Management and care of features, sites, places and environments
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Recycling - Living in Germany

Recycling - Living in Germany | Management and care of features, sites, places and environments | Scoop.it
Mitchell McCarthy's insight:

Outline:

This web link outlines the waste management system of Germany and can be utilized as a digital resource to aid in the comparative judgment of the differences between Germany and Australia's waste management systems. 

 

How to use it in a classroom:

To use this resource to complement a class  on the environment strand of the HSIE stage 2 syllabus the teacher would begin the lesson by asking the students to start thinking of how we manage our waste in Australia. Ask them to evaluate our current waste management plan and consider if this is a sustainable feature of Australian society.  They can also include ideas on how to improve Australia’s waste management system. These two questions should be written down on paper, preferably in a mind map form, so as to provide a indicator of progress after the task. Predictably this will not produce much discussion as it is a complicated question to ask. However it does provide a base line example of their understanding of waste management and allow new ideas that emerge to be assessed after the task. 

 

This resource can be used as an identifier of the waste management system in Germany and juxtaposed against the Australian waste management system to apply a global perspective on how different countries are contributing to making our future methods of waste management more sustainable. For instance attention should be drawn to the fact that Australia mainly operates on a two bin system, being recycling and general waste, while Germany operates on a 5 bin system, splitting waste up into Restmuell (anything that cannot be recycled), Recyclables, Paper, Compost and Glass as identified by this digital resource. When students acknowledge the vast differences between our two countries waste management systems they should return to their original mind maps and look to apply some of the ideas found in this resource. The use of this resource is aimed at encouraging consideration in regards to how Australia cares for it's environment through waste management systems. 

 

Assessment content:

This resource enables students to engage with a particular content indicator of the environments strand as throughout the task outline above, they will be evaluating management plans and examine possible strategies for alternative plans for key features or sites in Australia. Their reactions and responses to examining Germany's waste management system will identify whether they have considered the differences between their initial evaluation of Australia's waste management system and their exposure to Germany's system and whether they have been able to create possible strategies for alternative waste management systems in Australia

 

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The Tragedy of the Commons Explained - YouTube

The Tragedy of the commons can partially describe why people don't work together and conserve certain resources. If nobody owns the resource and everyone is ...
Mitchell McCarthy's insight:

This video should be viewed after the following class activity to help students consolidate their learning through a different medium.

 

Teaching idea:

Begin the class by splitting the class up into separate groups of four. Identify a common resource and say that it will be represented through the use of lollies or some other desirable object for children, coins, tazos, etc. For instance you can say that each lolly represents one pig on a farm. Begin the game by giving each group 8 lollies, 2 for each child. Inform the children that every lolly left over after the round will reproduce another lolly for the next round. The theory behind this is that if all children only eat one lolly each then the game can continue on in a sustained and viable way. However if a child decides to eat more than their fair share, the amount of lollies in that group will be lessened for the next round.

 

For the first round, have all the children close their eyes bar one who is to extract a lolly and eat it. Play one complete round of this and ask the children to count how many lollies they have left in their group. For the second round you tell the children that if they want to take a second lolly they are allowed to but be aware this will leave the group without the same amount of lollies for the next round. Some students should take more than one and hence decrease the value of their group. Play rounds like this until a group no longer has any lollies.

 

The activity may confuse students at first but after showing this video on the tragedy of the commons, teachers can open up discussion about how taking more than your fair share negatively effects the resources in that area. This is an activity that focuses on resource management and the care needed in creating laws regarding resource extraction.

 

Assessment task:

Using the knowledge they have gathered from the classroom activity combined with the digital resource, the following assessment task can be applied. Students will be asked to form small groups and begin identifying possible conflicts in management and care of environments. They can be asked questions such as 'what stops people from taking only what they need?'. The class task and digital resource should help students recognize what creates potential conflicts in resource management, such as the understanding that people want more than they should have, and that this stands in the way of sustainable living. 

