Making Math Meaningful & Learners Taking Charge of Their Learning
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Rescooped by Julia Lyles from Students Taking Charge of Learning
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9 Strategies for Motivating Students in Mathematics

9 Strategies for Motivating Students in Mathematics | Making Math Meaningful & Learners Taking Charge of Their Learning | Scoop.it
Motivating students to be (enthusiastically) receptive is one of the most important aspects of mathematics instruction and a critical aspect of the Common Core State Standards. Effective teachers sho

Via Rebecca Siegel, Heather Wehrle
Julia Lyles's insight:

Growing up I always struggled with math and never had any motivation to do it. Now that I am interning in a classroom I realize how important it is to motivate students to reach their full potential even in a subject they may not feel very confident in. I can motivate them in a number of ways including challenging them and building on their achievement. I never want my students to feel as though they can't do math. I want to give them a variety of strategies to motivate them and encourage their learning.

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Heather Wehrle's curator insight, December 12, 2013 9:06 AM

This article brings to light many ways in which we can help our students become more competent in math and gain ownership over their ideas.  Instead of teaching every detail, the author shows how the teacher can set up situations in which they can guide students to draw their own conclusions.  The role of the teacher as a facilitator and coach allows students to take charge of their own learning.  While it is difficult at first to strike this balance from a teaching standpoint, it is important that we learn to place learners in a spot where they are motivated by self-efficacy and their ability to generate ideas and conclusions.  Extrinsic awards are fine in most situations, but ultimately we want our students to have an intrinsic desire to do well in school.  This can come from giving them confidence and guiding them in their learning process.

 

Some of the strategies listed in the article are things that I have seen happen in my own classroom.  During math, we like to present our students with challenges that allow them to seek patterns.  I have seen the shift in motivation for my students when we place their learning in relevant and interesting contexts, which also illustrate the usefulness of the math to them.  We also do a great deal of "recreational mathematics", where students play games and solve puzzles to show how math can be fun.  If we can get our students motivated to learn and perform in math, they will be more willing to explore, take risks, and claim ownership over their own learning.

Jennifer Callaway's curator insight, December 13, 2013 4:31 PM

These strategies are things that I've been witnessing my math methods teacher use all semester. In my classroom I'm trying to be more aware of the questions I'm asking and the language I'm using. Again, going back to creating a community of learners - presenting students with a challenge and having them find a pattern and using justifications with partners/groups promotes student engagement, interest, and discussion. This article has great suggestions for how I can go about doing these things in my classroom.

Michelle Jin's curator insight, December 15, 2013 3:42 PM
This article offers some great ideas in how to get students to fall in love with studying math. Not only did it list 9 innovative (but doable!) strategies to motivate my math students, it also harps on how teachers need to be able to choose wisely from this list to adjust to the specific motivations that are already present in my learners. I think it's easy to read this article and think that each of these strategies would be equally successful in any classroom; however, I'm reminded that knowing your students is the most effective strategy in motivating them. By doing that, you're able to know what engages them and what doesn't interest them as much. Although the author of this article did not write "knowing your students" as part of his 9 strategies, I was able to take away that important, and more implicit message that would help me to use the rest of his techniques more effectively. Another reason why I appreciated reading this article is that many of the strategies listed involve student discovery and initiative. For example, strategy #9 suggests teachers to "get students actively involved in justifying mathematical curiosities." Other strategies suggested were presenting students with a challenge that is within reach, discovering a pattern, or calling attention to a void in knowledge. All of these techniques are much less teacher-dependent, but put the learning responsibility on the students! As I have observed much from my own past experiences and my current student teaching internship, students seem to be able to learn and retain information much more when they themselves are the "doers" in the classroom, not just receivers of information.
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Making the Flip Work in an Elementary Classroom

Making the Flip Work in an Elementary Classroom | Making Math Meaningful & Learners Taking Charge of Their Learning | Scoop.it
By Delia Bush In the past few weeks I've had the opportunity to talk to a few groups about my flipped classroom.  First, I spoke at our "Fired Up" conference, which is a conference for all the...
Julia Lyles's insight:

This year I was introduced to the idea of a flipped classroom. I think that this is a great idea if your students have the resources available to them. My students were given chromebooks this year to use in the classroom. They love using technology and I think the idea of the flipped classroom would be a great tool for students to take control of their learning. This also allows them to go at their own pace so they don't feel as though they are too far behind and give up or too far ahead and get bored. This is a great example of a flipped classroom!

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Laura Jane's curator insight, December 16, 2013 2:10 PM

Thanks Julia for this great flipped classroom idea! My placement school just got a class set of iPads, and I think that a flipped classroom activity would be a great way of integrating technology with learning. My mentor teacher doesn't usually teach math in any non-traditional ways, so I believe my students would see the flipped classroom model as a new and exciting way to learn. This article offers many ideas for implementing the flipped classroom, focusing largely on student-centered learning. Maybe I'll try this in my full takeover!

