland – a spotlight on Bern : LaboratoriumsMedizin

AbstractLaboratory data is a treasure chest for personalized medicine: it is – in general – electronically available, highly structured, quality controlled and indicative for many diseases. However, it is also a box with (probably more than) seven locks: laboratories use their own internal coding...
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Pan African Harmonisation Working Party

Pan African Harmonisation Working Party | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
Pan African Harmonisation Working Party on Medical Devices and Diagnostics PAHWP is a voluntary body that aims to improve access to safe and affordable medical devices and diagnostics in Africa though harmonized regulation. Our first priority is in vitro diagnostic devices. A new generation of diagnostic tests are being developed for use at the point of care that could save lives and stop the spread of infectious diseases. It is important patients in Africa have access to these tests without delay. PAHWP aims to study and recommend ways to ensure tests are safe and effective while minimizing costs and delays, allowing faster access to cheaper products. We shall undertake pilot projects in Africa using new point of care tests for CD4, viral load and early infant diagnosis of HIV as examples. We are housed under the African Union-New Partnership for Africa's Development (AU-NEPAD) Planning and Coordinating Agency. Founding members include the East African Community Health Secretariat (EAC) and the EAC partner States, Ethiopia, Nigeria and South Africa and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. Partners include German International Co-operation (EAC-GIZ), the African Society for Laboratory Medicine (ASLM) and the World Health Organisation (AFRO, WHO). Companies that develop and manufacture IVD Medical Devices are partners and PAHWP is currently expanding through the incorporation of SADC Partner States. The project is facilitated by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) with grant funding from Grand Challenges Canada (GCC). We are collaborating with the Asian Harmonization Working Party AHWP and the Latin America IVD Association ALADDIV. Our first priority is in vitro diagnostic tests The current chair of PAHWP is Tanzania Contact Agnes Sitta Kijo Through these webpages we aim to share the aims, activities and achievements of PAHWP.
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Predictive autoimmunity using autoantibodies: screening for anti-nuclear antibodies : Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM)

Abstract
Background:
Early detection of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) in asymptomatic subjects is useful to predict autoimmune diseases years before diagnosis. ANA have been determined by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) using human epithelial type 2 (HEp-2) cells, which is considered the gold...
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Harmonization in laboratory medicine: Blowin’ in the wind : Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM)

