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E-readers Growing in Popularity - Blue Volcano Media

E-readers Growing in Popularity - Blue Volcano Media | madisonulczak1 | Scoop.it

The use of censorship and burning of books in Fahrenheit 451 was to enable education to be equal among all potential students and for the primary source of pleasure and entertainment to be centered around television and radio. The reduction and eventually burning of books took away any advantage and individual had on gaining more knowledge from reading the book. The decline of books was not only government enacted however, the decline also came from societies lack of interest in reading and incline towards more technological activities. This article discussed the rapid decline of paper books as the rapid increase of E-books and Kindles begin to take place. However unlike the society in the novel the decline of paper books is not due to censorship and the wish for the end of knowledge and reading but by the ability for the public to access more books in one place through an E-book or Kindle. The technological advancements of these readers prove to be the exact opposite of what affect technology had on the society of Fahrenheit 451, thankfully. Recent analysis of the E-books and Kindles show to provide an increase of mobility, personalization, and actual read-in-take, almost the exact opposite what the reduction tangible books had in Fahrenheit 451. This article offers the hope in technology that Fahrenheit 451 tried to extinguish. It is possible that maybe instead of destroying education and society technology could enhance societies knowledge and desire to learn. 

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Occupy Wall Street censorship: A relative question

Occupy Wall Street censorship: A relative question | madisonulczak1 | Scoop.it

This video showing clips of the hostile and unfair raids during the occupy wall street protests provides a clear example of how the censorship that goes on today is much like the censorship that went on in Bradbury's novel. In the video police were clearly pushing away journalists, whom were only trying to do their job. The police made an attempt to keep out the press and censor what was going on, by censoring the reality of the protests society was forced into ignorance of what was really going on, much like in the novel. However, in Fahrenheit 451 censorship of all books was the law not to only push society to ignorance but to push all of society to such ignorance that it was their ignorance that made them equal. Bradbury suggested that by the censorship of all books not one person could be smarter than the next, allowing everyone to eventually be equal. The destroying of all books led society to a superficial world confined only of the present and future, not many had any idea of the past and what past societies were like. Those that did know were often seen as dangerous and investigated such as Clarisse McClellan. Clarisse spoke of nature and the past and what her "uncle" had told her. Her new way of thinking intrigued Montag and seemed to be the spark that ironically gave him the desire to stop destroying books. Clarisse was far more educated than most of society. In the novel the firemen seemed to rule the general public, keeping them ignorant. Knowledge is what leads to power, and sometimes power is feared, especially if the power is not in the hands of the government, that is when the government steps in and begins censorship. The censorship of the occupy wall street riots was not intended to promote equality among society but rather just to keep the movement from spreading to the knowledge of the public. By not allowing journalists and reporters into the riots the public does not know exactly what goes on, only what they are told by the government.

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Modern technology is changing the way our brains work, says neuroscientist

Modern technology is changing the way our brains work, says neuroscientist | madisonulczak1 | Scoop.it

This article made me instantly think about Fahrenheit 451 and I was able to quickly make many connections. At just the beginning of the article Greenfield states "This crisis (technology) could reshape how we interact with each other, alter what makes us happy, and modify our capacity for reaching our full potential as individuals." This statement is easily identifiable with the impact technology had on the society in Fahrenheit 451. Clarisse McClellan, one who was not smothered by technology was able to feel, to be happy, to appreciate nature and just life itself. When she asks Montag simple questions ones about the sky, or dew on the grass he is left in a state of confusion, and to make matters worse when she questions him about being happy he realizes he is anything but. The society of Fahrenheit 451 is so overwhelmed by technology that no one has any sense of what is right and wrong, their morals, or any sense of what it means to live. The majority of them plug those "seashells" into their ear, sit back and interact with their "family" on the walls. They speed in their cars so quickly that grass is a green blur and hitting a dog is a way to relieve stress, life has no meaning to them. Although this article talks a great deal about the medical technology advances and how they have both positive and negative affects on society the author makes some nerve racking points on what the technology of things such as computers or ipods could potentially have on society. The author notes that it has been studied and understood that those who are glued to screens have distinguished shorter attention spans, reduced personal communication skills and less of an ability to think abstractly. With those noted changed to the brain I am left to wonder how much longer it will take for our society to evolve to that of the one in Bradbury's novel. 

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