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The 52 Week Money Challenge - you game? #52weekmoneychallenge - StuckAtHomeMom.com

The 52 Week Money Challenge - you game? #52weekmoneychallenge - StuckAtHomeMom.com | math education | Scoop.it
The 52 Week Money Challenge is the MOST popular way to save money. Adults, Children, Schools, Churches, everyone is getting involved! Start saving ..
Nancy Carrington's insight:

I originally found this idea as a pin on Pinterest, but with a closer look, my math geek senses began to tingle. I had found a functional relationship!!  Is it linear? Is it a quadratic relationship? Is it exponential?  This web page could be presented to high school students as a lesson or a warm up in which students are tasked to find a relationship between the number of the week and the account balance based on the table of values.  This activity could be adjusted so students are presented with the simple idea of the savings account, ask them to find the account totals for the first 4 weeks, then ask how much will the account hold at the end of the year and after n weeks.  This last question will guide students to formulate an equation to represent the situation.  Following the activity, both answers and methods can be discussed.   This activity presents students with a context with is easy to conceptualize while also guiding students to represent this context in an abstract way.  Also,  by asking students to make a guess as to what type of function this is at the beginning of the activity, students can begin making connections between table values and the corresponding type of function.  I will leave both viewers and students the challenge of finding the relationship! :)

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The Website that EVERY Math Teacher Should Know About!

The Website that EVERY Math Teacher Should Know About! | math education | Scoop.it
Explore math with desmos.com, a free online graphing calculator
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Why should I care about this site, you ask?  First and foremost, the Desmos graphing calculator is a free online tool which can easily be made available to students; whether by a set of laptops, a day in the computer lab, at home, or the teacher’s computer and a projector.  Also, this website is easy to use and offers teachers a tool which will help when discussing a wide range of graphs in the classroom. For example, many math enthusiasts know the roles which coefficients m and b play in good ole slope intercept form of a linear equation.  However, students may not grasp onto these roles so quickly.  Desmos allows you to graph a line simply as y=mx+b and create sliders for the coefficients m and b.  Don’t know what “sliders” are? Click the link and see for youself!

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Easy Math Magic Tricks - Birthday Date Calculations

http://www.WorstJokeEver.Com Here comes a math trick to play upon calcualting your birthday date. Suprise your friends and family with this magic calculation...
Nancy Carrington's insight:

Can you figure out how this math magic trick works???  I absolutely love this math magic trick!  And what I loved even more was figuring out how this trick is done! Many of our middle school and high school students can figure this out if given the opportunity. There are many motivations for presenting this problem to students.  Ideally, this video would be first presented to students as is, so students can participate in the math magic trick.  After, students will be asked “how does this math magic trick work?”  At the middle school level, this problem and others similar to this problem challenges students to recognize the need to create algebraic expressions to represent the steps and involve variable(s) for the unknowns. At the high school level, this would be a great warm up exercise for students to practice writing algebraic expressions.  Also, overall this is a great problem solving exercise and simply doing the magic trick in part one is great for increasing motivation for the second portion of the mini lesson. 

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Why Is Black Friday Called Black Friday?

Why Is Black Friday Called Black Friday? | math education | Scoop.it
The term "Black Friday" was coined in the 1960s. Find out here how the phrase came to be.
Nancy Carrington's insight:

From an early age, most American's have heard the phrase "Black Friday" used in reference to the day after Thanksgiving.  However, the reason behind the name is not always clear.  Before I was introduced to rationale behind the name, I thought all of the dirty grey and slushy snow on the streets from all the cars was why it was a “black” Friday.  I came to find out that there actually was a mathematical context behind the term, which many people may not know.  This article briefly explains the rationale of the phrase “Black Friday.” Due to the context of the phrase, this article could create some interest in the topic of profit loss and gain since this is a term many students will be familiar with, but may not be familiar with the rationale behind the phrase. This quick article could be used in a variety of subjects including accounting, economics, and mathematics. Specifically in middle school mathematics, this reading could introduce profit loss and gain, and lead into a larger lesson or a project.  For example, a great game which could be used to further illustrate these ideas is the game Lemonade Stand (http://www.coolmath-games.com/lemonade/ ).  At the end of whatever lesson chosen to illustrate the topic of profit and losses, there could be a brief discussion about how important Black Friday is to businesses if they are typically in the “red” up until this particular Friday. 

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Is Math a Feature of the Universe or a Feature of Human Creation? | Idea Channel | PBS

Math is invisible. Unlike physics, chemistry, and biology we can't see it, smell it, or even directly observe it in the universe. And so that has made a lot ...
Nancy Carrington's insight:

Math class is not commonly regarded as a class containing much discussion, especially discussion about opinions and philosophies.  Yet this video aims to do just that. The video discusses the thought-provoking philosophies about mathematics and its origins; basically it’s a chicken or the egg type of discussion.  While the contents of the video are not necessarily required for students to learn, the video does offer insight into the world of mathematics as mathematicians see it. Many sources urge teachers to help students experience the types of tasks mathematicians do, and discussion is one of these tasks.   Asking students about their view of mathematics after seeing the video can create an interesting conversation, and also inform the teacher about the individual views of students.  Again, since the video would be used more to promote interest in students about math and create a classroom discussion, I would suggest this video and discussion only be had when class is on schedule.  For example, the lesson could be implemented at the end of a lesson to give students a break, or maybe one of those awkward pep rally kind of days where time is limited.  

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Metra Home

Metra Home | math education | Scoop.it
Northeast Illinois commuter rail system. Overview of services plus maps, schedules, fares, ticket information, on-line ticketing, stations, and more.
Nancy Carrington's insight:

Have you ever wondered how ticket fare prices are decided?  Could there be a functional relationship between the price of the ticket and the miles travelled?  Would the function be linear?...quadratic?...step? Does the amount of passengers per stop effect the price? I think an interesting lesson could be built around students finding the pattern or correlation, if one exists, between the price of tickets and some other variable.  Through the Metra website, students have access to the ticket prices per “zone.”  Students may find that there is a pattern between the zone and pricing, or some may further investigate the distances corresponding to the zones and use distance and pricing. The possibilities are vast if students are able to investigate the situation themselves.  Also, this lesson would be great to build students ideas of functions, and where and how functions exist in the real world.  

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Terminally-ill father who begged for unapproved cancer treatment died

Terminally-ill father who begged for unapproved cancer treatment died | math education | Scoop.it
Nick Auden, 41, from Denver, died from stage 4 melanoma on Friday surrounded by his wife Amy and his children Locky, seven, Hayley, five, and Evan, one.
Nancy Carrington's insight:

This is a saddening story of another soul losing their battle to cancer.  When I originally heard Auden’s story, he and his family were currently battling to qualify for either the drug trial, or the compassionate use trial. Although a controversial and close to heart topic for some, this story touches on many topics pertaining to statistics.  With proper guidance by the teacher, the article can provide a class discussion on the importance of drug trials, why people are turned away from drug trials, and teach about the “compassionate use” trails.  Since this article could spark heated debate, specific questions pertaining to these ideas should be used to keep students thinking about the statistical ideas in the article.  

 

Some possible questions to pose:

-What percentage of patients who participated in the trial had tumor shrinkage?

-Why did Auden not qualify for the drug trial?

-Based on the article, what is a “compassionate use” trial?

-Have your views on drug trials changed? ...remained the same? 

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