Despite monumental advances in quality improvement over the past few decades, clinical laboratories are still under increasing pressure to achieve efficiency, timeliness, safety, effectiveness and patient-centered services [1]. Laboratory tests are required for fulfilling the healthcare needs of individual patients and populations; they are critical to predict susceptibility to and prevent disease, to achieve early diagnosis and effective monitoring, and to determine prognosis and personalize treatment to get the best outcomes. They are critical to the management of communicable and noncommunicable diseases, surveillance of emerging infectious threats such as Ebola and Zika viruses, the safe and rational use of essential medicines, including stewardship of anti-infective agents to reduce the likelihood of the development of microbial resistance. Improved access to diagnostics has been shown to double the rate of adequate glycemic control, and to quadruple the number of cases of human deficiency virus infections detected [2]. However, many laboratory test results are still highly variable, poorly standardized and harmonized [3]. But analytical variability is the tip of the iceberg, as clinicians and patients require that laboratory tests performed by different laboratories at different times on the same patient can be compared and consistently evaluated. This, in turn, requires not only the comparability of analytical results but also of the ultimate laboratory information; therefore, all other aspects of the total testing process (TTP), such as terminology, sample and specimen quality, units, reference ranges and decision limits, report formats and criteria for interpretation should be harmonized [4, 5]. If the final goal is that patient treatment based on laboratory information is accurate, timely and safe, a global picture of the harmonization process is required. It has been emphasized that “although the brain-to-brain concept is widely accepted by laboratory professionals, there is little clarity concerning the inter-relationship between the different phases of the cycle, in particular the interdependence between the pre-analytical phase and analytical quality, and the role of post-analytical steps in affecting the quality of the ultimate laboratory information provided” [6]. Anything that interferes with any step in the process will be at least a waste and at most a source of errors. This concept has been defined as “the global picture of harmonization in laboratory medicine” which starts from pre-pre-analytical steps, focuses on analytical aspects and finally closes with post-post-analytical issues [4, 5]. The main reasons for focusing on a global picture of harmonization have been already reported [4, 7], but the great progress experienced in the area of harmonization in the last few years persuaded us to publish another special issue of the Journal dedicated to this topic. In particular, the aim of this special issue is not only to report progress of standardization and harmonization initiatives in the traditional area of clinical chemistry but to take into consideration progresses made in other subspecialties such as hematology, coagulation, microbiology, molecular diagnostics as well as in external quality assessment programs, reference values, terminology and units. The special issue presents a wide range of papers prepared by international experts in the different disciplines in the field of laboratory medicine and is divided into two parts: the first one includes papers describing the initiatives related to harmonization activities from a global perspective and papers dedicated to specific aspects as well (pre-pre analytical, pre-analytical and analytical phases of the TTP); the second one contains papers dedicated to post- and post-post analytical phases. Section 1. Current harmonization activities at global level. The section lists 11 papers describing: (i) the need to expand the harmonization activities to cover the different subspecialties of laboratory medicine [8]; (ii) the necessity to organize harmonized external quality schemes that include all the branches of the clinical laboratory [9]; (iii) the harmonization activities undertaken by the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine over the years in Europe and their results as well [10]; (iv) the need of a global approach (IVD companies included) to achieve test standardization/harmonization [11]; (v) the bone turnover in osteoporosis as an example of harmonization of the TTP [12]; the harmonization activities in (vi) hemostasis [13]; (vii) autoimmunity [14]; (viii) microbiology [15]; (ix) the generation and utilization of the biological variation data [16]; and finally, (x) the harmonized and unifying role of the standard ISO15189 [17]; and (xi) the external quality assessment programs and ISO15189 [18]. Section 2. Pre-pre and pre-analytical phases. This section includes two papers: (i) a consensus report from Italy related to the harmonization of the test request in emergency departments [19]; (ii) the EFLM strategy to harmonize the pre-analytical phase [20]. Section 3. Analytical phase. This section lists 17 papers. The first two are related to general activities dedicated to the harmonization and standardization of the clinical laboratory results: (i) a report from the International Consortium for harmonization [21] and (ii) a report from the Dutch Calibration 2.000 program [22]. A number of the articles (n=6) describe the harmonization activities and the respective results (positive or negative) related to a specific test or group of tests: (iii) 17 hydroxyprogesterone [23], (iv) international normalized ratio [24], (v) antithrombin [25], (vi) thiopurine drugs [26], (vii) PCR-based detection of intestinal pathogens [27], (viii) albuminuria [28]. A huge number of papers (n=9) is dedicated to the harmonization of autoimmune testing, starting from (ix) a general perspective of the feasibility of this possibility [29], and continuing with the specific activities addressing specific tests: (x) testing for rheumatic diseases [30], (xi) rheumatoid factor [31], (xii) anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies [32], (xiii) anti-nuclear antibodies [33], (xiv) autoimmune thyroid diagnostics [34], (xv) anti-nuclear antibodies patterns [35], (xvi) anti-mitochondrial and anti-rods/rings autoantibodies [36]. (xvii) A Letter to the Editor closes this section: it is related to the definition of negative patterns of anti-nuclear antibody testing [37]. Section 4. The post- and post-post analytical phase. The post-analytical part (16 papers) is mainly related to the laboratory report. The first two papers examine the issue from a general point of view: (i) a call for harmony [38] and (ii) a critical analysis on how deep we should go in harmonizing laboratory reports [39]. The following six papers are related to the harmonization of units, terminology and reference intervals: (iii) a Belgian approach to the harmonization of units [40], (iv) a recommendation by the IFCC Committee on reference intervals and decision limits [41], (v) another paper recommending how the clinical laboratory should determine reference intervals in practice [42] and finally three papers reporting on different initiatives on reference intervals, from (vi) Australasia [43], (vii) the Netherlands [44], and (viii) Canada [45]. The next papers inform (ix) about the experience on critical results alert in Australia and New Zealand [46] and (x) about