Making a difference in the World
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Disk Detective: We need your help to discover the birthplace of Planets in never-before seen data!

Disk Detective: We need your help to discover the birthplace of Planets in never-before seen data! | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it

We need your help to discover the birthplace of Planets in never-before seen data! WISE is a NASA mission surveying the whole sky in infrared. This project is looking at stars to find dusty debris disks, similar to our asteroid field. These disks suggest that these stars are in the early stages of forming planetary systems. Learning more about these stars can tell us how our Solar System formed.

Computers often confuse debris disks around stars with other astronomical objects. We need your help to sort out what stars actually have these disks from Galaxies and Nebulae.

ou can learn more about the project on the Aboutand Science pages. Or you can get to classifying.

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Ric O' Barry's Dolphin Project: Taiji Live

Dolphin Project Live Stream @ Ustream.TV: Follow Ric O'Barry as he travels the world to end dolphin exploitation and slaughter.. World News
Odin Prometheus's insight:

Earth science, Natural science & Zoology student
Odin Prometheus: Earth Science Institute World.

 

#Orca Avenger & #Cove Guardian Odin Prometheus thanks:

Ric O'Barry's Dolphin Project's 

 

 

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If SeaWorld Is About Educating the Public, Why Doesn’t It Have Any Porpoises?

If SeaWorld Is About Educating the Public, Why Doesn’t It Have Any Porpoises? | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it
The absent species reveals much about aquatic theme parks’ real purpose (sorry).

 

Marine mammal “theme parks” often boast that educating the public about whales and dolphins is just as important to their core mission as entertaining people. But when it comes to acquiring animals, it seems that some marine species are more equal than others.

Consider the lowly porpoise, whose name originates from the Latin for “pig fish.” Thousands of cetaceans are held in captivity around the world. But the vast majority are bottlenose dolphins, followed by other members of the dolphin family, including common dolphins, pilot whales, false killer whales, and orcas. Only a handful are porpoises.

Why so few members of this dolphin relative? SeaWorld spokesman Fred Jacobs did not return an email asking why the company counts zero porpoises among its vast collection, but then, he’s not one of my biggest fans. The question was especially pertinent because harbor porpoises can be found off the coasts of California, Florida, and Texas, where SeaWorld operates. Shouldn’t visitors be learning about local species?

 

Critics say the industry generally considers porpoises undesirable because they don’t draw crowds in the same magnitude as killer whales or the iconic bottlenose dolphins popularized by the TV series Flipper.

Perhaps even more important, critics contend, porpoises are just not well suited to show business.

“It could be that their ‘crowd-appeal’ or lack thereof, has discouraged facilities from trying to display porpoises,” Courtney Vail, campaigns and programs manager at Whale and Dolphin Conservation, wrote in an email. “Facilities only have room for so many individuals, and it is the more common bottlenose that is the favored species for captive display.”

Naomi Rose, marine mammal scientist at Animal Welfare Institute, noted another reason. “They are ‘shy’ and less acrobatic—that’s probably the main reason they aren’t frequently held,” she wrote in an email.

Perhaps most significant, porpoises “can’t be trained to do much in the way of shows, and that’s what people come to see,” wrote Rose.

Historically, captive porpoises have not survived for long, but that may be because many were acquired through rescues or strandings—they were already sick, aging, or injured before being put in a tank.

But the survival argument is no longer valid; the Dolfinarium Harderwijk in the Netherlands has shown that porpoises can be maintained in captivity. It houses six harbor porpoises; three were rescued more than seven years ago, and one was rescued in 2011. The other two wereborn at the facility in 2012.

But there are no backflips, no porpoise-riding trainers, and no loud music. “Curious about what porpoises look like? Come soon and take a look,” the facility’s website suggests.

In Denmark, Fjord & Bælt, which describes itself as “a combined research and experience center that communicates knowledge about marine life in the waters of Denmark,” invites patrons to “observe our daily routines of training and feeding our three porpoises.”

Education, conservation, and research are major components of the park’s activities. “We intend to preserve and protect—through research and information—the only member of the whale species to breed in Danish waters,” the website says.

