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In lupus patients, anti-inflammatory immune cells are maturing into pro-inflammatory cell types, study

In lupus patients, anti-inflammatory immune cells are maturing into pro-inflammatory cell types, study | lupus awareness | Scoop.it
A pressing question in lupus is why cells that are supposed to keep inflammation at bay don’t do their job. Research has now shown that B cells that normally regulate inflammation are signaled to become pro-inflammatory instead.
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9 Lifestyle Changes I Always Recommend To Patients With Autoimmune Diseases

9 Lifestyle Changes I Always Recommend To Patients With Autoimmune Diseases | lupus awareness | Scoop.it
Identifying and eliminating the root cause of autoimmune diseases requires detective work, trial and error, and patience—but the results are worth it. Here are nine strategies I recommend.
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The Link Between a Mother's Immune System and a Child’s Autism

The Link Between a Mother's Immune System and a Child’s Autism | lupus awareness | Scoop.it
Researchers are studying how infections during pregnancy may affect fetal brain development.
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Lyme: The Infectious Disease Equivalent of Cancer, Says Top Duke Oncologist

Lyme: The Infectious Disease Equivalent of Cancer, Says Top Duke Oncologist | lupus awareness | Scoop.it
Last week, I mentioned the case of Dr. Neil Spector, whose long-undiagnosed Lyme Disease resulted in irreversible heart failure and ultimately, a heart transplant. Dr. Spector, author of Gone in a Heartbeat: A Physician’s Search for True Healing, is the Sandra Coates Associate Professor of Medicine and Associate Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology at Duke University School of Medicine. As the Director of Developmental Therapeutics at the Duke Cancer Institute, he’s a leader in applying translational research to the clinical development of molecularly targeted personalized cancer therapies. Here, Dr. Spector shares his story, explains what Lyme and cancer have in common (hint: a LOT), and encourages us with his vision for the future. Like so many of us, your Lyme was missed by multiple physicians. What were your symptoms? I don’t recall a tick bite, but I first started having symptoms in 1993, mostly cardiac arrhythmias. I had unprovoked palpitations that lasted fifteen to twenty seconds. There was something ominous about the way they felt and came on, but they were never captured because by the time I got to the ER, they’d resolve. And because I had just moved to a new state and was extremely busy with my career, the easy diagnosis was that I was just stressed. Doctors were saying I looked and seemed fine, but I wasn’t. I also had an early episode of brain fog that came on out of the blue. I gave a lecture at University of Miami School of Medicine for an hour, and afterward, I had zero recollection of anything I’d just said. It felt like I’d taken a hundred Benadryl. The feeling lasted for three weeks and then spontaneously lifted. Then in 1996, I developed arthritis in my wrist–it was really sudden and severe. I couldn’t hold utensils or do anything with my hands. I was put on doxycycline for an independent reason that had nothing to do with Lyme, and within twenty-four hours, the arthritis completely resolved. That’s when I felt I definitely had Lyme. At this time, my arrhythmias were getting worse and more complex. I was extremely fatigued, had burning in my heels, and night terrors. The night terrors and burning in your heels sound like classic Bartonella. They do. The weirder my symptoms became, the harder it was for my physicians to piece together. I didn’t have my first Lyme test until four years after my first arrhythmia. Wow. And how many did you have until it came back positive? I had three at a major lab that were considered negative. Then I found a greatILADS doctor from North Jersey and she ordered the fourth test and sent it to a lab called IGeneX. That test was positive. How many doctors did you see before you found your Lyme-literate doctor? I had about five ER visits with my heart issues. I saw a cardiologist and my internist, who is very caring and really tried to help. Then I went to a rheumatologist who ran a whole auto-immune panel–Lupus, Sjogren’s, you name it. Did the Rheumatologist test you for Lyme? No, he didn’t. Wow, that’s mind-blowing. Yeah, it is. Do you feel that ruling out Lyme should be imperative before diagnosing a patient with an auto-immune disease like MS, Fibromyalgia, or Rheumatoid Arthritis? Absolutely! And Alzheimer’s. Something has to trigger an autoimmune disease. It doesn’t matter if this occurs in one percent or seventy-eight percent of the patient population–to allow people to go down a path of progressive neurodegeneration when they could be treated is unconscionable. You have famously compared cancer to Lyme. What are their similarities? To me, Lyme is the infectious disease equivalent of cancer. We don’t talk about cancer as just one disease anymore, and we should stop talking about Lyme this way. There are so many strains and co-infections. When you’re bitten by a tick, you can get five or ten different infections at the same time. I also find it ludicrous to call all tick-borne disease, Lyme Disease. In breast cancer, we don’t just say, “You have breast cancer,” because that simply doesn’t mean anything anymore. The language is important because it has a bearing on treatment. With cancer, we know that administering one algorithmic form of treatment doesn’t work. You have to understand the wiring that drives those tumors–the nuances, the mutations–and target them specifically. I think we need to. (Photo credit: Dr. Neil Sector) What else? I also think it’s ridiculous that nobody in the mainstream Lyme research world has given too much thought to the whole resistance issue. In cancer, it’s been known for decades. We are always trying to figure out how tumor cells evade the immune system or