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10 ways to encourage students to take responsibility for their learning…

10 ways to encourage students to take responsibility for their learning… | Making Math Meaningful & Learners Taking Charge of Their Learning | Scoop.it
1. Don't make all the decisions Allow choice. Encourage students to make decisions about how they learn best. Create opportunities for them to pursue their own interests and practise skills in a va...
Julia Lyles's insight:

Something I have been working on throughout the semester is figuring out ways for students to take responsibility for their learning. This is somehting my mentor teacher stressed to me at the beginning of the year. We have planned lessons that give students choices, open ended questions and goal setting. As I go into the second semester I will continue to grow and learn how to encourage my students to take more responsibility for their learning especially in subjects such as math where I have many students who dislike the subject or think it is too hard. By making them responsible it will give them another way to view math and hopefully engage them and promote learning.

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Kimberly Wynkoop's curator insight, January 26, 2014 9:34 PM

The students in my placement struggle with taking on responsibilty of their own learning.  I think if we woul dmake a shift to classroom modeled with more of these ideas our students would be more sucessful.  As of now it is the teachers responsibility to make the students feel that they need to learn.  This will never work for some students but without making the changes in the classroom it is going to be a very hard transition of responsibilty.  

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Are You Tapping into Prior Knowledge Often Enough in Your Classroom?

Are You Tapping into Prior Knowledge Often Enough in Your Classroom? | Making Math Meaningful & Learners Taking Charge of Their Learning | Scoop.it
Learning progresses primarily from prior knowledge, and only secondarily from the materials we present to students, studies show. Think about that.
Julia Lyles's insight:
One way I can make math more meaningful for my students is through tapping into their prior knowledge. This is something I have learned a lot about this semester. Students build new knowledge from what they already know. This website gives examples of ways to tap into students prior knowledge and construct new knowledge. If students can relate the material to what they already know then the math becomes more meaningful and interesting to them which is the ultimate goal as a teacher!
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Rescooped by Julia Lyles from Making Mathematics Accessible and Meaningful
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Teaching secrets: Making math meaningful for all | CTQ


Via Esther Kang
Julia Lyles's insight:

This article talks about the different ways to make math meaningful to all of your students. One thing I liked was the use of white boards. In my classroom we dont have enough white boards for the whole class but we allow students to use dry erase markers and write on their desks. Students LOVE doing this and are eager to pay attention and try to figure out the problem. I also like the use of real life examples in the problems. Every math lesson I taught this semester I tried to make it relevant for the students by creating problems that talked about something they were interested in or related to them. I also had students teach concepts to each other throughout the semester in small groups and whole groups. Students enjoy this task because they like to get up in front of the class and present as individuals and in groups.

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Esther Kang's curator insight, December 12, 2013 7:43 PM

Creating real-life examples for the concepts that the student is learning seems to be the overarching theme for making math meaningful for all students.  We know as students ourselves that if we could not personally connect with the concepts learned in school, we often took the tests, quizzes, and exams and tended to forget the knowledge that we had "obtained".  This article introduces many methods to make math meaningful for all students.  One of the methods that stood out to me on top of creating real-life examples is teaching the students the power of "is your answer logical?"  This gets students to think about their own thinking processes.  When students are able to think critically about their methods of solving a problem, they will be able to dig deeply into a real understanding of that math.  

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Beyond the Book Expert Opinions: Manipulatives Make Math Meaningful

Beyond the Book Expert Opinions: Manipulatives Make Math Meaningful | Making Math Meaningful & Learners Taking Charge of Their Learning | Scoop.it
An online forum for education leaders nationwide, dedicated to helping every child learn and every school succeed.

Via Esther Kang
Julia Lyles's insight:

Throughout the semester I have realized how important it is to give students manipulatives to work with in math class.  This article discusses how to solve a real-life problem  just by using manipulatives.  Students with different learning styles can benefit greatly from using manipulatives rather than just completing a worksheet. It is engaging and allows students to easily explore different ways to figure out a problem. 

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Esther Kang's curator insight, December 12, 2013 4:36 PM

As a former math student myself, I find myself in a struggle when I am faced with a real-life problem that I cannot solve without the formula I have been taught to use.   I think as students, we have gotten too comfortable using formulas to solve problems and not have been taught any background information on how that formula has been developed.  This article discusses how adults were able to solve a real-life problem without using any formulas, just by using manipulatives.  I have realized the importance of manipulatives during my student teaching this semester.  Students with different learning styles can benefit greatly from using manipulatives.  

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Math Toolbox: make and use a math toolbox at home

Make math manipulatives to use at home
Julia Lyles's insight:

This is a great website to use to use manipulatives for any lessons. You can make manipulatives out of anything and they are very useful for any math lesson! This allows students to explore concepts and take charge of their own learning.