One porpoise, Freja, is estimated to be about 19 and has been in captivity for 17 years. Eigil, also in captivity for 17 years, has been trained for and taken part in “quite a few research projects, including studies of porpoises’ ability to identify fishing nets,” according to the website. The third porpoise, Sif, was rescued in 2004 and is now about 11.

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Pacific islander fights to be world’s first climate refugee.

Pacific islander fights to be world’s first climate refugee. | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it

A man from one of the lowest-lying nations on Earth is trying to convince New Zealand judges that he’s a refugee – suffering not from persecution, but from climate change.

The 37-year-old and his wife left his remote atoll in the Pacific nation of Kiribati six years ago for higher ground and better prospects in New Zealand, where their three children were born. Immigration authorities have twice rejected his argument that rising sea levels make it too dangerous for him and his family to return to Kiribati.

So, on 16 October, the man’s lawyer, Michael Kidd, will argue the case before New Zealand’s High Court. Mr Kidd, who specialises in human rights cases, said he will appeal all the way to the Supreme Court if necessary.

Legal experts consider the case a long shot, but it will be closely watched, and might have implications for residents in many low-lying islands. Kiribati, an impoverished string of 33 coral atolls about halfway between Hawaii and Australia, has about 103,000 people and has been identified by scientists as among the nations most vulnerable to climate change.

In a transcript of the immigration case obtained by the Associated Press, the Kiribati man describes extreme high tides, known as king tides, that he says have started to regularly breach Kiribati’s defences – killing crops, flooding homes and sickening residents. New Zealand immigration laws prevent him being named.

The man said that, around 1998, king tides began regularly breaching the sea walls around his village, which was overcrowded and had no sewerage system. He said fouled drinking water would make people vomit, and that there was no higher ground for villagers to escape to.

He said returning to the island would endanger the lives of his two youngest children.

“There’s no future for us when we go back to Kiribati,” he told the tribunal, according to the transcript. “Especially for my children. There’s nothing for us there.”

The man’s lawyer said the family is currently living and working on a New Zealand farm.

Last week, an international panel of climate scientists issued a report saying that it was “extremely likely” that human activity was causing global warming, and predicted that oceans could rise by as much as one metre by the end of the century. If that were to happen, much of Kiribati would simply disappear.

Though that is a dire prospect, New Zealand’s Immigration and Protection Tribunal has said it is not addressed by laws dealing with refugees.

In a decision recently made public, tribunal member Bruce Burson said the legal concept of a refugee is someone who is being persecuted, which requires human interaction. He said the tribunal rejected the man’s claim because nobody is persecuting him.

The tribunal found there was no evidence that the environmental conditions on Kiribati were so bad that the man and his family would face imminent danger should they return.

Burson said the man’s claim was also rejected because the family’s predicament was no different than that faced by the wider population of Kiribati.

AP

  

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Plastic Bank: Harvesting Waste Plastic to Reduce Poverty Through 3D Re-purpose Center for Social Plastic & Ocean Bound Plastic.

Plastic Bank: Harvesting Waste Plastic to Reduce Poverty Through 3D Re-purpose Center for Social Plastic & Ocean Bound Plastic. | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it

The Plastic Bank is setting up plastic repurposing centers around the world, where there’s an abundance of both waste plastic and poverty. 

We are empowering people to harvest plastics as a currency they can exchange for tools, household items, parts & 3D printing. 

Our mission is to remove plastic waste from the land, oceans and waterways while helping people ascend from poverty and transition into entrepreneurship.


We call harvesting and repurposing plastics like this “Social Plastic”. 

Our goal is to lead the movement towards worldwide demand for the use of Social Plastic in everyday products. The higher the worldwide demand becomes, the higher the reward will be for harvesting Social Plastic. 

Join our social plastic movement to start changing the world through your purchasing power.


The Plastic Bank is an organization designed to remove plastic waste from the worlds oceans, beaches and waterways while simultaneously empowering people living in poverty to raise their standard of living.

Our goal is to establish ‘Plastic Banks” strategically located in impoverished areas with an existing abundance of plastic waste. The Plastic Bank will offer people both education and the opportunity to exchange recyclable plastics for credits that can be used for the printing of 3D products, repurposed necessities and/or micro-finance loans.

