Matulaitis-Mandeville A Midsummer's Night's Dream
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Image: Men playing women

Image: Men playing women | Matulaitis-Mandeville A Midsummer's Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Chris & Matt 's insight:

Image: This cartoon or image depicts how men use to always play women roles in Shakespearean plays. This is odd because many of the characters in a Mid Summer Night's Dream are in fact women. For Example, Hermia, Helena, Hippolyta, and Titiana. This is striking because most of his plays were extremely popular despite the fact that there are no women involved in his plays. This shows how the emotions and lines of the play draw the eyes of the audience off of the idea of men playing women and onto the idea of how great and emotional the play really was. Young males mainly played the parts of the female because they have yet to hit adolescence and their voices are still high and female like. This picture shows how Shakespeare's plays brought the people together and allowed them to enjoy the arts, and realize that it didn't matter who played the roles, or what props were being used, but instead the movement of his words and comedic puns.    

 

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Digital image. Shakespearean Image of Womenhood, 28 Sept. 2011. Web. 9 Dec. 2014. <http://shakespearen-image-of-womanhood.blogspot.com/2011/09/week1-gender-roles-in-elizabethan.html>.

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Source: The 1 Corinthians and A Midsummer Nights Dream

Source: The 1 Corinthians and A Midsummer Nights Dream | Matulaitis-Mandeville A Midsummer's Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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Source: This article written by Steven J. Doloff  expresses a perfect source that Shakespeare may have utilized in the making of A Midsummer Night's Dream. Some of Bottom's lines and actions are also seen in the book of 1 Corinthians. For example, the Speech performed by Bottom after he awakens without the ass's head closely resembles an excerpt from the book of 1 Corinthians. 

    Along with Bottom's lines being closely related, the way he is perceived is also very similar. Bottom and the rest of the mechanical's are thought to be foolish, and their performance is perceived as comedic and poor. This same reaction was seen when Paul explains Christ's message. The book of 1 Corinthians explains that after Paul talks about Christ's message there were many faces of bewilderment and thoughts of foolishness. The same reactions were seen by the Duke Athens, Theseus, his wife Hippolyta, and  his peers after the performance that Bottom and the rest of the mechanicals had performed. 

 

 Doloff, Steven J. "Bottom's Greek Audience: 1 CORINTHIANS 1.21-25 And Shakespeare's A MIDSUMMER NIGHT's DREAM." Explicator 65.4 (2007): 200-201. Literary Reference Center. Web. 8 Dec. 2014.

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Literary Criticism: The Comedy of the Lovers

Literary Criticism: The Comedy of the Lovers | Matulaitis-Mandeville A Midsummer's Night's Dream | Scoop.it

 

 

Chris & Matt 's insight:

In this Literary Criticism by M.E Comtois, the author breaks down the 4 lovers. The criticism closely analyzes the lovers, Helena, Hermia, Lysander, and Demetrius, as not being part of the "main plot, but they are just one voice in a four part madrigal of the nobility, lovers, artisans, and fairies." The voice, as the author argues, has been written to provide as much comedy as is provided by the artisans. The scenes shaped by Shakespeare have provided a comic victim. Only in the last act do the lovers have a function of romantic comedy. Each lover that is created by Shakespeare is holding the same common qualities. They each contain the quality of being engrossed in their feelings and discoveries about romantic love. They each experience love as magic or better yet, something they cannot control. In the scene where Demetrius and Helena are in the woods, they act as if  "they were still at court, as if the woods where just a group of woods." The reason for the "magic-like" love is the fault of Oberon and his trickster side-kick Puck. A special herb was shot by Cupid meant to pierce a thousand hearts. When the juices of the herb are put into the eyes of a lover, the person will fall in love with whatever they see first. The "change" is uncontrollable and makes it seem closely related to magic because it can make a person love someone they truly don't. M.E Comtois analyzes the change happening many times. "There are in fact 23 configurations the lovers pass through before Puck manipulates the final "setting to partners." Four of these configurations are in the first act and seven are in the second. The final twelve constitute the climax in their private story. And it is the very complexity and variety, which urge the round dance as a form, by which the action can be understood." 

