Psychology of Media & Technology
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Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
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How A Toronto-Based Storytelling App Is Becoming A Hollywood Idea Factory

How A Toronto-Based Storytelling App Is Becoming A Hollywood Idea Factory | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

For those of you who believed the written word was dead, not so fast!  The unending appetite for good stories and Wattpad as a vehicle for storytellers (think YouTube for readers) provides an obvious entry point for marketers who can craft compelling brand narratives.  The value of storytelling in text is that is that it lets the reader supply the visual storyworld through their imagination, instantly turning them into stakeholders.

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, June 14, 2016 8:18 PM

 

Nicole LaPorte:  "Having established itself as a critical part of movie-marketing campaigns, Wattpad is now looking to produce its own entertainment."

Psychology of Media & Technology
The science behind media behaviors
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Stories From Experts About the Impact of Digital Life | Pew Research Center

Stories From Experts About the Impact of Digital Life | Pew Research Center | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
While technology experts and scholars have concerns about the current and future impact of the internet, they also tend to report their own experience of digital life as positive.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

I'm generally a 'glass-half-full' person when it comes to technology.  I recognize that, like any tool, the impact is related to how you use it (good or bad).  There is so much potential in digital connectivity that we overlook, from economic development and social access to exposing the bad guys (how long would it have taken to find out that the government was keeping immigrant children in tents in the desert without social media or to generate enough attention to give enough voice to #BlackLivesMatter or #MeToo to change the conversation of a nation?).  Besides, there are so many technophobes frantically trying to prove how awful technology is (phones, games, social media, if it electronic, it's bad), that I figure the topic is more than well-covered.  

 

The recent report from Pew was fun in that it includes anecdotes from people's experience, rather than just "expert opinions."  Now all my students will know that personal experience is not generalizable (!!!), however, this particular report warmed my heart because it included my anecdote about my Dad, who passed away at age 91, used ALL CAPS in every email message he sent (he did not get the  yelling concept), loved to share jokes and used Facebook regularly to stay "in the know" of what the family was up to.  I would have loved to see him take on Snap and Instagram.  He would have been out taking pictures of flowers and leaves and posting his unique if not occasionally snarky commentary on the world.  He wondered about a lot of things and saw beauty everywhere.  I hope that I wonder about a lot of things and see beauty until I'm 91 (and longer!) too.

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Cambridge Analytica Shuts Down After Facebook Data Scandal

Cambridge Analytica Shuts Down After Facebook Data Scandal | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
The Facebook data breach scandal was too much for Cambridge Analytica to weather, and the company announced it is shutting down. After reports that Cambridge Anayltica had misused consumer data, the company says it was not able to attract new clients, and it lost existing business due to negative media coverage.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Whack-a-mole anyone? Cambridge Analytica may be closing, but execs still have all the data from 87 million Facebook users they used to generate personality profiles.  Not only did they abuse data policies, but there are other indicators of the corporate culture: "the company’s reputation was further damaged after reports that CEO — who has since resigned — Alexander Nix had discussed using bribes and sex as strategies to entrap political opponents."  Behavior that's OK at the top, is by default acceptable throughout the organization.  Potential clients, I have some words for you: 1) Due Diligence and 2) Halo-effect.   

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Study: Negative Social Media Experiences Linked to Depression | National News | US News

Study: Negative Social Media Experiences Linked to Depression | National News | US News | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
"We have to be careful not to villainize technology over what's a human function," Rutledge says. "It's very important to remember these are just tools."
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Two important points: 1) Negative experiences are not the sole province of social media--they happen offline as well as on, and 2) "linked" is not the same as causal.  It is, however, probably fair to say that bad experiences can contribute to depression no matter where they occur. As a positive psychologist, I think Primack makes the best point - we need to teach people to develop resilience to negative experiences.  These are valuable skills for all aspects of life.

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Debunking the 6 biggest myths about 'technology addiction'

Popular concerns about technology use and alleged addiction don't hold up to scholarly scrutiny.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Must-read article by Chris Ferguson.   One of my pet peeves is the irresponsible use of "addiction" and other claims that amp up technophobia and distract from the more fundamental issues in how people use and consume media--and any underlying mental health issues.  Chris does a great job of addressing and explaining some of these "myths."

