MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning
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MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning
Examining the development of the Massive Open Online Course and its variants.
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Pro: Are online courses good for higher education?

Pro: Are online courses good for higher education? | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it
The University of Washington's plan to offer online courses with Coursera creates more choices for students and potentially brings in revenue.
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The corridor of uncertainty: Shades of MOOC

The corridor of uncertainty: Shades of MOOC | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it

"There are many types of open online courses for large groups of participants that are labelled MOOCs. Most of them are indeed open, online and aimed at a mass following but their pedagogies differ. There's a big difference between the pioneer MOOCs of Downes, Siemens, Cormier, Couros etc, built around connections, dialogue, flexibility and collaboration, and the streamlined instructional MOOCs of Coursera, EdX and Udacity."


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Coursera Fantasy: Yes, Plagiarism: How Sad is That?

Coursera Fantasy: Yes, Plagiarism: How Sad is That? | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it

As I try to finish up writing out my reflections on the Coursera course experience so far (previous post was about the "Course Criteria" as defined by Coursera itself), I have to write about the plagiarism, depressing though it may be. I've written about it over at Google+ (and in that way I learned about plagiarism problems over at the Internet History Coursera course also, so it's not just our course), but I see I haven't posted anything here. It's a complex topic; I'll write out here as much as I can stand... if I get too depressed, I'll just have to stop, ha ha.

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Badge System Design: seven ways of looking at a badge system

Badge System Design: seven ways of looking at a badge system | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it
Badge system design can be considered in a variety of ways.

 

Below you’ll find the seven different possible categorizations listed with a few representations of each type of thinking. This is not an exhaustive list by any means: it’s simply an opportunity to unpack our influences and perceptions as we begin the process of designing badge systems.

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C or X MOOCs ? – Make Way for the Super-MOOC !

C or X MOOCs ? – Make Way for the Super-MOOC ! | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it

While basic topics such as the validity of various learning theories can be joyfully debated until the cows come home in a connectivist cMOOC, this seems less appropriate for the ‘hard’ sciences, such as physics and chemistry, where a knowledge of fundamental procedures and processes is essential for even basic comprehension, let alone expertise. Here, facts are, … well facts, and becoming familiar with them by slogging through the mathematics and other donkey work is likely to be more productive than protracted debate.

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Rhizomatic Learning and MOOCs - Assessment

Rhizomatic Learning and MOOCs - Assessment | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it

I received a question on twitter today about one of my favourite fist slamming on the table topics, assessment, and figured i would use the opportunity to put down a few thoughts about rhizomatic learning and how it impacts the way I see MOOCs.

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O brave new university, / That has such MOOCs in’t!

O brave new university, / That has such MOOCs in’t! | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it

The basic principle: the ultimate learner-centered environment

 

The most important thing to understand about Massive Open Online Courses is that they are massive and essentially uncontrollable by teachers. This is wonderful, as it hands control off to the vast majority of participants who are not teachers (n-1, precisely, or n-t).

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World Education University looks to ride the MOOC wave despite skeptics | Inside Higher Ed

World Education University looks to ride the MOOC wave despite skeptics | Inside Higher Ed | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it

As mayor of Rancho Mirage, Calif., Scott Hines is in charge of a town of about 17,000 people in the Coachella Valley. As the chief operating officer of World Education University, a new company that says it “will forever alter the landscape of post-secondary education” by offering free courses online, Hines is now in charge of the personal information of about 50,000 prospective students and more than $1 million in seed funding.

 

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MOOCs: Where are the Librarians? | HASTAC

MOOCs: Where are the Librarians? | HASTAC | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it

On August 3rd, I participated in a Twitter discussion with Hybrid Pedagogy and David Stavens of Udacity. I posed a question that seemed to create a bit of a stir. “Has anyone thought of embedding librarians into MOOCs?” Mr. Stavens replied that all of Udacity’s classes had a professional teaching team supporting them. I asked if a librarian was working with the instructor as a collaborator in teaching the class. I asked if classes had access to scholarly databases for research. The lack of a direct affirmation leads me to assume the answer is no. I find it hard to believe that in all of the MOOC furor no one is considering a crucial part of education: the research component, the librarian component.