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Save Paper to Save Forests - YouTube

Minus One Project - a green initiative by Samsung Printers to save trees and our forests. It takes a small step like reducing the font size by 1 before print...
Mitchell McCarthy's insight:

Outline:

This video provides children with a simplistic understanding of how everyday behaviours can have a great influence on the larger environment. It establishes a connection between personal behaviour and how this contributes to the management and care of the environment. By presenting statistics on the amount of trees we lose just from printing paper each year children are able to see how we affect our environment, and by presenting how many trees we would save each year but going down one size in font children are able to observe how personal actions can affect the environment on a grander scale.

 

Teaching idea:

A potential teaching exercise from this perspective could include screening this video and encouraging discussion around deforestation in Australia. The discussion should be led towards ways in which personal behaviour can be used to help manage and care for environmental resources. A class activity could then be splitting the class up into groups of four and asking each group to think of a way we could all change our personal behaviour to benefit the environment and aid in the management of environmental resources. Each group will present their ideas to the class and concerns and queries about these ideas can be addressed in a group discussion. 

 

This resource can aid students in formulating action care plans for features and sites in their environment and community. This perspective aligns with the teaching aims for the environment strand of the HSIE syllabus

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Muru Mittigar Aboriginal Cultural and Education Centre

Muru Mittigar Aboriginal Cultural and Education Centre | Management and care of features, sites, places and environments | Scoop.it
Muru Mittigar Aboriginal Cultural & Education Centre provides a wide range of services to support local Darug people and the wider Aboriginal community. Read more...
Mitchell McCarthy's insight:

Outline:

Muru Mittigar is an local Aboriginal cultural and educational center for the Penrith region which offers cultural tours and activities for groups so as to increase involvement and awareness of existing Aboriginal cultural practices. These activates include, but are not limited to, cultural talks, which provide the opportunity to share the Aboriginal stories of the land and their relationship to mother earth and Lore, bush tucker, boomerang workshops and aboriginal art. These activities provide a cultural medium in which students may learn about the local Aboriginal communities in their area and the relationship these communities have had with the land they have occupied since before white settlement. This center was established to preserve the Darug heritage and to allow the greater community to celebrate the life and culture of the Darug people. Students will be exposed to the Darug people and to how they have occupied this land for thousands of years and multiple generations, using the lands resources to fish and gather plant foods.

 

Assessment content:

This perspective on conservation and preservation will link in with ideas regarding managements of sites and places that the students will learn about in stage 2. The management and care for continuation of Aboriginal traditions at this site provides an aboriginal perspective on the importance of continuing this tradition so the community can continue to benefit from cultural sites such as Muru Mittigar. This resource also fulfills the requirement that teachers contact a local Aboriginal group, Aboriginal Land Council or field studies center to find out about Aboriginal land management practices

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Garden & Site - Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest

Garden & Site - Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest | Management and care of features, sites, places and environments | Scoop.it
Enjoy art, beautiful heritage buildings and gardens and great coffee at the weekend café.
Mitchell McCarthy's insight:

Penrith Regional Gallery is a key cultural site and was once home to modernist artists Margo and Gerald Lewers. This property was donated to Penrith City Council as an area for creative activity in the 1980s and became Penrith Regional Gallery and the Lewers Bequest. The garden played a key role in inspiring both of the Lewers work along with the guests they had over and its management and care since it was bequeathed has allowed it to remain a local cultural site and attraction for the Penrith region.

 

This site is now a functioning regional art gallery along with an extremely popular local café, Cafe at Lewers, thanks to the management of previous owners along with Penrith City Council. Cafe at Lewers use produce grown in the Lewers garden, just as the Lewers themselves did. This continuation of the tradition of correct management and care of this property has seen it maintain its cultural status in the region and allow a continuation of experiences within this property.

 

The galleries gardens remain under strict heritage laws which prohibit change to the stylistic nature of the garden along with the promise of commitment to maintaining the original plants throughout the seasons. This management plan can identify to stage 2 children how the management and care of a local site benefits the local community. 

 

Assessment task:

Once students have engaged with an example of how maintaining and caring for a local cultural site can greatly benefit the local community, they can begin to consider other sites in their local region that follow this same method. Ask students to discover and create a minute long speech on a local site that exists because of the management and care of the community. This will expand their thinking so that they can now consider how local cultural sites exist and the importance of continuing the tradition of their management and care. 

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