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Intervention ideas from experts to ease tech-related problems | Pew Research Center

Intervention ideas from experts to ease tech-related problems | Pew Research Center | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
With every new technology, we have to learn the new rules of engagement. This only comes from understanding what the technology can and can’t do and how that impacts our goals, behaviors and choices.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Aside from my pet peeve regarding the flagrant misuse of the word "addiction," the assumptions about the negative impact are not only overstated but completely ignore the  upside.  Tech is a tool.  Not using tech as a societal solution to "tech addiction" is ludicrous.  Like "Just Say No," it sounds good but not only ignores the myriad of tech applications in our lives, it is blind to the fundamental drivers of human motivation that technology facilitates - social connection, self-efficacy and agency.  The answer isn't abstinence, it's training.  At the end of the day, it isn't about the tech, it's about psychology and perceived benefits to the person using it.  

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Maybe you shouldn’t read this column on your phone

Maybe you shouldn’t read this column on your phone | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
"It's really about choice," she said. "Taking your eyes off the road for a second (even to fish something non-technology related off the floor) is all it takes to miss traffic cues."
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

We are social animals and phones are portals to our social world.  The "need to know tendency" is innate in us all, but more pronounced in teens, who also are in a formative cognitive stage, having not fully developed the ability to assess longer-term risk.  This isn't a personal failing, it's a biological feature of physical development. This make smartphones deeply compelling in the most fundamental sense.  The only way to counteract this tendency is through mindful choice.  In other words, making a conscious decision and sticking with it.

 

Couple the tendency to go social with our mistaken belief in  the concept of "multi-tasking."  Sadly, in spite of our best efforts, we are incapable of focusing on more than one thing at a time. Some people are very, very good at task-switching, but what we don't pay attention to we might not see, not even with our peripheral vision.  Cognitive scientists have repeatedly shown that we suffer from "inattention blindness"--missing all kinds of important things around us--when we concentrate on one thing.  Another way of thinking about this is in terms of presence.  Where are you psychologically present when you're on the  phone or texting?  Your body may still be behind the while, but your mind is with your friends, family or boss, not on the highway.

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Snapchat is stuck in the uncanny valley of AR glasses

Snapchat is stuck in the uncanny valley of AR glasses | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
@joshconstine)
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

I love this analogy!  Another way to think about the problems of Uncanny Valley is that is it distancing.  Humans are social creatures.  Social connections are a primary motivator for most actions.  Snap filters, however rudimentary and grotesque are a connecting device because they make people pause and are often humorous.  The generation of emotion in the context of someone sending you something is a positive social experience.  Yet,  as @joshconstine notes, the current designs for Snap glasses are distancing just like the creepy humanoids of the Uncanny Valley.  Social distancing triggers our "danger danger" warning light since science shows that social connection is key to our physical and emotional health and development--not to mention a meaningful life.  

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Here's why we feel compelled to record music concerts (sorry, Jack White)

Here's why we feel compelled to record music concerts (sorry, Jack White) | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
Jack White, Alicia Keys and a growing number of artists don't want your cell phone at their shows. Why do you?
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Jack White says banning phones will ensure a 100% human experience at his concerts.News flash--getting a momento of an experience IS 100% human experience.  But I get his concern--being on the receiving end of a bunch of waving cell phones probably makes you feel like you don't have the audience's complete attention (just like when your spouse can't put down his phone at dinner.)  But consider how different you would feel if your spouse said "this moment is so important to me that I want to capture it so I can relive it again and share it with my friends."  The ability to capture an event in image or video increases our commitment to the moment as well as our anticipation of future enjoyment.  It also encourages appreciation and allows us to savor the moment in perpetuity--hence the term in positive psychology of "savoring" as the act of appreciating.  This action is a commitment that capitalizes not only fanship, as Barasch says, but our positive emotions.  Preoccupation with what others will think of our capture, of course, diverts our finite cognitive resources.  The same would be true, however, if you spent the concert wondering who in the crowd was noticing you or admiring your outfit--something I guarantee that many teens also do given the hyper-aware social tentacles of youth.  I suggest that rather than banning phones, artists acknowledge this as a compliment but also TALK to the audience about how it feels.  But artists beware: the greater the artist's fame, the larger the venue and the more financial commitment to attending the event, the less likely the audience will want to comply.  The moment matters to much to the fan to forego the opportunity to capture their bit of bliss.