resist chemotherapy, so the fact that persisters are such a new phenomenon to them, is shocking. Why wouldn’t this bacteria figure out how to evade the immune system and antibiotic therapy? We already know this is true for syphilis; they’re sister diseases. We need to understand the molecular biology of the bacteria, too. Part of the whole metastatic infectious nature of Lyme is the changing of shapes–the classic screwdriver verses the cystic form–and cancer cells are the same way. They change shapes and become less sensitive to chemo; they become more aggressive, mobile, and invasive. And so in cancer, we aim to target the new shape to our therapeutic advantage. We also need to think out of the box with treatments, the way we have with cancer. I feel there’s too much reliance on antibiotics. Antibiotics will be the mainstay, like chemo is in cancer, but we need more targeted therapies. There’s very good animal data from the Lyme literature suggesting why some strains end up in the heart verses joints verses brain. Those are not random events, just like they’re not in cancer. It’s not karma or bad luck. There are biological reasons for this. It’s important to understand that because there may be ways to block it, and the answer may not be antibiotic-based. You’ve talked about how both Lyme and cancer feed on sugar, as well. Yes. Their metabolic requirements are very similar. In cancer, we have taken advantage of that by trying to develop treatment strategies to starve people of carbohydrates for several days and then treat them with glucose pneumatics that look like glucose but aren’t, and so are taken up by tumors and essentially kill the tumor’s metabolic pathways. Interesting. Could that work for Lyme? It could, potentially. I think we should at least start testing in laboratory models to consider whether this works for Lyme. I don’t know that it would be a standalone treatment, but maybe it sensitizes the bacteria and makes them more susceptible to antibiotics. What’s your take on the recent study linking Lyme Disease to glioblastoma, the deadly brain cancer that took the life of VP Joe Biden’s son, Beau. Throughout the years, there’ve been a lot of links made between infectious agents and cancer. For anyone who says it’s impossible, I’d ask, who would have ever thought thirty years ago that H. Pylori was the causative agent for stomach cancer? Or that HPV virus can cause cervical and head and neck cancers? Or that Epstein Barr can cause lymphoma? So it is not far-fetched to say that a bacteria that causes inflammation can cause the perfect storm for developing a tumor. I think to say Lyme is causative for glioblastoma will require more studies, but I think it’s interesting. There should be money available to do this research to determine the link, and if it is determined to be the cause, then as with H. Pylori, we should be treating aggressively with anti-borrelia treatment. It seems like oncologists would have the right kind of thinking to unravel some of these mysteries. Absolutely. What other areas of medicine should we be pooling from? I would start with cancer biologists and basic immunologists. They figured out the immune system is not recognizing tumor cells and killing them because these cells have hijacked and usurped a normal response in the body that shuts down the immune system to their advantage. Once this was discovered, we saw a transformational change in the treatment of cancer where people with metastatic melanoma are now going into remission and living years cancer-free, whereas it was a death sentence 5 years ago. You have to ask yourself, if you have this persistent inflammation from Lyme that isn’t eradicated, is this putting the brakes on the immune system. What do you make of the fact that animal studies in this field are virtually ignored, when they are given so much credence in other areas of medicine? If we threw out animal studies in cancer, we’d be nowhere. So I don’t quite understand the distinction here. If we say we see persistent infections in dogs, and we also see the same in humans, what’s the relationship there? It seems scientifically ignorant that in the other ninety-nine percent of science, outside of Lyme, people are very willing to accept data that comes from animals. Not as the Holy Grail, but it does provide valuable information. It helps you to figure out what to more insightfully study in humans. A lot of existing Lyme research has involved population studies using western blots, which are lousy, antiquated tests. And that’s what a lot of “name” researchers consider valuable! It’s not valuable research in my mind or in the minds of a lot of scientists. When I speak to eminent cancer biologists or world-class immunologists, they don’t get why people are hanging on to 1950s research. Thankfully, there are scientists from outside the Lyme field who have gotten into it because they see a tremendous need. They are lending remarkable insight that will lead to the next breakthrough. The more people we bring in who haven’t drunk the Kool-Aid, the faster we’ll turn this around. Dogmatic thinking doesn’t belong in medicine. Is there hope to eliminate these infections completely? Absolutely. I think so. If we can take people with metastatic cancers who had 6 months to live, and we can eradicate their cancers, I find it really hard to believe we can’t eradicate Lyme. What do you say to people who are in the black hole and fear they’ll never get better? I tell them we’ve only just begun to fight and to hang in there. I tell them what I tell my cancer patients- to do what you can to stay healthy because better treatments are just around the corner. I honestly believe that, because we are going to repudiate the dogmatic approach that has led to a lot of suffering. And I know how hard it is when you’re suffering to see any light and to not know how you’ll get through another moment, but many of us have been there and there will be better times ahead. There’s no question in my mind.
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What Causes Lupus' Impact on Immune System?