the harmonization in the molecular diagnostics [47]. (xi) An interesting paper from the Italian Society of Clinical Chemistry about the harmonization of interpretative comments in hematology reports is following [48]. The last papers of this section report about the different experience in harmonization of the laboratory report based on external quality assessment activities in (xii) Italy [49] and (xiii) Norway [50], and in (xiv) proficiency testing in hemostasis [51]. The post-post-analytical phase includes two papers: (xv) one about the need of using extra-analytical quality indicators [52] and (xvi) the second one illustrating how laboratory medicine can cooperate with patients and physicians for a better collaborative healthcare [53]. We are confident that this wide range of papers covering all the phases of the TTP of the clinical laboratory and including different branches of laboratory medicine will be useful for the CCLM readership in understanding how we are and where we should go to pursue the pivotal project of harmonization in our discipline with the ultimate goal to assure better outcomes for the patients and the population we serve. References 1. Plebani M. Quality and future of clinical laboratories: the Vico’s whole cyclical theory of the recurring cycles. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:901–8.  CrossrefPubMedGoogle Scholar 2. Schroeder LF, Guarner J, Elbireer A, Castle PE, Amukele TK. Time for a model list of essential diagnostics. N Engl J Med 2016;374:2511–4.  CrossrefPubMedGoogle Scholar 3. Plebani M. Harmonization in laboratory medicine: requests, samples, measurements and reports. Crit Rev Clin Lab Sci 2016;53:184–96.  CrossrefPubMedGoogle Scholar 4. Plebani M. Harmonization in laboratory medicine: the complete picture. Clin Chem Lab Med 2013;51:741–51.  PubMedGoogle Scholar 5. Tate JR, Johnson R, Barth JH, Panteghini M. Harmonization of laboratory testing – a global activity. Clin Chim Acta 2014;432:1–3.  PubMedCrossrefGoogle Scholar 6. Plebani M. Towards a new paradigm in laboratory medicine: the five rights. Clin Chem Lab Med 2016;54:1881–91.  PubMedGoogle Scholar 7. Tate JR, Johnson R, Barth J, Panteghini M. Harmonization of laboratory testing – current achievements and future strategies. Clin Chim Acta 2014;432:4–7.  CrossrefPubMedGoogle Scholar 8. Plebani M. Harmonization in laboratory medicine: more than clinical chemistry? Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1579–86.  Google Scholar 9. Ceriotti F, Cobbaert C. Harmonization of External Quality Assessment Schemes and their role – clinical chemistry and beyond. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1587–90.  Google Scholar 10. Kilpatrick ES, Sandberg S. An overview of EFLM harmonisation activities in Europe. Clin Chem Lab Med (in print).  Google Scholar 11. Cobbaert C, Smit N, Gillery P. Metrological traceability and harmonization of medical tests: a quantum leap forward is needed to keep pace with globalization and stringent IVD-regulations in the 21st century! Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1598–602.  Google Scholar 12. Vasikaran S. Assessment of bone turnover in osteoporosis: harmonization of the total testing process. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1603–7.  Google Scholar 13. Favaloro EJ, Gosselin R, Olson J, Jennings I, Lippi G. Recent initiatives in harmonization of hemostasis practice. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1608–19.  Google Scholar 14. Damoiseaux J, Olschowka N, Shoenfeld Y. EASI – European Autoimmunity Standardisation Initiative: facing the challenges of diagnostics in autoimmunity. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1620–3.  Google Scholar 15. Samuel LP. Harmonization of microbiology processes and standards: work in progress. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1624–8.  Google Scholar 16. Aarsand AK, Røraas T, Bartlett WA, Coşkun A, Carobene A, Fernandez-Calle P, et al., on behalf of the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) Working Group on Biological Variation. Harmonization initiatives in the generation, reporting and application of biological variation data. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1629–36.  Google Scholar 17. Thelen MH, Huisman W. Harmonization of accreditation to ISO15189. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1637–43.  Google Scholar 18. Sciacovelli L, Secchiero S, Padoan A, Plebani M. External quality assessment programs in the context of ISO 15189 accreditation. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1644–54.  Google Scholar 19. Lippi G, Panteghini M, Bernardini S, Bonfanti L, Carraro P, Casagranda I, et al. Laboratory testing in the emergency department: an Italian Society of Clinical Biochemistry and Clinical Molecular Biology (SIBioC) and Academy of Emergency Medicine and Care (AcEMC) consensus report. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1655–9.  Google Scholar 20. Lippi G, Simundic A-M., on behalf of the European Federation for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) Working Group for Preanalytical Phase (WG-PRE). The EFLM strategy for harmonization of the preanalytical phase. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1660–6.  Google Scholar 21. Myers GL, Miller WG. The roadmap for harmonization: status of the International Consortium for Harmonization of Clinical Laboratory Results. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1667–72.  Google Scholar 22. Jansen RT, Cobbaert CM, Weykamp C, Thelen M. The quest for equivalence of test results: the pilgrimage of the Dutch Calibration 2.000 program for metrological traceability. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1673–84.  Google Scholar 23. Greaves RF, Ho CS, Loh TP, Chai JH, Jolly L, Graham P, et al., on behalf of Working Group 3 “Harmonisation of Laboratory Assessment” European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action BM1303 “DSDnet”. Current state and recommendations for harmonization of serum/plasma 17-hydroxyprogesterone mass spectrometry methods. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1685–97.  Google Scholar 24. Meijer P, Kynde K, van den Besselaar AM, Van Blerk M, Woods TA. International normalized ratio (INR) testing in Europe: between-laboratory comparability of test results obtained by Quick and Owren reagents. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1698–703.  Google Scholar 25. Ruhaak LR, Romijn FP, Smit NP, van der Laarse A, Pieterse MM, de Maat MP, et al. Detecting molecular forms of antithrombin by LC-MRM-MS: defining the measurands. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1704–14.  Google Scholar 26. Robijns K, Luin M, Jansen R, Neef C, Touw D. Introduction of a new design for external quality assessment for the analysis of thiopurine drugs. Clin Chem Lab Med (in print).  Google Scholar 27. Schuurs TA, Koelewijn R, Brienen EA, Kortbeek T, Mank TG, Mulder B, et al. Harmonization of PCR-based detection of intestinal pathogens: experiences from the Dutch external quality assessment scheme on molecular diagnosis of protozoa in stool samples. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1722–7.  Google Scholar 28. Ćwiklińska A, Dąbrowska H, Kowalski R, Kuchta A, Kortas-Stempak B, Fijałkowska A, et al. Harmonization of urine albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) results: a study based on an external quality assessment program in Polish laboratories. