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Rescooped by Martin Sturmer from Curation Revolution!

SEO and Data Got A THING Going On | ScentTrail Marketing [going viral]

SEO and Data Got A THING Going On | ScentTrail Marketing [going viral] | MEDIACLUB |

Had a brief conversation with Brian Yanish (@MartingHits) this morning via comments and spent the day trying to figure out the implications of a single thought:

Data (the content we create and curate) is the NETWORK now.

We've moved so far from Sun MicroSystems The Computer Is the Network. Heck we have the equivalent of the most powerful Sun MicroSystem in our pockets now. This thought created many implications such as:

* My post becomes OUR post.

* The Data Is The Network.

* Move from creator to curator and back again.

* We wait for The Great Data Pumpkin.

* We are all publishers now.

Had a fun day thanks to Brian. Hope you have fun reading about why we are all rebel disruptors now. Put on your beret, raise your fist and see if you agree the data is the network.

Here is to the rebel disruptors in all of us!

Curation Of SEO and Data Got A Thing Going On
Added a link to a great Google Plus discussion you can become part of here:

With over 300 views in less than 24 hours SEO and Data Got A Thing Going On is going viral thanks to 22 Retweets, 5 Facebook Likes and 7 Plus 1s. I'm curating and link the conversation here: .

Join Us.

Via Martin (Marty) Smith
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Rescooped by Martin Sturmer from Content Curation World!

Curators: A Herculean Task Is Ahead of You - and Be Careful

Curators: A Herculean Task Is Ahead of You - and Be Careful | MEDIACLUB |

Steven Rosenbaum has an interesting article on Fast Company, outlining the reasons why curation is here to stay and the importance that curators will play in your information consumption diet.


He writes: "...So anyone who steps up and volunteers to curate in their area of knowledge and passion is taking on a Herculean task.


They're going to stand between the web and their readers, using all of the tools at their disposal to "listen" to the web, and then pull out of the data stream nuggets of wisdom, breaking news, important new voices, and other salient details.


It's real work, and requires a tireless commitment to being engaged and ready to rebroadcast timely material.


While there may be an economic benefit for being a "thought leader" and "trusted curator," it's not going to happen overnight.


Which is to say, being a superhero is often a thankless job.


The growth in content, both in terms of pure volume and the speed of publishing, has raised some questions about what best practices are in the curation space."


He also has some pretty straightforward advice on what, as a curator, you should never do:


"1. If you don't add context, or opinion, or voice and simply lift content, it's stealing.


2. If you don't provide attribution, and a link back to the source, it's stealing.


3. If you take a large portion of the original content, it's stealing.


4. If someone asks you not to curate their material, and you don't respect that request, it's stealing.


5. Respect published rights. If images don't allow creative commons use, reach out to the image creator--don't just grab it and ask questions later."


And he definitely has a point on all of these. 


Recommended. 7/10


Read the full article: 

Via Robin Good
Jonathan Rattray Clark's comment, April 18, 2012 1:14 AM
Scooping it .........thanks Robin I really like your curation .... And value your wisdom seems there is purpose to my constant information minning as and educator artist and passionate information collector .......I find it incredibly exciting to find fresh thinking and response to the living world around us and in particular our individual passions. Thank you for your wisdom
Robin Good's comment, April 18, 2012 1:16 AM
Thank you Jonathan. Glad to be of help and inspiration to you.

Tony Gu's comment, April 20, 2012 1:30 AM
I am really enjoying reading this article.
I found that the way Robin Good curate this article truly practice the ‘No Stealing’ rules. Thanks for sharing this with all of us. Big up!
Rescooped by Martin Sturmer from Social Media Content Curation!

3 Ways Content “Curation” Can Boost Content “Creation”

3 Ways Content “Curation” Can Boost Content “Creation” | MEDIACLUB |

Content curation seems to be the only sanity-saving cure to information overload! Still, content marketers often face the dilemma of weighing the pros and cons of content creation versus content curation.


We have been looking at curation and creation as a two separate practices. Yet I beg to differ: content curation can give a huge boost to content creation and that is the key point I want to make in this article.


Content curation can help in refining created content in three different ways.

1. Curated Content Can Inspire Topics For Created Content...

2. Build On Curated Content To Create Your Own Content...

3. Use Curated Content As A “Teaser” To Drive Traffic To Your Own Content...


I can’t think of a better way to sum up this article than sharing the following quote:
"Strangely enough, curation shifts the balance of power back to brands and publications. While anyone can make content, the decision to gather it, and present it by trusted content curators has more risk, and therefore more value"...


