Math in the world
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Math in the world
chance eliciting student thinking
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A mostly mobile internet

A mostly mobile internet | Math in the world | Scoop.it
In 2013 the internet will become a mostly mobile medium. Who will be the winners and losers?

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What is the best pitching stat?

What is the best pitching stat? | Math in the world | Scoop.it
Our Eye on Baseball crew has identified 10 candidates as possibly the best stat in baseball for judging pitchers. Who is the winner? We make our picks and ask for you to make yours.

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Math Encounters -- Five Balls, Two Hands: The Patterns of Juggling -- Colin Wright (Presentation)

Experience the fascinating world of juggling as mathematician Colin Wright defies gravity with his dynamic performance. See how math that was first used to understand juggling led to the creation of entirely new throwing patterns for tossing the balls.

 

I feel that this is a good example of how mathematic relate to real-world, a good example of how to build a mathematic tool that helps describe a complex activity and a good material for contextualize and decontextualize.

 

In terms of teaching, I believe to ask students to reproduce the statements and justifications he made is a good activity to challenge students’ mathematical literacy skills. Also, with help of the following materials (a Juggling Simulate tool and an additional reading), students can understand how he build this tool and what this tool afford to do. Students can try to compare and contrast the similarity of juggling with dancing or music in terms of the mathematical model of them. (With more additional materials for dancing or music.) Or, they can do a research of unexpected mathematic in the world (as he describe in the talk).

 

Additional reading of Juggling:

http://www.qedcat.com/articles/juggling_survey.pdf

Juggling Simulator:

http://www.kingscascade.com/JugglingSimulator.html

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USA TODAY Education - Democracy TODAY

USA TODAY Education - Democracy TODAY | Math in the world | Scoop.it

US TODAY SNAPSHOTS always provides statistical data in a more fashion way. For example, this picture, which is a pie chart originally, is highlighting the section of too busy to vote.

However, it is not the largest section in the chart. In addition, the largest section is "other" which is another aspect that teachers could use in the class discussion.

I believe teacher can use the US TODAY SNAPSHOTS with the following questions:

What is the picture shows/highlights and hide?

What is the difference between traditional statistical graph and this type of graph?

What is the source of the data? Is it bias or unbiased?

 

Students can search online by using the key word "US TODAY SNAPSHOTS", and there will be a lot of picture available.

 

  

 

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Charts & graphs News, Video and Gossip - Gawker

Charts & graphs News, Video and Gossip - Gawker | Math in the world | Scoop.it
Red Sports vs. Blue Sports. Obama Hires Internet's Favorite Pretty Chart Guy. The Shake, Rattle, Decline and Fall of American Empire.

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New Study Shows the Mobile Web Will Rule by 2015 [STATS]

In a dense, 87-page report, Morgan Stanley analysts have charted the most important online trends and predicted the future of the Internet. In addition to forecasting more onlin...

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OMG! Texting turns twenty

OMG! Texting turns twenty | Math in the world | Scoop.it
Happy bday txt msg! :DON DECEMBER 3rd 1992 a young Vodafone engineer wished his boss "Merry Christmas" by SMS (short message service). This is widely regarded as the...

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interactivemap-closedguardconcepts.html

interactivemap-closedguardconcepts.html | Math in the world | Scoop.it

Also:

http://img509.imageshack.us/img509/9831/eddiebravohalfguardgameod2.jpg

http://passmyguard.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/bjj_concept_map.jpg?w=848

 


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Evidence for God from Probability

Evidence for God from Probability | Math in the world | Scoop.it

http://pleaseconvinceme.com/2012/evidence-for-god-from-probability/

 

This ariticle first introduce the

multiplication law of probability and Statistical Zero (which is 1/100,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000)
and

"This is an important number to remember, because when the odds of something happening reach this number, you can effectively say that there is a ZERO percent chance of it happening at all. That’s important to know as we start to examine the probability of life occurring in our universe…"

 

Then this ariticle give a set of requirements related to the Universe and the Galaxy

 

which include

 

Correct local abundance and distribution of dark matter
Correct relative abundances of different exotic mass particles
Correct decay rates of different exotic mass particles

 

 and many

322 of them.

 

Thus

"Now look at the (very generous) odds we’ve just calculated for the existence of a life-bearing planet like Earth existing in a star system like ours and a galaxy like ours:

1/10^322 = 10^272 Times Less Likely than Statistical Zero

 

So

 

It’s Statistically Impossible. So there must be a GOD create all this.

 

I believe this is an unexcepted conclusion for students to see, and in order to understand the argument, they need to understand the multiplication law of probability (which is easy )and Statistical Zero (which is the focus)

I think this will be a good chance for the students to do a little research on it and find out why we had such concept and when we could use this concept? (as well as when we cannot) so that it helps them to either against the conclusion of this article, or refine the conclusion.

 

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Cole Eppstein's comment, December 9, 2012 3:45 PM
Really interesting! Maybe a way to preserve the math concepts and avoid the religious and philosophical aspects of the problem is focusing on the statistic without the conclusion. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drake_equation
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What are some of the most ridiculous proofs in mathematics?

What are some of the most ridiculous proofs in mathematics? | Math in the world | Scoop.it

Answer (1 of 9): Proof that 2^(1/3) is irrational:

Suppose not. Then 2^(1/3) = p/q, for some p and q, so p^3 = q^3 + q^3, contradicting Fermat's Last Theorem.

Note that this also works if we replace the 3 with a larger integer.

 

link: http://www.quora.com/Mathematics/What-are-some-of-the-most-ridiculous-proofs-in-mathematics

 

This is a typical joke that only mathematicians get. I think it will be kind of cool if we can start the lesson of proof by this type of thing. However, maybe even our students cannot see the punch line in this one. So I decide to make one. But, when I try to make one, I realize how hard it is to construct a proof like this, and just to see this entire post, this one is outstandingly funny. Therefore, I recall our discussion about proof in class, and I believe it will as foster students' thinking about why we proof the way we proof. After all, as one of the comment says, this is not just hammer ... It is nuclear weapon for a nail. 

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Global warming stopped 16 years ago, reveals Met Office report quietly released... and here is the chart to prove it

Global warming stopped 16 years ago, reveals Met Office report quietly released... and here is the chart to prove it | Math in the world | Scoop.it
The figures, which have triggered debate among climate scientists, reveal that from the beginning of 1997 until August 2012, there was no discernible rise in aggregate global temperatures.

   

    One reason for me to scoop this article is because that global warming is a controversial issue. There are a lot of artices/data either for or against it, yet the data of both sides seem convincing. Also, discussing this content in a different time (summer/winter) may affect students initial stand point. Therefore, it will be an opportunity to help students develop the habit of using statistical data rather than intuition.

 

For this topic, students can think about the following questions:

 

1. what measure does this article use? is it reasonable to use such a measure? what measure is missing? what is the impact of only using this one measure?

 

2. look at articles that support global warming, do they use the same data as this article?
if not, what are the differences? and how do they make a difference?
sample article http://homework.uoregon.edu/pub/class/es202/ov2.html

 

3.what makes each side of this issue convincing? if the students themselves are going to find a conclusion for this issue, what measure/measures are they going to use?

 

Before teaching this lesson, it will be good if students can have some knowledge about different types of measurement, such as mean meidan mode, sd, variance. Also, the teacher might have the opportunity to introduce some measures that students are not famillar with, such as 5year average (as it has been used quite often in global temperature).

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