A major focus will be on educating and empowering local people to reveal the value in themselves and to see the value in transforming repurposeable plastics into necessities and entrepreneurial opportunities. Additional efforts will go towards community collection projects that raise the overall standard of living in host communities.


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Fractal Sciences Inc.

Fractal Sciences Inc. | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it

McKinsey revealed that companies which put data at the center 
of sales and marketing decisions improve their marketing ROI by up to 20%.
Research also found that only 29% of campaigns consistently used any sort of analytics.

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Mission: Save The Ocean

Mission: Save The Ocean | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it
Mission: Save The Ocean By Richard Branson -Sep 10, 2013

 

 

We're on a mission to save the ocean and all of the beautiful species within it. Mission: Save the Ocean is a TV-documentary series produced by the United Postcode Lotteries as part ofPostcode Lottery Project Oceans, raising awareness of the plight of the oceans.

As a member of the OceanElders, I'm honoured to narrate the series from Necker Island, sharing the stories of people trying to make a difference for the world’s oceans. You can watch the series on Nat Geo Wild from today and on National Geographic Channel on the 10th, 17th and 24th of October.

The OceanElders believe that there are plenty of fish in the ocean to feed the world if fishing is managed properly and done in a sustainable manner. This also needs politicians to make sensible rules and regulations, and for the fishing community to work together with politicians and authorities to protect certain threatened areas and avoid overfishing.

There are sadly many examples around the world where this has not happened and it has gone horribly wrong. One such example is the parable of the Clyde, which The Economist has documented in this excellent article on the devastation of a fishery. It shows just what not to do, and how politicians and the fishing community have let everybody down in such a dramatic way in this instance.

If you overfish a whole region, the fish can never come back, whole livelihoods get lost and the balance in the sea can be lost forever. The whole fishing community and everyone interested in the wellbeing of the ocean has got to look after species under the sea as much as species we can see on land.

 

There is some fantastic work being done to protect species such as rhinos, tigers, lemurs and other animals on earth, but we’ve got to pay just as much attention to the creatures under the sea. One of the organisations leading the way is WildAid, who work closely with Virgin Unite, but much more needs to be done. 

This month, the European Union will vote on a proposed ban on deep-sea bottom trawling, which could the seas and fish stocks some much-needed breathing space. Deep-water trawling should be consigned to history – read Nature’s piece on this vital issue to find out more.

If we do manage the ocean properly, there is plenty to go around for everybody. There are plenty of fish in the sea – but only if they are conserved and protected by everybody on land.

By Richard Branson. Founder of Virgin Group

 Are there plenty of fish in the sea?
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Store - Keiko The Untold Story of the Star of Free Willy

Store - Keiko The Untold Story of the Star of Free Willy | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it

The most unlikely candidate for release back to the wild actually thrived for over 5 years in his home waters, gaining over 3000 lbs during his rehabilitation, mixing it up with wild orcas, swimming across the North Atlantic, and finally passing as a middle aged orca as the only captive orca to ever be successfully rehabilitated and released back to to the ‘wild’ – come join Keiko’s Pod and help Rescue Rehab and Release all of the other whales and dolphins currently in captivity. Keiko’s fans are changing the world in this 20th Anniversary year of the Free Willy!!

 Director: Theresa Demarest
Run Time: 75 minutes 
Format: HD 1080i, Dolby 5.1 SurroundThe Blu-Rays are now available.All pre-orders will start shipping August, 18 2013 A Public Performance Screening License will be required for Theater Screenings, School Screenings, Special Event Screenings, and all other public screenings.
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Behind The Dolphin Smile

Behind The Dolphin Smile | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it
 Ric founded The Dolphin Project in 1970. From his heroic activism in Bimini, Bahamas to his work in over 30 countries around the world, Behind the Dolphin Smile chronicles the life of one of the most well-known voices for dolphins ever to walk (swim) this blue planet. Get your copy today and learn how you can empower yourself and others to help save dolphins! 
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OPERATION BLUE SKIES : Make the skies "dolphin-safe"- stop the carriage of cetaceans to marine parks

OPERATION BLUE SKIES : Make the skies "dolphin-safe"- stop the carriage of cetaceans to marine parks | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it
Petitioning The Cargo Manager OPERATION BLUE SKIES : Make the skies "dolphin-safe"- stop the carriage of cetaceans to marine parks 

Petition by

Freedom Blue

   

This is Freedom Blue's "Operation Blue Skies" - an initiative to identify and support "dolphin-safe" airlines. That is, those airlines and air transport operators who decline to transport whales, dolphins and other cetaceans for the purposes of entertainment to marine parks, aquariums and dolphinariums.