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How Students Can Take Charge of Their Education

How Students Can Take Charge of Their Education | Making Math Meaningful & Learners Taking Charge of Their Learning | Scoop.it
A guest post by the 19-year-old entrepreneur Dale J. Stephens, founder of UnCollege.org, on how anyone can “hack” his or her education.
Julia Lyles's insight:

This is a great insight into why it is important to have students take charge of their education. It is also something I can relate to as a learner. 

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Teaching Math with Picture Books, Part 2 | Scholastic.com

Teaching Math with Picture Books, Part 2 | Scholastic.com | Making Math Meaningful & Learners Taking Charge of Their Learning | Scoop.it
Here's my hard-to-pare list of effective, clever, and just-plain-fun math picture books. I’m going to share some of my more unusual favorites with you. Which picture books do you like to use to teach math?

Via Laura Williams
Julia Lyles's insight:

Pairing math and reading is a great way to engage students and integrate two subjects. It makes math meaningful to students and gives them another way to look at the subject. For those students who are intimidated by math it can help them to feel more comfortable with it. With the common core it is important to intergrate subjects. As a future teacher I am constantly looking for ways to do this and this is a great way!

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Laura Williams's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:08 AM

We can integrate story books with math! Here are several books that make math connections, and can be used to make math class interesting. A great way to engage students is to use stories that they enjoy, or stories that they may not have read yet. 

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Real World Math Problems

Real World Math Problems | Making Math Meaningful & Learners Taking Charge of Their Learning | Scoop.it
Mathalicious lessons teach standards-based math through real-world topics that students care about. (Anyone subscribe to http://t.co/zSEfgfeu7T? Is it worth the $?
Julia Lyles's insight:

This is a great resource for teachers to make math relevant to student's lives. It is no secret that many students dislike math class and hate doing math homework because they think it is boring or too hard. It is important to make math relevant to students lives giving them the opportunity to figure out a real life problem and making the math authentic. Students that are not interested in the topic means that the content they are learning is not interesting or engaging to them. As a teacher it is very satisfying to know you have reached all of your students. By coming up with creative ways to teach them how math is actually used in the real world it is rare that students will not become involved. This also helps with classroom management in the classroom by focusing students attention on something they are interested in.

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Rescooped by Julia Lyles from Making Mathematics Accessible and Meaningful & Alleviating Math Anxiety
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The Causes and Prevention of Math Anxiety

A great article by noted author Marilyn Curtain-Phillips on the causes and prevention of math anxiety.

Via Laura Jane
Julia Lyles's insight:

I have always had math anxiety so as a future teacher I think it is important to find ways to help my students so I can help them avoid math anxiety. Students have different learning styles and by finding different ways to teach math to each student it will get rid of some of the stress that comes along with learning math. It is very important to reach every student and the use on manipulatives and hands on learning to reach every learning style. 

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Laura Jane's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:20 PM

As someone who has always felt comfortable with math, this article offered great insight as to how and why students suffer with math anxiety. This article stresses the importance of nipping math anxiety in the primary grades, as it only gets worse as students get older. One approach mentioned that I really liked was the importance of paying attention to the classroom environment as a whole. If your students feel comfortable in their learning community, as if they won't be shamed if they get a wrong answer, they are more likely to feel at ease and open minded as they enter into unchartered territory (fractions anyone?)

 

One suggestion that the article mentioned that I plan to implement in my own classroom is to incorporate "relatable things." By using cartoons, humor, and picture in your math instruction, you can help your students to make connections with things that seem less intimidating. By encouraging them to make that connection, you can alleviate some of the anxiety associated with math struggles.

 

Something mentioned in the article that I already see in my classrom is putting students into cooperative pairs. We frequently encourage my students to "think-pair-share" with each other. This is a very real world approach, which is why I think it works so well. Although college students certainly dread doing group work, it is what we will be expected to do in the work force. Very rarely is a singular person expected to master a task completely independently. By allowing students to use resources around them, in this case other students, we are allowing them to participate in a deeper and more authentic learning experience.

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Making Math Meaningful with Online Games and Videos

Making Math Meaningful with Online Games and Videos | Making Math Meaningful & Learners Taking Charge of Their Learning | Scoop.it
By Almetria Vaba Math can be made meaningful when connected to students’ experiences. With video clips and interactive games from public media students pra

Via Mrs. Nardone
Julia Lyles's insight:

This website has great interactive games that allow students to use math in an authentic context such as baking or building a house. It allows students to use math and has them use their skills to complete a task that is an authentic use of math. I think this is important because it allows students to see the use of math in the real world and helps them understand why the skills they are learning are important. My students love interactive games and this would be a great way to encourage their learning and exploration into what they want to do in their future and how they can apply what they are learning.

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