Make Mathematics Accessible and Meaningful
5 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rachel Dwyer
Scoop.it!

Primary Magazine - Issue 28: The Art of Mathematics - NCETM

Primary Magazine - Issue 28: The Art of Mathematics - NCETM | Make Mathematics Accessible and Meaningful | Scoop.it
Explore the NCETM Primary Magazine - Issue 28. Published monthly, the magazine includes a range of features and professional development materials.
Rachel Dwyer's insight:

This particular article is a fabulous resource that now I see several others have curated.

This article talks about a particular artist, Orla Kieley, who creates handbags, hats, etc., which have particular designs and patterns that show some consistency but also variation.

At first, when looking at this article, I did not think that this would be meaningful and accessible for my students. In many ways, it reminded me of the mathmatical eyes that we implemented in the classroom, causing students to find the math in their world. However, then I began to look at more examples of ways that this could be included in the classroom, such as with measurement, perimeter, etc.

For my teaching, having students look at particular images and examples from different content areas, whether science, art, music, etc. and then analyzing them to find the math allows them to make this school to world connection for more meaningful and accessible learning. They can discover and understand the particular image as something that is close to them, in that they understand its origin and presence in their world, and can then use the math that they know to then understand and explore new math. The students could even find and bring in their own examples for the class to look at.

This type of activity and learning also allows students to view and perceive what they experience in a different way, that the math that they are learning and experiencing is relevant and present in their everyday lives. These discoveries and connections will motivate and engage students in their learning, and they will begin to challenge and push themselves to make these connections and discoveries on their own. I am definitely looking forward to coming up with some ideas and other examples for students. This also adds to my own learning and understanding of not only Mathmatical Eyes but also open-ended problems.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rachel Dwyer from Making Math Accesible & Meaningful
Scoop.it!

Real World Math Problems

Real World Math Problems | Make Mathematics Accessible and Meaningful | Scoop.it
Mathalicious lessons teach standards-based math through real-world topics that students care about.

Via Madeline Morgan
Rachel Dwyer's insight:

This website makes math accessible and meaningful for students. On the website, they provide you with lessons and activities that have some sort of creative title and theme, such as Stairway to Heaven or Need for Speed. Then they provide the students with problem-solving activities that allow them to focus on and explore content that is within the curriculum in a fun and engaging way.

They use real world examples and themes in what they create, and encourage students in their learning and math experiences to make these connections and to find math in the world around them.

These problems remind me of the types of problems that we created in our Open-Ended Problem Solving (except they are not open-ended).

In terms of my own teaching, I intend to incorporate these types of problems into math instruction. I could use the problems that they provide, but also come up with my own, and then even have the students come up with their own. This allows students to do math relating to something that they know about and has purpose for them, and their familiarity and knowledge of it allows it to be accessible. They can reach it and understand it.

The students, through these problems, can think about math in terms of their world, and see the meaning behind the math and how our world can help us to understand it. The problems represent a wide variety of topics and ideas which are interesting and allow all students to find something that they are interested in. I have definitely got lots of ideas and examples which are starting to come to mind of what I could do to make these connections. I was wondering about how I might take what we have experienced in Dr. Bote's class and to then create some similar to these, so I am excited to have discovered this source. I found this on my own, but then saw that Madeline and Kayla had it on theirs as well. I think that the students' learning will now be more reinforced and relevant to their lives and experiences. They will no longer ask me: "Will we ever even use this in the real world and when we get older?" They can practice and learn to be explorers and discoverers who question, critique, and examine the world around them to make connections in math.

more...
Kay Clarke's curator insight, December 12, 2013 7:24 PM

This website is AMAZING!  I had never heard of this source before, but Maddy actually scooped this.  The intro video speaks for itself. This website is trying to work with teachers to give them alternatives to traditional math lessons.  It provides lessons that are Standards based, making it easy to pick and chose lessons that can fit into the curriculum.  This website makes it easy for teachers to create lessons that are actually interesting to students.  Students aren't just learning math, they are learning skills to solve problems about things they care about.  The topics on the site include things like Nike, the NBA, outer space, things that students wouldn't think normally go together with math.  Being able to hook kids onto a math lesson, really get them engaged is a difficult task for a teacher.  However, this website, from the looks of it, has some great potential to serve as an aid to teachers.  I know as a future teacher, I will be looking everywhere to find contexts that would be relevant to my kids.  Sample lessons that are already tied to CCSS would be even better.  

Corinne Tomaszewski's curator insight, December 15, 2013 11:38 AM

I saw this scooped on another intern's site and I think that it has great potential. Just by exmporing for a few minutes I could see that it provides teacher with alternatives to traditional math lessons and really strives to make math meaningful and applicable for students. Unfortunately it does come with a price, so in terms of accessiblity...it isn't for teachers. Also, when I was looking at some of the lessons it seemed to be geared more towards the upper elementayr grades. If I were to use this as a resource and pay the monthly fee I would hope they have adaptations for different grade levels. I think the idea behind it is  great!! Making math concrete and in a real world context is crucial for helping students understand and later transfer that knowledge. 

Kimberly Wynkoop's curator insight, January 26, 2014 9:25 PM

This website has many premade lessons that can be used as is or as a jump off point for your own students.  The lessons are all real world problems. Many of your students will be able to relate to the lessons content.

Rescooped by Rachel Dwyer from Making Math Accesible & Meaningful
Scoop.it!

Reaching Students: 18 Simple Ways To Make A Lasting Impact On Your Students

Reaching Students: 18 Simple Ways To Make A Lasting Impact On Your Students | Make Mathematics Accessible and Meaningful | Scoop.it
Reaching Students: 18 Simple Ways To Make A Lasting Impact On Your Students, including ideas, tips, and strategies.