There is a growing recognition world-wide that dolphins, orcas, and other cetaceans do not belong in captivity. Consumer boycotts have forced all of England's marine-mammal exhibits to close. Israel and Australia prohibit the importation of dolphins for use in entertainment. More recently, India banned dolphinariums and other commercial entertainment involving the capture and confinement of cetacean species such as orcas and bottlenose dolphins.

Despite these positive changes, marine amusement parks continue to flourish in other nations. 
It is time to let cargo transport operators who carry captive cetacean specimens for marine amusement parks know that a growing number of people around the world do not support this practice, and therefore cannot support and patronize airline operators who undertake the transport of captive whales and dolphins.

"Operation Blue Skies" aims to identify those operators who pledge support for the rights of cetaceans by refusing carriage of specimens. Freedom Blue asks all concerned citizens to support and patronize those airlines who uphold the Blue Skies ethic, and to urge those carriers currently transporting marine mammals to do the same.

Please refer to our website for more information : www.freedomblue.org

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PrometheusEarth

PrometheusEarth | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it

Captivity Free #Adventurewithus #PandorasJourney Honor the #Orcas Dive in!

 

#OrcaAvengers 

Odin Prometheus's insight:

Via #Cove Guardian #Escape Artist Rayne

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Sea Shepherd Conservation Society - Google+

Sea Shepherd Conservation Society - Google+ | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it
Sea Shepherd Conservation Society - Established in 1977, Sea Shepherd Conservation Society (SSCS) is an international non-profit, marine wildlife conservation organization.
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Disk Detective: We need your help to discover the birthplace of Planets in never-before seen data!

Disk Detective: We need your help to discover the birthplace of Planets in never-before seen data! | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it

We need your help to discover the birthplace of Planets in never-before seen data! WISE is a NASA mission surveying the whole sky in infrared. This project is looking at stars to find dusty debris disks, similar to our asteroid field. These disks suggest that these stars are in the early stages of forming planetary systems. Learning more about these stars can tell us how our Solar System formed.

Computers often confuse debris disks around stars with other astronomical objects. We need your help to sort out what stars actually have these disks from Galaxies and Nebulae.

ou can learn more about the project on the Aboutand Science pages. Or you can get to classifying.

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Quimera (quimeraproject) on Twitter.

Quimera (quimeraproject) on Twitter. | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it
The latest from Quimera (@quimeraproject). Providing strategic sustainability projects and solutions in the fields of mobility and energy through its consultancy, R&D and venture divisions
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Elements Matter (ElementsMatter) on Twitter

Elements Matter (ElementsMatter) on Twitter | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it
The latest from Elements Matter (@ElementsMatter). Dr. RHW : Veritas Vos Liberabit. USA
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SanFranTech (SanFranTech) on Twitter

SanFranTech (SanFranTech) on Twitter | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it
The latest from SanFranTech (@SanFranTech). San Francisco Technology
| Tweets by @Carol_Stephen. San Francisco, CA
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I Demand Corporations Use Recycled Ocean/Social Plastics: The Plastic Bank.

I Demand Corporations Use Recycled Ocean/Social Plastics: The Plastic Bank. | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it
http://plasticbank.org/ - Empowering impoverished people to collect & exchange mixed plastic for hope and opportunities. Join the Social Plastic movement.DescriptionThe Plastic Bank is setting up plastic repurposing centers around the world, where there’s an abundance of both waste plastic and poverty. 

We are empowering people to harvest plastics as a currency they can exchange for tools, household items, parts & 3D printing. 