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Dr. Pamela Rutledge

Dr. Pamela Rutledge | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
This week on BetterWorldians Radio we’re joined by Dr. Pamela Rutledge, a media psychologist. She’ll explain the impact this can have on our brains and share a surprising antidote: humor. Dr. Rutledge will also discuss the positive power of gaming and her interesting take on “selfies” and how they can be a useful way to explore self-image.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

It's always a pleasure to talk about the psychological potential in technology when so many people are focused on the negative.  Sadly, the negative plays into the fear reaction to something new.  I love that the BetterWorldians are working hard to support the upside.  #positivepsychology #mediapsychology.  This point of view is the foundation for what we teach at Fielding Graduate University in researching and developing positive media uses and applications.

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Four Ways to Keep Your Brand and Marketing Relevant Amid Fluctuating Cultural Trends

Four Ways to Keep Your Brand and Marketing Relevant Amid Fluctuating Cultural Trends | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
For a marketing strategy or campaign to succeed, marketers must find ways to mesh their brand's core values with the cultural context of customers - their values, ideologies, and trends. See how.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

While media psychology isn't mentioned in this article, it is at the core of each of these pieces of advice to keep marketing relevant.  Knowing your audience and adapting to the cultural context isn't just about "psychographics", it's about the psychological implications of cognition, developmental stages, needs, goals, affiliation, beliefs and meaning.  The ability to communicate well (i.e. "use visuals") means understanding things like how people derive meaning from multi-sensory input, how neuroscience and instinct drive our attention and desire, and how information is processed.  This is #mediapsychology (and for a shameless plug--all are things we teach in our Audience Engagement and Brand Psychology classes).  

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Ferdinand the Bull Can Teach Your Kids About Their Strengths

Ferdinand the Bull Can Teach Your Kids About Their Strengths | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
The classic story of Ferdinand the Bull is now an animated film. Ferdinand is family-friendly but it can be so much more. You can use it to help your kids find their strengths.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

My parenting tip this holiday season: use Ferdinand the Bull as a hidden holiday gift to plant some new seeds in your kids (or your own) brain. The movie's overt messages “you can’t judge a book by its cover” and “be true to yourself” imply that you have a right to be who you are.  A subtler, and equally important, message is that Ferdinand’s success at doing so comes from discovering and using his strengths. Ferdinand isn’t a fighter but he has tremendous strengths of courage, creativity, resilience, loyalty and altruism that will enable him to succeed as a lover. Talk about what’s unseen or uncelebrated that allowed Ferdinand to achieve his end goal--and might get your kid to his or hers. #positivepsychology #mediaforgood #medialiteracy 

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NRA Says Pretend Guns, Not Real Guns, Cause Crime And The APA Unwittingly Helps Them

NRA Says Pretend Guns, Not Real Guns, Cause Crime And The APA Unwittingly Helps Them | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
Co-authored by Patrick Markey at Villanova University
The recent mass homicide in Las Vegas has set the country, once again, on a soul searc
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Bravo Chris Ferguson and Patrick Markey for taking a clear stand to combat folk theories of media violence, particularly in the face of an obviously self-serving attack by the NRA.  Frankly, it makes me question the wisdom and integrity of the NRA and increases my opposition to any of their positions, not the reverse.  A subplot here is the Trumpian tactic to pick a highly emotional target to blame.  Since the NFL was taken, I guess video games will have to do.

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Selena Gomez just showed us how to share life-changing news on social media with grace

Selena Gomez just showed us how to share life-changing news on social media with grace | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
Keep these things in mind before breaking big news on Facebook or Instagram.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Bravo Selena Gomez for showing how to share gratitude.  