Via Madeline Morgan
more...
Madeline Morgan's curator insight, December 2, 2013 9:08 AM

When I found this website I knew that it was not geared towards math, but the ideas shown on this website can be used in all subjects in the classroom. While teaching math to the students I believe the way the students feel and the classroom environment as a whole has a huge impact on how student's learn. If teachers make connections with their students and are able to make them comfortable the learning and teaching will be much easier. From this article I really liked the section that said, "Tell stories. Everybody loves a story. Tell them—in a way that is natural and comfortable for you—and students will begin to see you in three dimensions, as a full human being interacting with them for their own intellectual growth." I love this and plan to use this in my future classroom and math classroom. As a student I always loved when my teachers gave me a story to compare my learning to. It always helped my thinking. In my math classroom when teaching, I want to give my students stories and real world examples that will help them understand. This will not only show the students that math takes place outside of school, but it will help them making meaning of what they are learning. Building a strong relationship with your student's it critical in order to teach them any subject. In math this is very important because student's usually have a poor relationship with math. For example, they do not like it. As educators if we can get students to build a healthy relationship with their teachers, peers, and the subject at hand the learning will come much easier.

Julie Price's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:16 PM

I love this website. I think that it provides so many important points and great tips for developing a positive and lasting relationship with students. One of the points that I really like from this article is knowing what to overlook. I think that not pointing out every mistake a child makes is important, especially in math. Instead we need to try to help students redirect their thinking so that they can learn through their mistakes and work through the process. I am going to keep as many of these tips in mind when I am developing a safe and inviting learning community in my classroom. Another important point that this article makes in the importance of "modeling the challenge of convention." This is important as we move to CCSS because they way that we are teaching students math and the way that they are learning it are much different than what was traditionally done in the past. I think all teachers should read this article.

Scooped by Rachel Dwyer
Scoop.it!

Growth Mindset and the Common Core Math Standards

Growth Mindset and the Common Core Math Standards | Make Mathematics Accessible and Meaningful | Scoop.it
For many years, intelligence was thought to be static (fixed) and could not be altered. Informal research has shown this to be particularly true when it comes to students thinking about their mathema
Rachel Dwyer's insight:

This particular resource from edutopia expands on and extends the idea of "growth mindset" from Carol Dweck, or the belief that intellectual abilities can be cultivated and developed through application and instruction, that the brain and intelligence are not fixed, but rather can experience growth and success over periods of time. They also indicate that this has been found to be particularly true when it comes to mathematics and children constantly growing, building, and expanding their knowledge when it comes to math.

As I was reading this article, I immediately thought of the Train Your Brains that Kayla and I have been doing in our classroom for our Open-Ended Problem Solving. The whole idea behind train your brain is that you are stretching your brain to think about, practice, and learn concepts that are new to you and that you are not familiar with. Also your brain has to always be thinking and working, so having challenges allows the brain to grow more and expand more.

I think that having these activities in the classroom will continue to be meaningful and important. Prior to reading this article, I had not even thought about this growth mindset and did not know about the research behind its relevance to mathematics. Intelligence can be altered through training and experiences.

This means that every moment that I spend with the students in the classroom is not only important, but extremely influential on their learning and growth.

I plan to consider and implement a growth mindset in my classroom, and to encourage students that they are always learning and growing their intelligence. Without a challenge, they will keep on knowing and practicing what is familiar to them, but their brain can grow if they keep being challenged and trying new things.

I think that it will be a great model and perspective for them with this new curriculum, and particularly with the challenging math that it involves. I constantly need to challenge them, and diversify their learning experiences so that they are always using different skills and methods in an attempt to discover and learn about new and different things.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rachel Dwyer
Scoop.it!

Dan Meyer at TEDxNYED

Dan Meyer teaches high school math outside of Santa Cruz, CA, and explores the intersection of math instruction, multimedia, and inquiry-based learning. He r...
Rachel Dwyer's insight:

I found this lecture by Dan Meyer to be extremely informative and got me thinking about a lot of ways of making mathematics accessible and meaning. Dan discusses the five reasons of why our instruction in mathmatics is no longer effective, and how the textbook and instruction that we give to students equates to watching an episode of Two and A Half Men, and then calling it a day. He also discusses how students become impatient and intolerant of the types of problems and content that we throw at them, because it simply requires repeating exactly what they see, and does not connect to their world in any way. He demonstrates how he recreates and writes problems that provide and allow for math reasoning and patient problem-solving.

This impacts my own teaching in that now I will look at math content and curriculum for students with a different perspective. I think that the new curriculum provides improved methods and examples for students to help them grasp new content, but I feel that in terms of the Math curriculum, they do not provide enough real world and real life connections. Dan talks about including actual images and videos from real life to put along with a problem. In the world today we are technology-driven and focused, and by including these in different problems in math, we allow students to be interested and connected to what they are learning. They can relate to its presence in their own experiences, and will be curious and eager to explore it and to figure it out. It is no longer just another problem to do, but a circumstance in their world that they want to get to the bottom of.

I will now consider and come up with ways to make connections among technology, problem-solving, inquiry-based learning, and math instructions. I had never thought about inquiry in Mathematics, but now I see the importance of it.

Thanks to Dr. Bote's methods class with the Open-Ended Problem Solving, the students in my classroom have experienced problems that allow them to inquire, imagine, and create. They are also tied to the real world, and cause them to think about and make these connections. They have even looked at Mathmatical Eyes, where they apply math to an image that represents something in their world. I think that these have been effective in allowing the students to connect math and their world, and to use that to further their knowledge and understanding.

After reading and reflecting on this video, I think that now I will come up with more problems and experiences that connect technology, inquiry-based learning, the real world, and mathematics, so that students can achieve effective learning and instruction that they have the patience to work through and experience.

more...
No comment yet.