Mechanical Engineering: Robotics and the Military
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Robots closer to being able to work together as a team - Computerworld

Robots closer to being able to work together as a team - Computerworld | Mechanical Engineering: Robotics and the Military | Scoop.it
Scientific Computing
Robots closer to being able to work together as a team
Computerworld
Computerworld - It's one thing for a robot to walk around your house and do the dishes or fold the laundry.
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Garrett Smith's comment, February 13, 2014 8:14 AM
Scientists at MIT are in the process of making computer programs that could operate massive units of robots that are meant to accomplish different tasks. It is difficult to try to make programs that will control one robot at a time, but when trying to control multiple, the task gets even more daunting. The scientists will show their product at the International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems in Paris in May.
Garrett Smith's comment, February 18, 2014 7:57 AM
With robots like BigDog and Atlas, made by Boston Dynamics, it makes people want to make these enthusing robots autonomous. DeepMind Technologies has recently been obtained by Google and it is thought that they want to use their technology to apply research into making robots autonomous as well. DARPA has also held competitions to see who can make the most efficient software to operate Atlas.
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Robots of the future: Q & A with DARPA Director Arati Prabhakar

Robots of the future: Q & A with DARPA Director Arati Prabhakar | Mechanical Engineering: Robotics and the Military | Scoop.it
For the past two days, engineering teams from around the world have been competing in a unique competition that showcases some of the most advanced capabilities in the field of robotics
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Garrett Smith's comment, February 13, 2014 7:58 AM
The DARPA Robotics Challenge Trials started Friday, December 20th. The two day excursion is at Homestead Miami Speedway and is made to challenge he robots on their "ability to perform disaster-response tasks" such as "clearing pieces of debris, driving a vehicle, traversing uneven terrain and climbing a ladder." Seventeen teams are in the contest and some groups will qualify for DARPA Robotics Finals.
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Rich Hooper, PhD, PE: Robotics Engineer

You want to be a robotics engineer? Learn about it here.
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Garrett Smith's comment, February 12, 2014 8:11 AM
Naturally, the military can be generally unsafe place for people. This is why using robotics in the military is such a practical idea. This does not mean that robots do the fighting, but machines such as mine sweepers, ammunition transfer systems, and predator drones make the job much safer for people.
Garrett Smith's comment, February 12, 2014 8:17 AM
Another commonly unsafe place for people is underwater. Undersea robots make more difficult and dangerous tasks much easier. They have been used on oil rigs and even on the ocean floors for a variety of different reasons.
Garrett Smith's comment, February 17, 2014 8:17 AM
A common place for new robots to be used is in the air. The navy has developed a very small plane called "Silver Fox" and it uses an engine similar to ones used in R/C planes. It is completely autonomous and its small stealthy structure makes it perfect for reconnaissance missions.
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Universal Robots Expands Distribution in Eastern and Western United States - The Herald | HeraldOnline.com (press release)

Universal Robots Expands Distribution in Eastern and Western United States - The Herald | HeraldOnline.com (press release) | Mechanical Engineering: Robotics and the Military | Scoop.it
Universal Robots Expands Distribution in Eastern and Western United States The Herald | HeraldOnline.com (press release) The Danish manufacturer of industrial robot arms is expanding the network of distributors, adding Numatic Engineering in...
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Garrett Smith's comment, February 17, 2014 7:58 AM
Making Universal Robots took huge amounts of research to be developed. They have made the U5, which can hold 11.3 pounds, and the U10, which can hold 22.6 pounds. The six joints in the arm allow for more capability and mobility. The robots can weigh as little as 40 pounds and can reach up to 51 inches.
Garrett Smith's comment, February 18, 2014 8:06 AM
Universal Robots, since 2012, has be come a catalyst in the robot world. They have been constructing robots that are "user-friendly and light weight". These robots are made to work with employees and make the work place more efficient. They have had to increase distribution in North America because the demand for them has gone up immensely.
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The Culture of Military Innovation

The Culture of Military Innovation | Mechanical Engineering: Robotics and the Military | Scoop.it
This book studies the impact of cultural factors on the course of military innovations. One would expect that countries accustomed to similar technologies would undergo analogous changes in their perception of and approach to warfare. However, the intellectual history of the Revolution in Military Affairs (RMA) in Russia, the US, and Israel indicates the opposite. The US developed technology and weaponry for about a decade without reconceptualizing the existing paradigm about the nature of warfare. Soviet 'new theory of victory' represented a conceptualization which chronologically preceded technological procurement. Israel was the first to utilize the weaponry on the battlefield, but was the last to develop a conceptual framework that acknowledged its revolutionary implications.Utilizing primary sources that had previously been completely inaccessible, and borrowing methods of analysis from political science, history, anthropology, and cognitive psychology, this book suggests a cultural explanation for this puzzling transformation in warfare.The Culture of Military Innovation offers a systematic, thorough, and unique analytical approach that may well be applicable in other perplexing strategic situations. Though framed in the context of specific historical experience, the insights of this book reveal important implications related to conventional, subconventional, and nonconventional security issues. It is therefore an ideal reference work for practitioners, scholars, teachers, and students of security studies.
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Garrett Smith's comment, February 17, 2014 8:13 AM
The Soviets began talking more and more about a new military revolution, one triggered by a change in technology. The new ways in which machines were used in ground and air warfare, like tanks and planes, shaped this new military revolution. Another "Military-Technical Revolution" began when the production of missiles and nuclear weapons became more and more common.
Garrett Smith's comment, February 18, 2014 8:13 AM
The Soviets theorized that new "military development" would be headed by new technology and machines. Technology that was looked in to was, "microelectronics, lasers, kinetic energy, radio frequencies, electro-optics, electro magnetic pulse, remote control, and particle beam technology". They also signaled out "automated decision support systems and telecommunications" as being very important advancements and payed particular attention to them.