Macroeconomics
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German Bundesbank sees housing overvaluation up to 20% in cities

German Bundesbank sees housing overvaluation up to 20% in cities | Macroeconomics | Scoop.it
Jonah Manley's insight:

Essentially this article outlines how, due to the ever increasing price of houses in cities throughout Europe, and in this case Germany, the valuers of these houses have been affected by the mindset that these houses are very expensive due to just their location. The German Bundesbank believes that this has caused around a 20% overvaluation of many properties in cities across the country. This has meant a vast inability of homeowners to sell and equally for players on the market to find an appropriate home at the right price. When the housing market begins to freeze up due to reasons such as this houses can depreciate further than the overvaluation that was put on them. Say a house was worth $500,000 and it was valued at $600,000, the house would be much less likely to sell for quite some time, eventually depreciation due to a slow market would reduce the house's value to $450,000 meaning that the owners would lose out on 10% of the house's original value instead of gaining 20% on it. When it comes to the price of houses these figures are very important because firstly the sums of money are very large, and also houses are sold so frequently that a similar problem across the board could mean money being where it shouldnt in large amounts.

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AS Macroeconomics Key Term Glossary |

Key term glossary for AS macroeconomics

Via Stefano KaliFire
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Sue Hall's curator insight, January 31, 2014 9:42 AM

Brilliant for AS economists

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BBC NEWS | Business | Market Data | Overview

BBC NEWS | Business | Market Data | Overview | Macroeconomics | Scoop.it
The BBC News market data service covers more than 20,000 global financial instruments:
Overview
Jonah Manley's insight:

In order to quantify world economics, the rate of improvement, decline and change in the economy, many elements are taken into account. The graphs shown on the BBC's market data overview are the main ones that are used to represent these factors of the economies both here in Britain and around the world. The most important graph shown and probably the one which is most widely recognised is the FTSE 100. This is a share index of the 100 companies listed on the London stock exchange with the highest market capitalization. The constituents of this "top 100" is decided upon quarterly in order to maintain the accuracy of the index. The graphs shown in this link all relate to the British economy however they would both reflect the market in other similar countries and apply equally elsewhere given the relevant accurate statistics.

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Top 10 most gender equal countries in the world

Top 10 most gender equal countries in the world | Macroeconomics | Scoop.it
Iceland leads four Nordic countries at the top of the table, while the Philippines joins the top five for the first time in the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap 2013 report, published today.
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Throughout history it has been the case that males leave the home in order to make a living whilst the females stay in order to look after their young or otherwise. In the last 100 or so years however it has become a much bigger issue that women are given the freedom to go out and earn a living themselves, as was the case with the pressure on women being allowed to vote. This article, and particularly the interactive map it presents, gives an excellent perspective on how women now fit into the societies of countries the world over. Although it is not shown, research leads me to believe that Yemen suffers from the most inequality of any country with given statistics, lying in 136th. It is little surprise that the top 4 is made up of Scandinavian countries, thi9s is determined by the relatively new gender gap index, it was created with the idea that 'what can be measured can be addressed'. It is of huge benefit to everybody for women to have their place in society, and especially in the work place. Allowing more women into higher ranked jobs simply means a likely improvement of efficiency in said job, i.e. having two people apply for a job will on average increase the rate of success of the new employee by half. Women are becoming increasingly more skilled and schooled in much of the world and so anything that this group of economically active individuals can add to a country's economy has to have positivfe impacts. 

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Bank of England

Bank of England | Macroeconomics | Scoop.it
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This is the central bank of the United Kingdom and the model on which most modern central banks have been based; established in 1694, it is the second oldest central bank in the world. It was established to act as the English Government's banker, and is still the banker for her majesty's government almost 320 years later. It was, up until 1946, a private institution but was nationalised after the Second World War in order to aid Britain in it's huge war debt. Currently the banks main aim is to bring about monetary stability , this includes both the price of goods being stable and also maintaining confidence in the currency, I.e. Pound Sterling. The method of control: "Monetary policy in the UK usually operates through the price at which money is lent – the interest rate. In March 2009 the MPC announced that in addition to setting Bank Rate, it would start to inject money directly into the economy by purchasing financial assets – often known as quantitative easing." - Bank of England -> Monetary Policy.

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