 

Comtois, M. E. "The Comedy Of The Lovers In A Midsummer Night's Dream." Essays In Literature 12.1 (1985): 15-25. Literary Reference Center. Web. 9 Dec. 2014.

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Animaniacs - A Midsummer Nights Dream - YouTube

The Warners' unique interpretation of Shakespeare, complete with Batman and Robin.
Chris & Matt 's insight:

 Video: In this short 2 minute video by the Animaniacs, they show their interpretation of Shakespeare's A Midsummer's Night Dream. Specifically they focus on Puck's speech at the end of the play. The Animaniacs use comedy to break down the speech and explain the importance of Shakespeare's work. Puck addresses the audience about what they had just seen. Puck, being a liar and a trickster, is telling the audience that if they neglected to like it then it was all a dream. This is Shakespeare talking through one of his characters to address the audience to "give me your hands if we be friends" or to clap for the actors. The Animaniacs use humorous comments to add to the comedy that Shakespeare has already established. They add modern jokes to connect to the audience and get a good laugh out of them. 

 

 "Animaniacs - A Midsummer Nights Dream." YouTube. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Dec. 2014.

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Image: Men playing women

Image: Men playing women | Matulaitis-Mandeville A Midsummer's Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Chris & Matt 's insight:

Image: This cartoon or image depicts how men use to always play women roles in Shakespearean plays. This is odd because many of the characters in a Mid Summer Night's Dream are in fact women. For Example, Hermia, Helena, Hippolyta, and Titiana. This is striking because most of his plays were extremely popular despite the fact that there are no women involved in his plays. This shows how the emotions and lines of the play draw the eyes of the audience off of the idea of men playing women and onto the idea of how great and emotional the play really was. Young males mainly played the parts of the female because they have yet to hit adolescence and their voices are still high and female like. This picture shows how Shakespeare's plays brought the people together and allowed them to enjoy the arts, and realize that it didn't matter who played the roles, or what props were being used, but instead the movement of his words and comedic puns.    

 

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Digital image. Shakespearean Image of Womenhood, 28 Sept. 2011. Web. 9 Dec. 2014. <http://shakespearen-image-of-womanhood.blogspot.com/2011/09/week1-gender-roles-in-elizabethan.html>.

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Historical Article: Women and eloquence in Shakespeare

Historical Article: Women and eloquence in Shakespeare | Matulaitis-Mandeville A Midsummer's Night's Dream | Scoop.it

 

 

Chris & Matt 's insight:

Historical Article: This article by Penny Gay explains how Shakespeare centered on allowing the females in his work to speak with eloquence, which was not the case in the real world during the Elizabethan Era. The female roles played in Shakespeare's elaborate performances had the ability to play a keen role in the plot. along with being incorporated in the plot, the female role consisted of having to speak an enormous amount of speeches that were vital in keeping the play alive and going. This idea is seen numerous times in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. For example, without the female roles one of the major plots of the play would not be established, that being the trouble with the four lovers. The four lovers would not exist if the female roles were not there and they had little to nothing to say. Helena is the perfect example for having a vital speech in the play, she is seen yelling at the other three lovers beginning with the words, "...Oh Spite! Oh Hell! I see you are all bent.." This would be considered improper for women during this age, and is odd that Shakespeare would incorporate this, and make it so important. This is just another unique idea that Shakespeare has made present in his work, and adds to the greatness and popularity that he is known for today. Shakespeare is very well known for creating superb roles for women, influencing many future artists, like Jane Austen. Jane Austen was very familiar with Shakespeare and Incorporated his use of female roles in some of her work. This shows how influential he really was, and how different he was from the time period and other writers.  

 

Gay, Penny. "Women And Eloquence In Shakespeare And Austen." Shakespeare (1745-0918) 6.4 (2010): 463-477. Literary Reference Center. Web. 9 Dec. 2014.

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