Macbeth Historical Background Project - The Gunpowder Plot
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BBC - Gunpowder plot: The background

BBC - Gunpowder plot: The background | Macbeth Historical Background Project - The Gunpowder Plot | Scoop.it

When Queen Elizabeth I took the throne, her laws indicated a split between the Catholic and Protestant church. The Catholics could not freely practice their religion and if they didn't attend Protestant churches on Sunday or holy days then they would be fined. As King James I took over, Catholics hoped for a change, but to no avail, matters remained unfair. A group of conspirators channelled their rage and formed a plot to lash out against the King and his Parliament.

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nicolette tomasetti's comment, November 15, 2012 12:04 PM
I do not agree with King James I and his parliament's rules against others. Everyone has their own rights and freedoms, in this case everyone should be entitled to their own religous opinions. No one should be fined for not being protestant, it should of been their choice wether or not they wanted to be catholic or protestant. Running a parliament in this way will never get you respect from your followers.
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The Plot - UK Parliament

  Disappointed by the failure of James I’s peace treaty negotiations with Spain to improve their position, a handful of young Catholic gentlemen from the Midlands, some of whom had been involved in previous plotting, decided to take action.

In May of 1604, five dissatisfied came together and hatched one of the most famous assassination plots ever; the Gunpowder Plot. It all began with a connection that one of the men had through his family to the Parliament. Staying in an apartment nearby, they were lucky enough to rent out a cellar just below the chambers in which King James and the House of Commons as well as the House of Lords would be seated on the opening of Parliament. Carefully, they were able to insert 36 barrels of gunpowder into the cellar. That amount of gunpowder was more than enough to take out not only everyone in the room above, but the surrounding buildings with all the people inside them, creating a plethora of innocent murders. If the plot had come to fruition, King James I would have been killed, and the men had planned to capture his daughter Elizabeth, but they had never actually decided what to do after this. Fortunately, the plot was soiled and many lives were saved before the plot was, quite literally, ignited.

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King James I's comment, November 14, 2012 10:46 PM
I completely understand that Guy Fawkes and his conspirators were unhappy with the British government, but I think this was not the way to go about settling the problem. As mentioned above, innocent lives would have been lost if the plot actually worked. The conspirators should have planned a simpler and less dangerous plot, such as an assassination of King James. The plot would have caused devastation to England, and it would have done more harm than good.
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Who Was Involved? : The Character Profiles

Who Was Involved? : The Character Profiles | Macbeth Historical Background Project - The Gunpowder Plot | Scoop.it

The character profiles are exposed, from the Plotters to the members of the noble Crown.

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On This Day: Guy Fawkes Caught; Gunpowder Plot Foiled

On This Day: Guy Fawkes Caught; Gunpowder Plot Foiled | Macbeth Historical Background Project - The Gunpowder Plot | Scoop.it

On the day of the opening of Parliament, the plotters were prepared to exterminate the King and his fellow Lords. Guy Fawkes was guarding the 36 barrels of gunpowder they had stragetically placed below the King's ceremony chamber, and was waiting for his cue to light the gunpowder. Unbeknowest to Fawkes and his fellow conspirators were the lose lips of Francis Treman. In a letter to the Catholic nobleman Lord Monteagle, Treman revealed the plot and urged him not to attend the opening cermenony of Parliament. Monteagle forwarded this letter to Robert Cecil, the King’s minister, who warned the guards of the supposed plot. No immediate action was taken by the King’s staff, so the plotters thought they could still continue with the prearranged setup. A last minute search was conducted in the cellars on the day of reckoning, and Guy Fawkes was arrested and tortured in the Tower of London for information. Eventually, all the conspirators were caught and sentenced to death for treason.

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BBC - History - British History in depth: Gunpowder Plot

This video sets the scene for the Gunpowder Plot, bringing us back to 1604 and revealing a CGI recreation of Parliament and the area around it where the plot was hatched. It also delves into the 'what if?' scenario of the potential sucess of the plan, and the magnitude of the explosion that would have taken place.

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Who Was Involved? : Robert Catesby - The Real Brains Behind The Gunpowder Plot

Who Was Involved? : Robert Catesby - The Real Brains Behind The Gunpowder Plot | Macbeth Historical Background Project - The Gunpowder Plot | Scoop.it

Lesser known Robert Catesby of the 1605 conspiracy and head of the Gunpowder Plot is believed to be the actual brains behind the operation.

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Who Was Involved? : Brit's Most Famous Traitor, Guy Fawkes

Who Was Involved? : Brit's Most Famous Traitor, Guy Fawkes | Macbeth Historical Background Project - The Gunpowder Plot | Scoop.it

A historic celebration for the English, arguably more popular than Halloween, derived from an infamous conspirator. After being captured, and before being put to death, Guy Fawks revealed the names of the other plotters involved.

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