Content-Assessments
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Comprehensive Assessment: An Overview - YouTube

Kay Clarke's insight:

This video speaks a lot to how I feel about assessments.  It's main point is to move away from traditional assessments of students and moving more towards performance based assessments.  In the clip, it gives lots of examples of how students in other schools have been doing projects instead of written tests to demonstrate understanding.  This reminded me of Project Based Learning, a topic I learned about last year.  PBL is definitely the way that I would like to assess my students in math.  My mentor and I have definitely found ways to accomplis this in other dicsiplines, and Curriculum 2.0 builds it into our year with inquiry projects in science and social studies, but it seems like math is left to teachers to figure out how to incorporate more PBL and performance assessments into learning.  

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Addition of Fractions with Visual Representation

Addition of Fractions with Visual Representation | Content-Assessments | Scoop.it
A fun way to assess student understanding of equivalent fractions, addition of fractions, and relative size of fractions is this Brainy Activity. Students
Kay Clarke's insight:

My kids are currently working with fractions, and I was looking for a fun and creative way to check for their understanding of equivalent fractions as well as adding of fractions.  This project looks awesome! What I really like about this is that it is open ended in that all of my students brains could look different!  This also gives a chance for my kids to be creative and have fun with coloring and drawing.  In addition, they get a chance to tell a little about themselves and what is going on in their own brain.  As a teacher, this is an excellent way to assess student understanding in a way that does not have students regergitate information back to me.  As a student, although this is independent work, this does not look like an assessment to me!  Win win in my opinion.  Definitely going to run this by my mentor for our quiz tomorrow.

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Number CSI-Solve the "Crime" - Resources - Share My Lesson

Number CSI-Solve the "Crime" - Resources - Share My Lesson | Content-Assessments | Scoop.it
Students must analyze five pieces of evidence to eliminate nine of ten suspects. Ideal as an end of topic activity; students need to peform operations with fractions; ratios and decimals and also interpret their results in a different context.
Kay Clarke's insight:

I came across this when I subscribbed to ShareMyLesson.  Edutopia suggested it as a great source for Common Core Alligned resources.  Going through this, I was hesitant because unlike a lot of the exploration we do in class, this does not have multiple exit points in that there is a right or wrong answer.  However, I LOVED how there are multiple steps the student must go through in order to get the "suspect".  I like how it is set up because a studen can easily look back at the five parts and check their work for what they may have misunderstood.  Although this is actually made in Euros instead of dollars, I can easily go in and fix the currency (which is about 1.5X) right now and make the problem work.  I would definitely use this as an end of a unit type of activity because it has a lot of different skills students should demonstrate.  I think this would assess my students' knowledge without ticking them off that this is an assessment.

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A Favorite Formative Assessment: The Exit Slip

A Favorite Formative Assessment: The Exit Slip | Content-Assessments | Scoop.it
Updated 10/2013
When we think about all the different ways we check for understanding in the classroom, a go-to strategy for many teachers has always been the exit slip or exit ticket.
Kay Clarke's insight:

The "Exit Slip" is definitely a well known tactic for teachers to assess student understanding.  While my mentor is not exactly a fan of these, I feel a little differently.  This article pointed out some of the reasons why I feel like exit slips are beneifical in more ways than just straight up assessment.  What I like to do, which the article touched on, is give a space for students to write down how confident they feel with the topic.  They can write things like, "still confused" or "totally get it" or "almost there".  It's a way for me to gauge their understanding when sometimes it is difficult to do so in class-either because there are just too many kids or they are shy and don't want to speak up and look embarassed infront of everyone.  I also really liked how the article talked about it as a way for students to also reflect on teacher instructional practices.  I think this is a dual purpose assessment.  It can assess student understanding and give a quick snap shot, but also help the teacher plan their moves for the next lesson.  Helpful article for math assessments!

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Fraction treasure hunt - Resources - Share My Lesson

Fraction treasure hunt - Resources - Share My Lesson | Content-Assessments | Scoop.it
I used this treasure hunt for my class. It includes a mixture of 1 and 2 step problems relating to fractions and percentages.
Kay Clarke's insight:

My mentor uses scavenger hunts around the room as quick activators at the start of a lot of our lessons, so my kids would be used to doing something like this.  However, I would think one that was this indepth and honestly pretty difficult would be a great way to end a unit.  They wouldn't think they were being traditionally assessed because they are moving aorund the room, and acitivity they associate with fun and our activators.  I'm not sure how I would work it so that kids were working by themselves, or even if I want them working individually.  However, a treasure hunt is always a fun way for students to get out of their seats and demonstrate what they know.

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