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This class helps developing-world solutions reach people in need

This class helps developing-world solutions reach people in need | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
The innovations emerging from Stanford University’s Design for Extreme Affordability course are both viable business models and sensitive to local needs.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

It's ironic that knowing your audience is a big deal. It tells you something about the rampant solipsism in the world.  (love that word.)  In other words, we are not our customer.  #cognitivebias #audienceengagement #fieldingmediapsych

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Trump has turned words into weapons. And he's winning the linguistic war | George P Lakoff and Gil Duran | Opinion | The Guardian

Trump has turned words into weapons. And he's winning the linguistic war | George P Lakoff and Gil Duran | Opinion | The Guardian | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
journalists must understand how propaganda works on the brain and grasp the cognitive science that marketers of propaganda have implicitly mastered: frames, metaphors, narratives and brain basics
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

MUST READ editorial on how Trump is controlling the cognitive framework of reality.  It's time to take charge of our language rather than repeating his.

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Kelly Marie Tran and Daisy Ridley of Star Wars leave Instagram

Kelly Marie Tran and Daisy Ridley of Star Wars leave Instagram | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
Kelly Marie Tran, isn't the first 'Star Wars' player to disengage with social media following personal attacks. Fellow actress Daisy Ridley stepped away from the online world as well.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

The importance of personal boundaries: We may be good at walking away from a rude person or leaving a party that isn't fun, but we're terrible at transferring these boundary-setting skills to the online world.  We make the mistake of blaming social media for what is often our ability (or giving ourselves permission) to set personal boundaries.  It shouldn't have to be framed as mental health to have it be ok to leave some jerks behind.  If the energy and impact of any activity isn't worth the benefits, then we should have the ability to walk away without it suggesting that our mental health might be damaged.  How about our mental wellness enhanced?  How about if something just doesn't make us feel good?   The pursuit of wellness and self care isn't about deficit, it's about choosing a positive path.

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The 9 Biggest Instagram Mistakes Couples Make

The 9 Biggest Instagram Mistakes Couples Make | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
Whether it's comforting or not, the truth is that social media alone can't ruin your relationship or make all your friends roll their eyes at your incessant humblebragging. Only you can do that.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Social media is an extension of our social world.  Behaviors that are annoying or hurtful offline, are just, if not more, annoying online.  People often forget that they are talking to a broader "public" or audience, not just a few friends.  The result is that something that might be cute or innocuous can end up having an entirely different meaning and impact.  The result?  More distance between you and your friends, not closer.  The best test is to step out of your own shoes and look at your posting behavior through objective eyes of an outsider.  

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'Love, Simon' & The Sociopolitical Importance of Your Dollar: Op-Ed

'Love, Simon' & The Sociopolitical Importance of Your Dollar: Op-Ed | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it

Love, Simon is a film with significant racial diversity throughout the cast, actors of all different sexualities performing in all different roles, honest discussions of what the coming-out process is like, and a portrayal of queerness as something that can be completely ordinary. This is the exactly the kind of representation that we want to see more of.

Consider a ticket to Love, Simon as an investment in the future of entertainment. If this movie can perform very well at the box office, studio executives will have less of an excuse to not make diverse stories for the silver screen. Plus, you get the benefit of seeing a movie that is well-worth the cost of admission.

Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

We rarely consider the weight of our choices in media, but every choice, whether to go to a theater or on TV is casting a vote for programming.  As a society, we happily "blame" the media for the lack of programming we want to see (or the depths to which we think it has sunk, but seldom take responsibility for our contribution to what we see and the media choices we have.  This billboard Op-Ed by Stephen Daw sums it up nicely:  Love, Simon is the exactly the kind of representation that we want to see more of, so consider a ticket to Love, Simon as an investment in the future of entertainment so that studio executives will have less of an excuse to not make diverse stories for the silver screen. 

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Hollywood Uses Mobile Phone Data to Better Understand Its Audiences –

Hollywood Uses Mobile Phone Data to Better Understand Its Audiences – | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
That kind of granular insight into the composition of the audience for the Hugh Jackman musical wouldn’t have been possible at Fox even a year ago. But it’s becoming more common across the entertainment business as more content consumption moves to mobile platforms, which is enabling marketing executives to get a deeper understanding of the user base than other media afford.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

The race is on for consumer data.  But buckets of data aren't enough.  You have to be able to ask the right questions, have data scientists that know how to extract relevant and valid data and not lose sight of the fact that you're talking about human behavior--real people--not bots and widgets.  Data is only as good as your ability to extract the story it tells in human terms.

