Martino's page on Philippine Insurrection
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Martino's page on Philippine Insurrection
A page describing the Philippine Insurrection during the Age of U.S. Imperialism
Curated by Martino Locke
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During the late 19th and early 20th, the U.S. expanded and became a world power. In the late 1800s, the U.S. came into Hawaii, first just to buy land and establish plantations, but then to take over. We did this by convincing the king of Hawaii at the time to modify their national constitution to only allow land-owning residents the right to vote, but the king soon died and his sister became queen. The plantation owners soon organized and overthrew the queen and called the marines to help keep the peace and Sanford B. Dole led the government. Later the United States took over the Philippines, Guam and Puerto Rico. With those three countries, they basically won them after winning the war with Spain. Most didn’t put up a fight, but the Philippines did, starting the Philippine Insurrection. At the same time, The United States also won Cuba. The United States kicked Spain out of Cuba and gave Cuba their independence, with limitations though. Another example of imperialism is what the U.S. did with Panama. First we give them their independence, but only to make a canal very cheap. Finally, there’s the example with China. The U.S. forced China to open up to trades after helping European nations defeat the Chinese in the boxer rebellion. In this short amount of time, the United States expanded to places unimaginable in the beginning of the country, some ways were ethical while others were not. But the U.S. did make progress nonetheless.

 

To gain more power and territory, the U.S. did many positive and negative actions. First, the positive of taking over Hawaii and soon making it a state is that the U.S. got money. The negative is that the Hawaiians lost all independence, which is never a good thing for anyone. Second, the positives for taking over the Philippines, Guam, and Puerto Rico are that the U.S. kicked out Spain after winning the Spanish-American War. The negative is that the U.S. took over them as well, which seemed liked those islands traded one master for another master. Third, the positives for taking over Cuba are the same as the one before: Spain was kicked out and they are given their independence. The negatives, though, are that the United States put limitations on their independence. Fourth, the positives for getting involved with Panama are that they get their independence from Colombia. The negative is that in the process of all this, the United States looked very greedy. Fifth, the positive for intervening with China was to get them to open up their docks for trade. The negative doesn’t really affect the United States, but really affects China because they lose their sovereignty. Although there were many positives, the U.S. shouldn’t intervene, because all these nations lost their independence in one way or another.

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Connection to Today #1 (Video)

Connection to Today #1 (Video) | Martino's page on Philippine Insurrection | Scoop.it
Let’s hope this isn’t just another bad Hollyweird attempt to be “relevant” about today’s issues by garbling history and imposing modern sensibilities on people that have been dead for a hundred years.
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Primary Document #2

This document describes the explorations by early navigators, descriptions of the islands and their peoples, their history and records of the Catholic missions, as related in contemporaneous books and manuscripts, showing the political, economic, commericial and religious conditions of those islands from their earliest relations with European nations to the beginning of the nineteenth century

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Historical Website #2

Army Navy Marine Air Force Coast Guard military and defense information and resources. Find old buddies apply for a VA Loan find a civilian job join the service read about Tricare World War 2 and thousands of other military related subjects.
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Vocabulary Section

1. Insurrection - a violent uprising against an authority or government. (Opposition to the new regime led to armed insurrection.)

 

2. Filipino - of or relating to the Philippines, the Filipinos, or their language. (Emilio Aguinaldo was the very first Filipino President in the Philippines.)

 

3. Imperialist - of, relating to, supporting, or practicing imperialism. (The United States had an imperialist mindset during this time period.)

 

4. Atrocity - an extremely wicked or cruel act, typically one involving physical violence or injury. (The Jewish Holocaust is an atrocity the world never wishes to see again.)

 

5. Famine - extreme scarcity of food. (Many places in Africa are in the middle of a famine.)

 

6. Populace - the people living in a particular country or area. (Japan sought to educate its colonial subjects for the purpose of improving productivity and not for cultivating a highly educated populace.)

 

7. Aspiration - a hope or ambition of achieving something. (My biggest aspiration is to go to the NBA.)

 

8. Emilio Aguinaldo – First Philippine Republic president. (Emilio Aguinaldo is considered one of the greatest men in Filipino history.)

 

9. Constabulary - an armed police force organized as a military unit. (The constabulary abused many people.)

 

10. Proclamation - a public or official announcement, especially one dealing with a matter of great importance. (The Emancipation Proclamation is the document that “made all slaves free.”)

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Historical Website #3

Historical Website #3 | Martino's page on Philippine Insurrection | Scoop.it
When the Spanish authorities in Manila yielded the capital of the Philippine Islands to American forces under Admiral George Dewey in August 1898, they knew the game was up and they much preferred to...
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Primary Document #3

Primary Document #3 | Martino's page on Philippine Insurrection | Scoop.it
The United States had its first experience with people who didn't appreciate being liberated when they took the Philippines from Spain and then faced a native revolt.
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Primary Document #1

Primary Document #1 | Martino's page on Philippine Insurrection | Scoop.it
Full text of Pres.Roosevelt's Proclamation Ending the Philippine 'Insurrection' -- Jul 4, 1902...
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Historical Website #1

Historical Website #1 | Martino's page on Philippine Insurrection | Scoop.it
A brief description of the war between the United States and the Philippines which began in 1899. Designed as a resource for students, researchers and history buffs.
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