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Zero pedagogy: A hyperbolic case for curation and creation over education in the age of the MOOC (#moocmooc)

Zero pedagogy: A hyperbolic case for curation and creation over education in the age of the MOOC (#moocmooc) | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it
The crazy argument for Zero pedagogy Pedagogy does not matter. It has always been a discipline aimed at making people learn something they don't particularly want to learn.
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Central Florida to Offer MOOC on Blended Online Learning

Central Florida to Offer MOOC on Blended Online Learning | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it

The University of Central Florida (UCF) announces the second offering of its popular MOOC (massive open online course) for blended learning faculty and designers: BlendKit2012. Based around the open-licensed BlendKit Course instructional materials, BlendKit2012 will run as a five-week cohort (from Monday, September 24 to Monday, October 29, 2012) facilitated by UCF’s Dr. Kelvin Thompson and Dr. Linda Futch. Course components include regular communications from facilitators, weekly readings, hands-on tasks, a variety of real time and asynchronous interaction opportunities, and weekly webinars with experienced blended learning instructors.

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Motivation in MOOC

Motivation in MOOC | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it
How to engage and motivate adult learners? Viplav asks: What skills do learners require to navigate these new learning environments? Does it require that they be motivated, socially enabled and hav...
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Getting ready for the online tsunami

Getting ready for the online tsunami | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it
New online teaching and learning consortia by North American universities have sparked a debate in the media. Their massive open online courses (MOOCs) are already drawing interest and registration from millions of students around the world.

 

At the heart of this debate are two fundamental questions. Should universities provide free teaching materials online, accessible by anyone with a computer and internet connection around the world? Is the quality of online education the same as that provided in the traditional classroom setting, and should the students who learn online be given course credit?

 

The first question is simpler to answer. For many of the universities involved, the cost is minimal to spread knowledge beyond their ivory towers. Most of the courses currently on offer are basic undergraduate content. In return, these universities can further affirm their market leading reputations and benefit from higher enrolments in fee-paying, advanced level courses down the road.

 

The second question, is more tricky. In order to better appreciate the underlying issues, I turn to findings from my research on service separation.

 

Even Sebastian Thrun of Udacity acknowledges that much of online learning is still experimental, and it is not clear if online learning can replace offline learning. Thus, on-campus learning still has its place.

The next issue is whether and how to formalise the arrangements for these online course offerings, including the award of course credits, and even degrees down the track. This is a thorny issue. With the lack of monitoring and formal assessment, it is difficult to ascertain if a student has indeed mastered the requisite knowledge or has had the work done by another.

 

As the MOOCs model is still in its infancy, getting to profitability is yet another consideration. For example, Coursera does not pay its university partners, nor vice versa. While Coursera has secured some initial financing, it is not clear how soon it can work out a sustainable business model before its funds run out.

 

Nonetheless, these changes foreshadow further changes in the tertiary education sector. While the trend setters are in the US, it is only a matter of time before its impact reaches Australia's shores.

 

Our universities need to prepare for a global tsunami in order to survive.

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UNCLE WIGGLY IN CONNECTIVISM: THE MOOC MOOC ENDS

UNCLE WIGGLY IN CONNECTIVISM: THE MOOC MOOC ENDS | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it

"I think I will also incorporate the word “connectivist” into my vocabulary, although I may not prove to be as rigorous or doctrinaire a Connectivist as some of the MOOC MOOC organizers. I like the term in its insistence on the idea that what knowledge and information exists by and for collaboration and that education is as much or more about connecting—people and ideas—as it is about, say, constructing understandings or the transmission of expert knowledge."


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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To MOOC or not to MOOC: A student's take on the growing trend | Coordination Régionale PACA

To MOOC or not to MOOC: A student's take on the growing trend | Coordination Régionale PACA | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it

Following is a blog post by Jordan Mills, UB’s editorial intern and a student at Central Connecticut State University. After reading an article in the Winston-Salem Journal regarding Wake Forest University (N.C.) not being ready to enter the world of free online courses, it got me wondering, is it worth the while for a college student to be enroll in this type of course?

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Cracking the Biggest Barrier in Online Education: Motivation

Cracking the Biggest Barrier in Online Education: Motivation | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it
This guy swore he'd learn to code this year. Ever try a massive open online education (MOOC) course from the likes of Udacity or Coursera?
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Online open education: yes, this is the game changer

Online open education: yes, this is the game changer | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it
Mass Open Online Courseware (MOOCs) is less than a year old but it is already clear this will be the game changer in higher education worldwide.
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6.003z: A Learner-Created MOOC Spins Out of MITx

6.003z: A Learner-Created MOOC Spins Out of MITx | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it

6.003z is the creation of Amol Bhave, a 17-year-old high school student from Jabalpur, India who was disappointed to learn that MITx had no plans to offer the follow-up class to 6.002x. Typically, the next class students take at MIT is 6.003, Signals and Systems. So Bhave took matters into his own hands, creating his own open online course with help from two other members of the 6.002 learning community – a class based on a blend of MIT OpenCourseWare and student-created materials.