What Causes Lupus' Impact on Immune System? | lupus awareness | Scoop.it
What Causes Lupus' Impact on Immune System? Certain cells seem to malfunction and create inflammation instead of fighting the disease, research say WebMD News from HealthDay By Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, March 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists have found new clues that help explain what's going wrong in the immune systems of people with lupus -- insight they hope will lead to new therapies, or help guide current treatment choices. Lupus has several forms, but the most common is systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In SLE, the immune system mistakenly produces antibodies against the body's own tissue. The onslaught can have widespread effects, damaging the skin, joints, heart, lungs, kidneys and brain, according to the Lupus Foundation of America. The disease mostly strikes women, usually starting in their 20s or 30s, the foundation says. In the new study, the researchers found evidence that in people with lupus, some of the immune system's "B cells" mature the wrong way -- so that they promote inflammation instead of fighting it. The findings, published online March 8 in the journal Immunity, could help in developing new lupus therapies, said senior researcher Claudia Mauri. She is a professor of immunology at University College London in the United Kingdom. In people without lupus, anti-inflammatory B cells appear to prevent excessive production of a protein called interferon-alpha, explained Mauri. That's a critical job because too much interferon-alpha leads to too many B cells that produce antibodies, the study authors said. Antibodies are necessary soldiers in the body's defense against infection, but in lupus, some of those antibodies target the body itself. "We will continue to work to develop new [treatment] strategies that harness the anti-inflammatory B cells in patients with SLE," Mauri said. Right now, a number of drugs are used to treat lupus, including immune-system suppressors such as cyclophosphamide and tacrolimus, and anti-malaria drugs like hydroxychloroquine -- which can ease the fatigue, joint pain and skin rash that lupus commonly causes, according to the Lupus Foundation of America. In some cases, doctors try a drug called rituximab, an IV medication designed to kill off certain B cells. Rituximab is approved to treat certain cancers and rheumatoid arthritis -- another autoimmune disease; but some lupus patients respond to the medication, too, the study authors said.
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Study Suggests Causes for Lupus' Impact on Immune System

