How has marine biology helped us better understand our planet?
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End Captivity of Intelligent Marine Life

End Captivity of Intelligent Marine Life | How has marine biology helped us better understand our planet? | Scoop.it
Captive dolphins and whales have received a lot of sympathy lately in response to the unnatural living situations forced upon them. Urge the government to protect these creatures federally by demanding all be released and capture ceased.
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Surely many people have been to sea world and any place that has a show including a dolphin or a whale doing cool tricks. Sure they are entertaining and exciting to watch but they aren’t the nicest thing to do to those animals. In some states it is illegal to keep intelligent marine animals in captivity for human entertainment.  In other states people are fighting for this law to be passed. These animals are very intelligent and keeping them locked up for your own personal gain is something that people are trying to prevent. Some of these animals are endangered and keeping them locked up and forcing them to preform is not helping them in anyway.  Tom Vilsack is the head of Secretary of the Department of Agriculture and many people have taken the initiative of writing letters to him to stop this cruel act and to set these animals free.

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Study: New way to gauge marine mammal age

Study: New way to gauge marine mammal age | How has marine biology helped us better understand our planet? | Scoop.it
A new DNA technique, developed using data about the humpback whales off New England and Australia in a study Robbins contributed to, will allow scientists to pinpoint the age of the animals — and many others marine mammals.
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A new skin sampling technique is being used to find out the age of whales and many other marine lives. Marine biologists have already started using this new technique on whale in New Zealand and Australia. Knowing the age of whales is very important because it gives scientist an idea if their population is increasing or decreasing, especially in areas that have a decreasing number of whale population, and even the average life span of a whale. As is stands the number of humpback whales in the northern Atlantic region if around 11,500 but the number is soon to be changed in the near future. Thanks to this new method scientist have been able to find out that whales are able to live for 90 years and more. This new method is also much cheaper than tracking the whales, which has been a method that has been used for years. However this new method is much cheaper and reliable.

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What is Marine Biology? - MarineBio.org

What is Marine Biology? - MarineBio.org | How has marine biology helped us better understand our planet? | Scoop.it
What is Marine Biology? @ MarineBio.org
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This article talks about how Marine biology is a very important career.  It talks about how marine biology is one of the main reasons why we know so much about our planet; however we have only explored about 5% of our waters. It also talks about how marine biology is a whole list of jobs like Environmental marine biology which is the study of ocean health, Ichthyology which is the study of marine life in salt water and fresh water, and a famous one Marine mammology which is the study of whales and dolphins, these are only a couple of many jobs in this field. Marine biology is also studied in multiple ways such as through computers, satellites, fiber optics, and even as simple as nets to catch microscopic organisms. With the earth being 71% water and rising the possibilities for studying the ocean is endless.

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Nick Konig's comment, April 7, 2014 6:01 PM
I think marine biology is a very important job in the world. I think that it's really crazy that only 5% of the ocean has been discovered and just comes to show why marine biology is so important. I also thought how it was interesting how marine biology sections off into different jobs like environmental marine biology, ichthyology, and marine mammology. I also thought it was cool that there a many different way people study the ocean like with satellites, computers, fiber optics, and nets. I thought your examinations of marine biology were great and you'll be a great marine biologist!
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All the better to see you with, my dear! New fish discovered with upward looking eye

All the better to see you with, my dear! New fish discovered with upward looking eye | How has marine biology helped us better understand our planet? | Scoop.it
A fish with a previously unknown type of eye has been discovered by scientists. The aptly-named glasshead barreleye lives at depths of 800 to 1000 meters. It has a cylindrical eye pointing upwards to see prey, predators or potential mates silhouetted against the gloomy light above. But the eye also has a mirror-like second retina which can detect bioluminescent flashes created by deep-sea denizens to the sides and below, report researchers.
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The University of Tübingen's Institute of Anatomy has discovered a new fish that is unlike any other fish or animal that has ever been discovered. The glasshead barreleye lives in the depths of 800 to 1000 meters. It gets its name from its unique eyes. Its eyes are pointing up so he can see his prey. However this does not mean he is blind from below. His eyes also have a mirror-like second retina which can detect bioluminescent flashes created by deep-sea. The glasshead is only one of two vertebrates with reflector eyes, which means that those two are related, however took different paths and are in the same situation. These special eyes are usually only found in invertebrates like mollusks, and crustaceans, but the glasshead and the brownsnout spookfish are very special exceptions.

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Secret Santa Cruz fossil site reveals new whale species

Secret Santa Cruz fossil site reveals new whale species | How has marine biology helped us better understand our planet? | Scoop.it
Bobby Boessenecker dug up bones of dozens of ancient ocean creatures in Santa Cruz.
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After receiving a phone call from his uncle Boessenecker jumped on his car with friends and arrived at the beach only to fine hundreds of bones from different species of whales, sharks, dolphins, and even a water bird. One of the many fossils is a fossil of a whale that has never yet been identified. Boessenecker says that it existed about 3 million years ago and it is the distant ancestor of the minke and fin whales that live today. He found exactly 21 long-extinct marine mammals and one of them was even an ancestor of the extinct Yangtze River dolphin. In total he found four species of whales that have never been identified. Boessenecker also said "These marine mammals show that only a short time ago a vastly different cast of species swam off our shores, while the modern species evolved somewhere else,". Even with all these break troughs he is not even done uncovering all of the fossils that he found. 

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