Margaret Singer & Women's Contraception
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Margaret Sanger was born Margaret Higgins. She was born and raised in Corning, New York on September 14, 1879. Her mother, before she died at age 50 of tuberculosis and cervical cancer had 18 pregnancies. Both of Margaret’s parents were Catholics who later became atheist and activist of women’s suffrage and free public education. Sangers father was originally from Ireland, but because of the potato famish he immigrated to Canada. He signed up for the U.S Army at age fourteen, but had to wait until he was 15 to serve. Her father studied medicine and phrenology but ultimately wanted to become a stonecutter, making stone angels, saints, and tombstones. Sixth of the eleven children, Margaret spent most of her child hood taking care of her brothers and sisters and doing her chores. Sanger attended Claverack College in Claverack, New York for two years. In 1896, her father asked that she come back home to nurse her mother who was very ill. Her mother died three years later in 1899. One of Margaret’s friends mother arranged for Margaret to enroll in a nursing program at a hospital in the New York suburbs. In 1902, she married William Sanger, but they later became estranged in 1913. The divorce wasn’t finalized until 1921. After a fire destroyed their home in 1912, the Sanger family moved back to New York City. The Birth Control Movement all began in 1911 when Sanger wrote a series of articles about sexual education entitled “ What Every Mother Should Know “ and “What Every Girl Should Know” for a socialist magazine. After working with poor women who were suffering due to frequent childbirth and self-induced abortions, she set out to look for something to help these women. After hearing one of the women she has been helping with has died after yet another self-inducing abortion, Sanger devoted her life to help women before they take the risk of doing dangerous and illegal abortions. In 1914, Margaret launched an eight-page monthly newsletter which promoted contraception, entitled The Women Rebel. October 1915, Sangers husband distributed a copy of Family Limitation, resulting in 30-day jail sentence. With the help of the public pressure, the government dropped the chargers in early 1916. After the visit at a Dutch birth clinic in 1915, Margaret was convinced that diaphragms were more effective means of contraception. She started publishing the monthly periodical The Birth Control Review in 1917. Nine days after opening a family planning and birth control clinic in the Brownsville neighborhood, she was arrested for breaking a New York state law. She was offered a lenient sentence only if she would not break another law, but she still said she would not respect a law that exist today, she was sentenced 30 days in a workhouse. In 1921, to enlarge the base of supporters to include the middle class she founded the American Birth Control League.

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contraception

Birth Control...

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Birth Control - Chicago Tribune

Birth Control News.Find breaking news, commentary, and archival information about Birth Control From The Chicago Tribune...
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Margaret Sanger, Founder of Planned Parenthood, In Her Own Words

Margaret Sanger, Founder of Planned Parenthood, In Her Own Words | Margaret Singer & Women's Contraception | Scoop.it
A collection of quotes by Margaret Sanger, founder of Planned Parenthood, taken from her many writings.
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CDC - Contraception - Reproductive Health

CDC - Contraception - Reproductive Health | Margaret Singer & Women's Contraception | Scoop.it

 

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Birth control

Birth control | Margaret Singer & Women's Contraception | Scoop.it
Birth control is a regimen of one or more actions, devices, or medications followed in order to deliberately prevent or reduce the likelihood of a woman giving birth or becoming pregnant.
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