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1728–33.  Google Scholar 29. Monogioudi E, Martos G, Hutu DP, Schimmel H, Meroni PL, Sheldon J, et al. Standardization of autoimmune testing – is it feasible? Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1734–42.  Google Scholar 30. Meroni PL, Borghi MO. Diagnostic laboratory tests for systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases: unmet needs towards harmonization. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1743–8.  Google Scholar 31. Falkenburg WJ, von Richthofen HJ, Koers J, Weykamp C, Schreurs MW, Bakker-Jonges LE, et al. Clinically relevant discrepancies between different rheumatoid factor assays. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1749–58.  Google Scholar 32. Damoiseaux J, Heijnen I, Van Campenhout C, Eriksson C, Fabien N, Herold M, et al. An international survey on anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) testing in daily clinical practice. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1759–70.  Google Scholar 33. Pérez D, Gilburd B, Cabrera-Marante Ó, Martínez-Flores JA, Serrano M, Naranjo L, et al. Predictive autoimmunity using autoantibodies: screening for anti-nuclear antibodies. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1771–7.  Google Scholar 34. Tozzoli R, Bizzaro N. Harmonization in autoimmune thyroid disease diagnostics. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1778–82.  Google Scholar 35. Andrade LE, Klotz W, Herold M, Conrad K, Rönnelid J, Fritzler MJ, et al. International consensus on antinuclear antibody patterns: definition of the AC-29 pattern associated with antibodies to DNA topoisomerase I. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1783–8.  Google Scholar 36. Calise SJ, Zheng B, Hasegawa T, Satoh M, Isailovic N, Ceribelli A, et al., the IUIS Autoantibody Standardization Committee. Reference standards for the detection of anti-mitochondrial and antirods/rings autoantibodies. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1789–98.  Google Scholar 37. Herold M, Klotz W, Andrade LE, Conrad K, Cruvinel WM, Damoiseaux J, et al. International Consensus on Antinuclear Antibody Patterns: defining negative results and reporting unidentified patterns. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1799–802.  Google Scholar 38. Jones GR, Legg M. Report formatting in laboratory medicine – a call for harmony. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018. doi: 10.1515/cclm-2017-1165. [Epub ahead of print].  Google Scholar 39. Flatman R. Terminology, units and reporting – how harmonized do we need to be? Clin Chem Lab Med 2018. doi: 10.1515/cclm-2017-1083. [Epub ahead of print].  PubMedGoogle Scholar 40. Demarteau M, Cammaert P, Vandevelde NM, Callewaert N, Coucke W, China B, et al. A pragmatic bottom-up approach to harmonize the units of clinical chemistry tests among Belgian clinical laboratories, focused on immunoassays. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018. doi: 10.1515/cclm-2017-0824. [Epub ahead of print].  Google Scholar 41. Jones GR, Haeckel R, Loh TP, Sikaris K, Streichert T, Katayev A, et al. IFCC Committee on Reference Intervals and Decision Limits. Indirect methods for reference interval determination – review and recommendations. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018. doi: 10.1515/cclm-2018-0073. [Epub ahead of print].  PubMedGoogle Scholar 42. Ozarda Y, Higgins V, Adeli K. Verification of reference intervals in routine clinical laboratories: practical challenges and recommendations. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018. doi: 10.1515/cclm-2018-0059. [Epub ahead of print].  PubMedGoogle Scholar 43. Koerbin G, Sikaris K, Jones GR, Flatman R, Tate JR; AACB Harmonization Committee for Common Reference Intervals. An update report on the harmonization of adult reference intervals in Australasia. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018. doi: 10.1515/cclm-2017-0920. [Epub ahead of print].  PubMedGoogle Scholar 44. den Elzen WP, Brouwer N, Thelen MH, Le Cessie S, Haagen I-A, Cobbaert CM. Standardized reference intervals in the Netherlands using a ‘big data’ approach. Clin Chem Lab Med (in print).  Google Scholar 45. Parker ML, Adeli K, CSCC Working Group on Reference Interval Harmonization. Pediatric and adult reference interval harmonization in Canada: an update. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018. doi: 10.1515/cclm-2017-0965. [Epub ahead of print].  Google Scholar 46. Campbell CA, Lam Q, Horvath AR. An evidence- and risk-based approach to a harmonized laboratory alert list in Australia and New Zealand. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018. doi: 10.1515/cclm-2017-1114. [Epub ahead of print].  PubMedGoogle Scholar 47. Payne DA, Baluchova K, Russomando G, Ahmad-Nejad P, Mamotte C, Rousseau F, et al. IFCC Committee on Molecular Diagnostics. Toward harmonization of clinical molecular diagnostic reports: findings of an international survey. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018. doi: 10.1515/cclm-2017-1080. [Epub ahead of print].  PubMedGoogle Scholar 48. Buoro S, Da Rin G, Fanelli A, Lippi G. Harmonization of interpretative comments in laboratory hematology report: the recommendations of Working Group on Diagnostic Hematology of the Italian Society of Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Molecular Biology (WGDH-SIBioC). Clin Chem Lab Med 2018. doi: 10.1515/cclm-2017-0972. [Epub ahead of print].  Google Scholar 49. Secchiero S, Sciacovelli L, Plebani M. Harmonization of units and reference intervals of plasma proteins: state of the art from an External Quality Assessment Scheme. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018. doi: 10.1515/cclm-2017-1172. [Epub ahead of print].  PubMedGoogle Scholar 50. Stavelin A, Sandberg S. Harmonization activities of Noklus – a quality improvement organization for point-of-care laboratory examinations. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018. doi: 10.1515/cclm-2018-0061. [Epub ahead of print].  PubMedGoogle Scholar 51. Favaloro EJ, Jennings I, Olson J, Van Cott EM, Bonar R, Gosselin R, et al. Towards harmonization of external quality assessment/proficiency testing in hemostasis. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018. doi: 10.1515/cclm-2018-0077. [Epub ahead of print].  PubMedGoogle Scholar 52. Aita A, Sciacovelli L, Plebani M. Extra-analytical quality indicators – where to now? Clin Chem Lab Med 2017. doi: 10.1515/cclm-2017-0964. [Epub ahead of print].  PubMedGoogle Scholar 53. Watson ID, Wilkie P, Hannan A, Beastall GH. Role of laboratory medicine in collaborative healthcare. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018. doi: 10.1515/cclm-2017-0853. [Epub ahead of print].  PubMedGoogle Scholar About the article Published Online: 2018-07-09 Published in Print: 2018-09-25 Author contributions: All the authors have accepted responsibility for the entire content of this submitted manuscript and approved submission. Research funding: None declared. Employment or leadership: None declared. Honorarium: None declared. Citation Information: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM), Volume 56, Issue 10, Pages 1559–1562, ISSN (Online) 1437-4331, ISSN (Print) 1434-6621, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2018-0594. Export Citation ©2018 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston.
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ePath Logic - enhancing laboratory medicine