Study Suggests Causes for Lupus' Impact on Immune System | lupus awareness | Scoop.it
Certain cells seem to malfunction and create inflammation instead of fighting the disease, research say. Getty Images Lupus mostly strikes women, usually starting in their 20s or 30s. We respect your privacy. Tuesday, March 08, 2016 Scientists have found new clues that help explain what's going wrong in the immune systems of people with lupus -- insight they hope will lead to new therapies, or help guide current treatment choices. Lupus has several forms, but the most common is systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In SLE, the immune system mistakenly produces antibodies against the body's own tissue. The onslaught can have widespread effects, damaging the skin, joints, heart, lungs, kidneys and brain, according to the Lupus Foundation of America. The disease mostly strikes women, usually starting in their 20s or 30s, the foundation says. In the new study, the researchers found evidence that in people with lupus, some of the immune system's "B cells" mature the wrong way -- so that they promote inflammation instead of fighting it. The findings, published online March 8 in the journal Immunity, could help in developing new lupus therapies, said senior researcher Claudia Mauri. She is a professor of immunology at University College London in the United Kingdom. In people without lupus, anti-inflammatory B cells appear to prevent excessive production of a protein called interferon-alpha, explained Mauri. That's a critical job because too much interferon-alpha leads to too many B cells that produce antibodies, the study authors said. Antibodies are necessary soldiers in the body's defense against infection, but in lupus, some of those antibodies target the body itself. "We will continue to work to develop new [treatment] strategies that harness the anti-inflammatory B cells in patients with SLE," Mauri said. RELATED: What Is Lupus, and How Do I know if I Have It? Right now, a number of drugs are used to treat lupus, including immune-system suppressors such as cyclophosphamide and tacrolimus, and anti-malaria drugs like hydroxychloroquine -- which can ease the fatigue, joint pain and skin rash that lupus commonly causes, according to the Lupus Foundation of America. In some cases, doctors try a drug called rituximab, an IV medication designed to kill off certain B cells. Rituximab is approved to treat certain cancers and rheumatoid arthritis -- another autoimmune disease; but some lupus patients respond to the medication, too, the study authors said. It's been unclear, though, why only certain lupus patients see benefits from rituximab, according to the researchers. Mauri said the new findings suggest a reason. People's response to rituximab may depend on whether they have normal activity in two genes related to interferon-alpha. That, Mauri said, suggests that lupus patients should have gene testing before they're placed on rituximab. But, she stressed, "long-term studies -- where patients get tested before, during and after treatment -- are needed to prove that hypothesis unequivocally." A rheumatologist who was not involved in the study agreed. "At this point, more work is needed, including looking at feasibility and cost issues," said Dr. Rosalind Ramsey-Goldman, a professor of medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, in Chicago. Ramsey-Goldman also agreed that the findings could eventually lead to new therapies, or point researchers in the direction of existing drugs for other conditions that could be "repurposed" to fight lupus. The findings are based on blood samples from nearly 100 healthy volunteers and 200 people with lupus. Mauri's team found that lupus patients seemed to have an imbalance among three types of immune cells: B cells that produce antibodies; B cells that regulate inflammation; and cells that produce interferon-alpha. Essentially, there is a lack of anti-inflammatory B cells, which leads to overproduction of interferon-alpha. That, in turn, boosts that number of antibody-producing B cells, the study found. The root cause of it all remains a mystery, however, Mauri said. And not all lupus patients would have this particular abnormality, according to Ramsey-Goldman. "SLE is probably a syndrome with multiple different immune system abnormalities," she said. In general, Ramsey-Goldman explained, lupus is thought to arise from a combination of genetic susceptibility to autoimmune diseases and certain environmental factors. Researchers still don't know what those factors are. But the suspects include certain infections, such as the Epstein-Barr virus, and on-the-job exposure to silica dust, according to the Lupus Foundation of America. Copyright @ 2015 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
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Indian-American scientist discovers 10 new lupus genes

Indian-American scientist discovers 10 new lupus genes | lupus awareness | Scoop.it
An international team led by an Indian-American scientist has identified 10 new genes associated with the autoimmune disease lupus.
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Researchers discover ten new lupus genes in Asian population study

Researchers discover ten new lupus genes in Asian population study | lupus awareness | Scoop.it

An international coalition of researchers led by Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientist Swapan Nath, Ph.D., has identified 10 new genes associated with the autoimmune disease lupus. The findings were published in ...

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How Alzheimer's destroys the brain - CNN Video

How Alzheimer's destroys the brain - CNN Video | lupus awareness | Scoop.it

Dr. Sanjay Gupta compares a healthy human brain to one affected by Alzheimer's disease.

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Positive Options for Living with Lupus: Self-Help and Treatment (Positive Options for Hea EBOOK

Positive Options for Living with Lupus: Self-Help and Treatment (Positive Options for Hea EBOOK get ...
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Ᏸ Free Download The Lupus Recovery Diet: A Natural Approach to Autoimmune Disease That Reall EBOOK

http://book99download.com/readbook.php?asin=0975870718.html Ᏸ Free Download The Lupus Recovery Diet: A Natural Approach to Autoimmune Disease ...
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2016 Walk with Us to Cure Lupus T-shirt Design Contest Winner!