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Students in Free Online Courses Form Groups to Study and Socialize - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Students in Free Online Courses Form Groups to Study and Socialize - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it

As enrollment has rapidly increased in free online classes, also known as Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOC’s, students are increasingly forming groups, both online and in the real world, to study and socialize.

 

Whether aiming to make the experience more personal or to learn more about the possibilities of free online education, the students are seeking out various ways to connect with classmates. Following are examples of some of those gatherings:

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Are They Learning Or Cheating? Online Teaching's Dilemma - Forbes

Are They Learning Or Cheating? Online Teaching's Dilemma - Forbes | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it

Online-teaching pioneers such as Coursera and Udacity are beaming top professors’ lessons into students’ homes worldwide, while slashing costs, getting rid of stuffy lecture halls and improving public access. But they’re having a harder time with one of teaching’s eternal headaches: stopping students’ cheating.

 

The Chronicle of Higher Education this week reported that Coursera’s online students have filed dozens of complaints about plagiarism by peers in humanities courses. Among the accusations: concern that an essay in the Fantasy and Science Fiction class was nothing more than a rehash of a Wikipedia entry.

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Saylor Foundation Makes Course Credit Agreement With Straighterline And Excelsior College | WiredAcademic

Saylor Foundation Makes Course Credit Agreement With Straighterline And Excelsior College | WiredAcademic | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it
The Saylor Foundation announced an important alliance with two other education companies - Excelsior College and Straighterline. Saylor is creating a set of free, online courses in a dozen typical subjects that undergraduates major in.
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Dozens of Plagiarism Incidents Are Reported in Coursera's Free Online Courses - Technology - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Dozens of Plagiarism Incidents Are Reported in Coursera's Free Online Courses - Technology - The Chronicle of Higher Education | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it

Students taking free online courses offered by the startup company Coursera have reported dozens of incidents of plagiarism, even though the courses bear no academic credit. This week a professor leading one of the so-called Massive Open Online Courses posted a plea to his 39,000 students to stop plagiarizing, and Coursera's leaders say they will review the issue and consider adding plagiarism-detection software in the future.

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Some reflections on MOOC

Some reflections on MOOC | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it
” Online education through MOOC could be feeding us with knowledge like steroids”  Is such claim a hyperbole?  May be, may be not. I found this post and the comments pretty fascinating,...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Three Kinds of MOOCs « Lisa's (Online) Teaching Blog

Three Kinds of MOOCs « Lisa's (Online) Teaching Blog | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it

We are so into MOOCs now that it’s too much for me. Gotta apply Ockham’s Razor 2.0 to this stuff.

 

At the Ed-Media conference, I attended a session by Sarah Schrire of Kibbutzim College of Education in Tel Aviv. In her discussion of Troubleshooting MOOCs, she noted the dificulties in determining her own direction in offering a MOOC in the “Stanford model” MOOCs versus the “connectivism” MOOCs. I found myself breaking it down into three categories instead.

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Affordances of MOOCs

Affordances of MOOCs | MOOCs, SPOCs and next generation Open Access Learning | Scoop.it

Siemens “in every mooc” frame is very different from the split others are writing about, between cMOOCs (which come from the Siemens-Downes-Groom “connectivist”/chaotic perspective) and xMOOCs (the big ones of Coursera, Udacity, etc., often organized explicitly around a technical/broadcast model). Siemens is not writing about the fundamental orientation of any individual MOOC (I suspect he’d at least be sympathetic to Marc Bousquet’s division of good and bad MOOCs) but rather the responses to the affordances of anything like a MOOC.

 

Affordance is an engineering-design term referring roughly to what a particular technology allows in terms of human action. In terms of a MOOC, Siemens observes how participants go off in different directions (not being choreographed by a teacher in the room), try to figure things out in subsets of the class, use social media in or out of an LMS to share media, leave, etc. All of these activities are made possible by certain technical features of online courses large enough to be called a MOOC. Those are not the only participant responses possible, but I am not surprised that there’s a certain subset of potential actions that become modal actions.

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