Martin Luther King Jr. research paper
54 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by lou adamo
Scoop.it!

Infobase Learning - Login

The suspected assassin, James Earl Ray, a white supremacist who had escaped from prison a year earlier, eluded Memphis police but was arrested two months later in London, England. After extradition, Ray confessed, entered a guilty plea, and was sentenced to 99 years in prison. (A trial and conviction could have resulted in the death penalty.) However, Ray recanted his confession days later and spent the rest of his life working unsuccessfully with several lawyers to have his case heard in court. He died in prison of liver cancer in 1998.

 

Stern, Sheldon M. "Martin Luther King Jr., assassination of." In Campell, Ballard C., Ph.D., gen. ed. Disasters, Accidents, and Crises in American History. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2008. American History Online. Facts On File, Inc. http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?
ItemID=WE52&iPin=DACH0160&SingleRecord=True (accessed January 19, 2012).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by lou adamo
Scoop.it!

MLK "Dangerous Man"

A stirring orator and charismatic leader, King won the support of most black Americans, and many whites as well, but he was nonetheless often regarded with suspicion if not outright hatred, especially by southern whites who openly referred to him as "Martin Luther Coon." Attorney General Robert Kennedy agreed to secretly wiretap King's phone in 1963 because of King's association with alleged communists. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) director J. Edgar Hoover called King "the most dangerous man in America" and believed that the civil rights movement was controlled and financed by the Soviet Union. The FBI launched a covert campaign to destroy King by bugging his hotel rooms, taping alleged sexual encounters, and sending the tapes to Coretta Scott King in the hope that her husband would commit suicide or at least forego personally accepting the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize.

 

Stern, Sheldon M. "Martin Luther King Jr., assassination of." In Campell, Ballard C., Ph.D., gen. ed. Disasters, Accidents, and Crises in American History. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2008. American History Online. Facts On File, Inc. http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?
ItemID=WE52&iPin=DACH0160&SingleRecord=True (accessed January 19, 2012).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by lou adamo
Scoop.it!

MLK "Only trying to help"

Early in 1968, King went to Memphis, Tennessee, to help black sanitation workers achieve fair treatment and union recognition. On April 3, King spoke prophetically to his followers: "I've seen the promised land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know … [that] I'm not fearing any man. 'Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord.'" The next day, while standing on the balcony of the Lorainne Motel, the 39-year-old King was shot and killed by a sniper firing from a nearby rooming house. President Johnson feared that recent civil rights gains had been wiped out overnight; first lady Claudia "Lady Bird" Johnson described the news of King's death as "one of those frozen moments, as though the bomb had fallen on us." Violence erupted in more than 100 cities across the nation, eventually requiring 50,000 troops to restore order. In Washington, D.C., alone, many downtown buildings were torched, and there were 11 deaths, more than 1,200 injuries, and more than 7,600 arrests. As President Johnson watched the smoke rise over the nation's capital, he remarked that the city looked like a war zone. The civil rights movement never recovered its national cohesion, status, and influence.

 

Stern, Sheldon M. "Martin Luther King Jr., assassination of." In Campell, Ballard C., Ph.D., gen. ed. Disasters, Accidents, and Crises in American History. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2008. American History Online. Facts On File, Inc. http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?
ItemID=WE52&iPin=DACH0160&SingleRecord=True (accessed January 19, 2012).

more...
Khai Tran's curator insight, January 8, 2014 2:28 AM

Dr. King was a great leader and a very powerful man for what he stood up for. He overcame all the racism and hate by still giving a famous speech that millions listened to