ePath Logic - enhancing laboratory medicine | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
We support clinical pathology consults and DMTs, providing expert advice on lab interpretations and test selection, improving diagnostic error at a reduced cost...
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Webinar: Diagnostics are Essential for Healthcare: Challenges in LMICs and How to Overcome Them | Consortium of Universities for Global Health

Webinar: Diagnostics are Essential for Healthcare: Challenges in LMICs and How to Overcome Them | Consortium of Universities for Global Health | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
Low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) face a range of obstacles in healthcare including access, funding, education, and personnel. However, laboratory diagnostics including pathology are particularly challenging because of the specialized personnel, unique reagents, quality processes, and overall logistics of delivering the right diagnosis to the right patient at the right time. In this webinar, on September 12 at 1-2 PM ET, leaders from academia, the ASCP, and the CDC will discuss the challenges of laboratory diagnostics and present examples of solutions from cancer and infectious diseases. Common pitfalls and practical, sustainable solutions will be discussed. Click here to register. SPEAKERS: Quentin Eichbaum, MD, PhD, MPH, MFA, MMHC, FCAP | Vanderbilt University School of Medicine: Quentin Eichbaum was born and raised in Namibia and South Africa. He initially studied law at the University of Cape Town and then completed his MD, MPH, PhD/postdoctoral studies at Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston followed by residency and fellowship training at Massachusetts General Hospital. He is currently Professor of Pathology, Microbiology and immunology and Professor of Medical Education and Administration at Vanderbilt University where he also directs the a fellowship in pathology, as well as the Pathology Program in Global Health and the Vanderbilt Pathology Education Research Group. He serves on numerous national and international global health education and pathology committees. At CUGH he chairs the Education Committee and is on the Board of Directors of Directors. He co-founded the Consortium of New Sub-Sahara African Medical Schools (CONSAMS) and is involved in health professional education and clinical medicine in several African countries. Kevin Karem, PhD | Centers for Disease Control (CDC): Dr. Karem is the Associate Director for Laboratory Science in the CDCs Center for Global Health. He's held positions as scientific leader, team leader, branch chief and associate director; and in the private sector as scientist and consultant. His experiences include leadership and support to global including the WHO and PAHO. In 2015, he provided leadership in laboratory response to the W. Africa Ebola outbreak, and has worked in the America's for laboratory capacity building during the Zika virus outbreak. Dr. Karem is dedicated to advancing science through implementation and innovation for, and fostering relationships for improved performance. Dan Milner, MD, MSc | American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) : Dr. Dan Milner is the Chief Medical Officer of the American Society for Clinical Pathology where he handles all medical affairs and oversees the work of the Center for Global Health including all PEPFAR activities, the Partners for Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment Initiative, and collaborative work with more than 15 international partners. Dr. Milner was previously at Harvard as an infectious disease pathologist and microbiologist and is the author of over 125 manuscripts and publications.
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Introducing e-Valuate™ - Lab cost management, easy as ABC —