 

Showman, Beauty and the Beast and Pitch Perfect (1, 2 & 3) are all about the fundamental drive people have for affiliation and acceptance.  Social connection is essential to our emotional and physical health.  Social exclusion, from giving a toddler "time-outs" to outright rejection and bullying, triggers the same areas of the brain as physical pain.  

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5 Reasons Social Media 'Cleanses' Are Kinda Bullsh*t

5 Reasons Social Media 'Cleanses' Are Kinda Bullsh*t | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
You know you'll just go back.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Mindless cleanses won't "cure" mindless social media use.  Without thinking through your goals, you will end up unhappy and beating yourself up for the wrong reasons.  Social media and digital communications are too intertwined in our daily life to have a cleanse be a productive solution without considering what you're doing and why.  Are you connecting or hiding out?  Are you getting information or procrastinating?  If a cleanse forces you to think through what's of value to you, great.  Give it a go.   But just like crash diets, the key is lifestyle change.  That means doing the really hard work first -- identifying your goals and values. 

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Is Binge-Playing Video Games Bad For You?

Is Binge-Playing Video Games Bad For You? | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
Satchell Drakes and I talk about how we typically work through games and how binging television on Netflix impacts our habits in 2018. We also speak with Pamela Rutledge, Ph.D., director of the Media Psychology Research Center, who puts the binge-absorption of media into perspective.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Why is "binge" consumption applied to TV and video games but not novels?  Technophobia.  While balance is important, there's nothing wrong with disrupting the traditional TV business model that doles out weekly episodes, manipulating you with cliffhangers, and deciding for yourself how much you want to consume and when in the narrative it makes sense for YOUR brain to stop.  If you find you're losing too much time having fun like this, you can always set a timer.  This is NOT pathology.  This is the development of self-regulation.

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The Best “Digital Detox” Is No Detox At All

The Best “Digital Detox” Is No Detox At All | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
But unplugging everything without undertaking self-examination is like trying to lose weight by going on a fast — you don’t learn how to eat healthier, so your bad habits come back. Rutledge thinks there’s a better, more durable way to do a digital detox. And, for most people, the better way is not to do a detox at all.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Mindfulness can be applied to a lot of things--including technology use.  Paying attention to what you use, when and why will help you evaluate how it makes you feel, whether it's of value and being present with your choices can actually make you appreciate what you decide to do more.  

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The Psychological Effects Of Signing Off Social Media - 1A

The Psychological Effects Of Signing Off Social Media - 1A | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
Speak Freely
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Social media is a tool--the key is figuring out how to use it to meet your goals.  That means actually taking the time to figure out what your goals are and if each social media platform is a benefit or a cost.  Goals  help you set personal boundaries (such as unfriending or putting time limits on use) that keep your experience positive and in support of your goals.

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Meet Molly, the Kid Who Never Stops Inventing - GE Commercial - YouTube

Charming ad that rewarding the creativity and innovation that drives engineering

Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Positive role models do  a lot of good.  If you're a parent who has read the delightful Rosie Revere Engineer to your kids (or my fav, Iggy Peck Architect which is currently free on Kindle Unlimited) to encourage exploration of STEM fields, then show them this clever GE commercial about Molly.  This is a charming story that shows how creativity and innovation can develop into interesting and rewarding careers.  We spend so much time worrying about the down side of media, we forget it has the potential to leverage positive and empowering messages and model desired behaviors (without being pedantic and heavy-handed.)  Nice job @GE!

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This NFL App Lets Fans Paint Their Faces With AR - VRScout

This NFL App Lets Fans Paint Their Faces With AR - VRScout | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
Share TweetYou can now put on a selfie game face without dealing with all the messy grease paint. Face painting is a huge part of sports culture, particularly in the US. But (excuse the pun) let’s face it: not everybody has the time, patience and skin complexion to achieve that perfect artistic look that will …
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Bravo to #NFL and #budlight! Great use of AR to ramp up affiliation and sense of ownership through creativity and (virtual) content creation.

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