Our mission is to remove plastic waste from the land, oceans and waterways while helping people ascend from poverty and transition into entrepreneurship.
We call harvesting and repurposing plastics like this “Social Plastic”. 

Our goal is to lead the movement towards worldwide demand for the use of Social Plastic in everyday products. The higher the worldwide demand becomes, the higher the reward will be for harvesting Social Plastic. 

Join our social plastic movement to start changing the world through your purchasing power.

As educated consumers begin to demand the use of recycled ocean plastics in the products they buy, the value of ocean plastics will increase..
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Honor the Orcas, dive in.

Honor the Orcas, dive in. | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it
Earth Science Institute World Project's:

Why Geology rocks.

The forgotten scientists.

Honor the...
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Greenland soars to its highest temperature ever recorded, almost 80 degrees F.

Greenland soars to its highest temperature ever recorded, almost 80 degrees F. | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it
The Danish Meteorological Institute is reporting that on Tuesday, July 30, the mercury rose to 25.9 C (78.6 F) at a station in Greenland, the highest temperature measured in the Arctic country since records began in 1958.
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Liquidmocean

Liquidmocean | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it

Liquidmocean, the joining of liquid and the physical endeavor of movement, is the name attributed to the works of underwater cameraman Mark Thorpe.

 

Mission: To promote positive Ocean stewardship from tourism related service providers and officially appointed tourism agencies within the Pacific region. Company liquidmocean, a play on words connecting the liquid flow of motion associated with Ocean and the travel and sports industries. The unique spelling connects the elements that shape this ideal, the Ocean and movements. liquidmocean at its core is about the promotion of positive Ocean stewardship from travel agencies to individual tourism service providers to engaging our audience with positively reinforced imagery and interactive strategies. 

I am a waterman. All of the imagery in the albums, on the website and in any of my advertising is, unless otherwise stated, taken by me. I've spent the last 17 years working as a freelance underwater cameraman and now reside in Bali where I spend my time as close to the Ocean and waterways as I can, snapping imagery and taking care of the office side of things.

I have a fantastic wife to whom I am totally devoted and a local Mutt named 'Muppet'. I like Kidney Beans, Strawberry Cheesecake and gain sick pleasure from harvesting my own Belly Button Fluff...DescriptionSimplicity is key, enjoyment from the Ocean whether from traveling, adventure experiencing or adrenalin sports we promote those who responsibly promote the connection we have as a species with this watery medium.

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Wildlife campaigners of the World.

Wildlife campaigners of the World. | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it
Wildlife campaigners of the World.
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Demonstration in Tokyo calls for ending Taiji dolphin hunts

Demonstration in Tokyo calls for ending Taiji dolphin hunts | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it

As the dolphin hunt season has begun in Japan, environment activists rallied in Tokyo on Saturday to show their protest against the annual event in the country. According to Action for Marine Mammals, the rally organizer, the demonstration in the capital was only one of the protests around the world. In central Tokyo, there were 50 people who joined the rally bearing banners saying, “Stop the slaughter.”

“Japanese people are responsible for stopping our country’s barbarian dolphin hunt,” said the group’s leader Toshiaki Morioka. Besides joining the protest in Tokyo, there were also others who went to Taiji in Wakayama, which is known for its annual dolphin hunt. The fishing village caught the attention of the world because of a 2009 documentary film called The Cove. Known for winning international recognition, including the 2010 Academy Award, the film featured how dolphins are captured and slaughtered in the southern town. The film also described Taiji as “a little town with a really big secret.” When the dolphins and whales are captured, some are placed in aquariums while the rest are slaughtered for meat. The dolphin hunt season lasts for months.

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Earth Science Institute World

Earth Science Institute World | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it
OBJECTIVE: "Bring the wonders of Science to as many as we can one day at a time"
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Timeline Photos | Facebook

Timeline Photos | Facebook | Making a difference in the World | Scoop.it

Sea Shepherd Australia Liked · August 31   
Good morning Sydney! The Sam Simon is open for free tours today from now until 5pm. We had an amazing turnout yesterday, and would love to see as many of you as possible today. Come on down to Circular Quay and meet the newest asset to Neptunes Navy.

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