Introducing e-Valuate™ - Lab cost management, easy as ABC — | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
LTS Health introduces e-Valuate™ to efficiently and accurately calculate a lab’s test costs. This holds many benefits to labs that are increasingly facing a wave of cost saving requirements.
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The Power List 2018

The Power List 2018 | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
Join us in celebrating the 100 most influential professionals in the field, nominated by you and selected by a panel of pathologist judges...
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Introducing the Grand Rounds: a new multidisciplinary clinical pathology forum

Introducing the  Grand Rounds: a new multidisciplinary clinical pathology forum | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
In this month’s issue, we introduce a prototype article for a new section, the JCP Grand Rounds ( see pages 860 ). The articles are meant to centre around a case report and provide an in-depth discussion of interesting cases with a multidisciplinary pathology component.
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A Powerful Tool

A Powerful Tool | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
How we hope The Pathologist’s Power List will spark conversations and inspire greatness...
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Analysis of community blood test requests highlights potential demand for multiplex platforms — NIHR Community Healthcare MIC

A team from the NIHR Community Healthcare MIC analysed data from over 11.7 million laboratory blood tests.
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Medical detectives -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Medical detectives -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
Collecting, interpreting and reading traces – this is also the task of physicians when taking samples, analyzing and evaluating them. Laboratory medicine is the foundation of diagnostics. You can discover which innovative laboratory technology will soon be on the market and what is standard in...
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John Libbey Eurotext - Annales de Biologie Clinique - Rapport des Académies nationales de médecine et de pharmacie sur la biologie médicale La biologie médicale face aux défis de l’évolution des be...