[read full article]

Via janlgordon, Giuseppe Mauriello
janlgordon's comment, November 22, 2011 3:21 PM
Hi Beth,
I agree with you, I love the feeling of community and the collective wisdom, and you know "curation resonates with me":-)
janlgordon's comment, November 22, 2011 3:22 PM
Thanks so much for rescooping and sharing on twitter:-)
Pittsburgh Tote Bag Project's comment, November 25, 2011 9:17 PM
This has me thinking critically about how we are integrating social media. Inviting interaction has been a huge challenge. We are stimulating new conversations in real world time, but that's not reflected in comments and so forth. I like using Scoop.It widgets to get the newest scoop onto the bog in a timely manner and take some time to reflect on post content.
Rescooped by Martin Sturmer from Content Curation World!

No More Media Gatekeepers: Curators Are All We Need

No More Media Gatekeepers: Curators Are All We Need | MEDIACLUB |

Giuseppe Mauriello: This is my “scoop” article for today. I found this article written by Suw Charman-Anderson in November of 2006 from her first professional blog “Strange Attractor”,  now permanently moved to


Suw is journalist, social technologist consultant and writer, one of the UK’s social media pioneers. 

Returning to her article... the author describes the scenario of the digital industry at the time (2006), then she raises some interesting  points about the need of content curation and the importance of the curator role. Here are some gems excerpted from it:

We already have more movies available than any one person can watch; more videos on YouTube; more blogs… more everything. It’s not like we’re starting from a point of scarcity here. And the flood of stuff is going to turn into a rampaging torrent as more people get online and more people get excited by their ability to participate and create.

In the past, the media acted as gatekeepers.


They were the ones that went to the movie previews…
They were the ones who got the advance copy of the game…
They were the arbiters of taste, the people in the know, the ones with the connections needed to get at culture before us plebs got at it.

But we don’t need gatekeepers anymore. We don’t need people who stand between us and our stuff, deciding what to tell us about and what to ignore. We don’t need arbiters of taste.

We do, however, still need help. There’s just too much stuff around for us to know what’s out there, to keep up with what’s good, what works for us, what is worth investigation. What we need are curators.

We need people who can gather together the things that are of interest to us, things that fit with our tastes or challenge us in interesting ways, things that enrich our lives and help us enjoy our time rather than waste it on searching.

Curators already exist. Some are people: Bloggers who sift through tonnes of stuff in order to highlight what they like, and who, if you have the same taste as them, can be invaluable to discovering new things to like.

But curation of the web has barely started. Much of what you could call curation that exists today is flawed: too many noisy opinions and not enough capacity to understand what I as an individual want…


I loved this article and title that the author chose for it.

Read the original article here:

Via Giuseppe Mauriello, Robin Good
Dasom Ssomy Kim's comment, May 8, 2013 5:52 AM
Content curation, not gatekeeping. people can choose
Rescooped by Martin Sturmer from Content Curation World!

Content Curators Will Be The New Great (Specialized) Newspapers [Video]

Robin Good: John McCarus, SVP for Brand Content at Digitas, ignites an interesting panel about content creation vs content curation.


This is the second in a series of three videos highlighting a 2012 conversation on the future of media on the social web organized by Ben Elowitz, CEO of Wetpaint.

The nicely edited video, brings up in its four minutes, some valuable takes and opinions on how curation is perceived, used and modulated to achieve different results and objectives.


From mere republishing and copying of someone else materials without attribution or credit (certainly not something to be categorized under "curation") to the new cadre of emerging journalists, who not only write, but also monitor, research, pre-digest and cull the most interesting content - not written by them - for their own audiences.


Key takeaways:

A curator is an editor, essentially. You become a trusted source by doing the hard work for your audience and telling them what’s important, whether you’ve written it or not.

Traditionally that’s been the role of great newspapers; now that function is being spread across the web.

Erick Schonfeld, TechCrunch

-> Publishers have a love / hate relationship with curators.


-> Curators help to expand a publisher’s reach, but the publisher risks losing credit (and traffic).


-> Curators who link back and republish only enough to pique interest will keep publishers happy.


It’s like the forest episode of Planet Earth: the animal eats the nectar and sort of destroys the plant but spreads the pollen all over.

Jason Hirschhorn, Media ReDEFined


Interesting. 7/10


Original video: 


Full article: 

Via Robin Good
Jeff Makana's comment, March 2, 2012 3:34 AM
Great improvements on delivery of content Robin, Your analysis give the reader added insights. In support and solidarity!