John Libbey Eurotext - Annales de Biologie Clinique - Rapport des Académies nationales de médecine et de pharmacie sur la biologie médicale La biologie médicale face aux défis de l’évolution des be... | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
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A Guide to Utilization of the Microbiology Laboratory for Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases: 2018 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Society for Microbiology.

A Guide to Utilization of the Microbiology Laboratory for Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases: 2018 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Society for Microbiology. | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
The critical nature of the microbiology laboratory in infectious disease diagnosis calls for a close, positive working relationship between the physician/advanc...
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Annals of Saudi Medicine - Demand management and optimization of clinical laboratory services in a tertiary referral center in Saudi Arabia

Annals of Saudi Medicine - Demand management and optimization of clinical laboratory services in a tertiary referral center in Saudi Arabia | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
Demand management and optimization of clinical laboratory services in a tertiary referral center in Saudi Arabia...
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Special Issue: Harmonization in Laboratory Medicine: the Request, the Sample, the Measurement, and the Report – an Update. Part 1 / Editors: Jillian R. Tate, MariaStella Graziani and Mario Plebani ...

Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM) Published in Association with the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) Editor-in-Chief: Plebani, Mario Ed. by Gillery, Philippe / Lackner, Karl J. / Lippi, Giuseppe / Melichar, Bohuslav / Payne, Deborah A. / Schlattmann, Peter / Tate, Jillian R. 12 Issues per year IMPACT FACTOR 2017: 3.556 CiteScore 2017: 2.34 SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2017: 1.114 Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2017: 1.188 249,00 € / $374.00 / £205.00* ADD TO CART OnlineISSN 1437-4331 Overview Current Issue Ahead of print Most Downloaded Articles Issue Journal/Yearbook GO Select Volume and Issue Volume 56, Issue 10 (Oct 2018) Special Issue: Harmonization in Laboratory Medicine: the Request, the Sample, the Measurement, and the Report – an Update. Part 1 / Editors: Jillian R. Tate, MariaStella Graziani and Mario Plebani DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS Editorials DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS Section 1: Current Harmonization Activities at Global Level DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS Section 2: Pre-Pre and Pre-Analytical Phase DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS Section 3: The Analytical Phase DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE OPEN ACCESS DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE OPEN ACCESS DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS DOWNLOAD PDF SAVE FREE ACCESS Comments (0)
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ARUP Scientific Resource for Research and Education: Educational Resources - Introduction to the ABO Blood Group | University of Utah

ARUP Scientific Resource for Research and Education: Educational Resources - Introduction to the ABO Blood Group | University of Utah | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
Introduction to the ABO Blood Group The ABO blood group system is the most important in transfusion medicine. This presentation covers basic ABO inheritance, antigen production and expression, and weak subgroups. Originally published on September 4, 2018 Lecture Presenter Justin R. Rhees, MS, MLS(ASCP)CM, SBBCM Assistant Professor, Medical Laboratory Sciences Weber State University Justin received his M.S. Degree in Laboratory Medicine and Biomedical Science at the University of Utah. He is a Specialist in Blood Bank Technology, board certified by the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), and is an active member of AABB, the South Central Association of Blood Banks (SCABB), and the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science (ASCLS). Objectives After this presentation, participants will be able to: Describe the biochemistry and production of the A, B, and H antigens. Compare and contrast the subgroups of the A and B blood types. Describe two lectins that can be used to aid in correct ABO typing. Given the results of forward and reverse ABO typing, correctly interpret the patient’s ABO group and identify patterns of discrepancy. Sponsored by: University of Utah School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, and ARUP Laboratories
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The Conversation: Why we need academic health science centres

The Conversation: Why we need academic health science centres | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
Partnerships between a university with a medical school and its teaching hospital, AHSCs provide the seed crop of doctors who will ultimately lead the provision of care to Canadians. ...
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House Passes Transparency Reforms to Medicare's Local Coverage Program

House Passes Transparency Reforms to Medicare's Local Coverage Program | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
As LCD reform bill moves to Senate, the CAP expresses concern with the House's removal of key provisions to weaken the bill...
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