And the winner is... Sasheer Zamata is back to announce the winner of the 2016 Alliance for Lupus Research Walk with Us to Cure Lupus T-shirt Design Contest ...
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At Home Care Can Greatly Benefit Those Living With Lupus | Best Home Care MN

At Home Care Can Greatly Benefit Those Living With Lupus | Best Home Care MN | lupus awareness | Scoop.it
See how in home supportive services from a personal care assistant can help those living with lupus live independently and manage the impact of flare ups.
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In-depth: Pharma’s digital health initiatives move into commercialization

In-depth: Pharma’s digital health initiatives move into commercialization | lupus awareness | Scoop.it
More and more, pharma companies are making real bets in digital health, and reorganizing their businesses to put some power behind those efforts. The space is, in some ways, quieter than it was this time last year, but there’s reason to believe that quiet is a calm before a storm of activity, driven more by pharma’s tendency to keep early-stage projects close to the chest than by a lack of activity.
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Lymphatic System: Facts, Functions & Diseases

Lymphatic System: Facts, Functions & Diseases | lupus awareness | Scoop.it
The lymphatic system helps rid the body of toxins. It transports white blood cells throughout the body to fight infection.
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7 Strange Things Stress Can Do to Your Body

7 Strange Things Stress Can Do to Your Body | lupus awareness | Scoop.it
Stress is part of life — and it’s not always a bad thing. Sometimes it gives you the motivation you need for hitting a deadline or performing your best. But unmanaged or prolonged stress can wreak havoc on your body, resulting in unexpected aches, pains and other symptoms. “Stress doesn’t necessarily cause certain conditions, but it can make the symptoms of those conditions worse,” says Richard Lang, MD, MPH, Chairman of Preventive Medicine and Vice Chairman of the Wellness Institute. “When physical symptoms worsen, they may in turn increase a person’s level of stress, which results in a vicious circle.” Stress can do some strange things to your body, affecting it in various places: 1. Muscles and joints Stress can cause pain, tightness or soreness in your muscles, as well as spasms of pain. It can lead to flare-ups of symptoms of arthritis, fibromyalgia and other conditions. That’s because stress lowers your threshold for pain. 2. Heart and lungs Too much of the stress hormone cortisol may make heart and lung conditions worse. These include heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure and asthma. If you have pain or tightness in your chest or heart palpitations, see a doctor as soon as possible to rule out a serious condition. 3. Skin and hair If you have a skin condition such as eczema, rosacea or psoriasis, stress can make it worse. It also can lead to hives and itchiness, excessive sweating and even hair loss. 4. Gut Stress really shows in your digestive system — from simpler symptoms such as pain, gas, diarrhea and constipation to more complex conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome and acid reflux (GERD). 5. Shoulders, head and jaw Doctors call this the “tension triangle.” Stress can trigger tension headaches, tightness in the neck and jaw, and knots and spasms in your neck and shoulders. It also may contribute to TMJ, a jaw disorder. RELATED: Your Jaw May Be to Blame for Your Migraine Headaches 6. Immune system You need a strong immune system to fight disease, but stress weakens your body’s defenses. It makes you more likely to catch colds or the flu, for example. It also may make autoimmune conditions such as lupus and inflammatory bowel disease worse. 7. Mental health Stress can bring on symptoms of depression and reduce your enthusiasm for activities you usually enjoy — from everyday hobbies to sex. People also tend to eat poorly and exercise less when stressed, which only makes symptoms stronger. Feeling down in the dumps because of stress is not a personal failing. It happens to most of us, so don’t be afraid to reach out for help. “We can treat the symptoms,” Dr. Lang says, “but the real key is to find and treat the cause of the problem.” RELATED: 5 Reasons You Shouldn’t Ignore Your Mental Health
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Curing Lyme disease – Causes and solutions

Curing Lyme disease – Causes and solutions | lupus awareness | Scoop.it
(NaturalHealth365) Although about 30,000 cases of Lyme disease are reported in the U.S. each year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention acknowledges the number of actual cases is about 10 times that. Unfortunately, the usual course of treatment – antibiotics – has proven ineffective. But Dr. David Minkoff has a better solution for curing Lyme disease that builds up the immune system rather than tearing it down! Know the effective ways to diagnose and treat Lyme disease today. On the next NaturalHealth365 Talk Hour, Jonathan Landsman and Dr. David Minkoff discuss the symptoms of Lyme disease, plus, a treatment plan that’s more effective than the antibiotic regimen promoted by Western medicine. Join us for a show filled with surprising facts about this debilitating condition – and come away with practical, life-changing advice about how to diminish its effects. Simply sign up now for access to our free, weekly show by entering your email address and you’ll receive show times plus FREE gifts! Lyme disease: Choosing the pathway to an effective cure The symptoms of early Lyme disease vary, but often include flu-like symptoms of fever, chills, sweats, muscle aches, fatigue, nausea and joint pain. Conventional medicine takes a single path to treatment: antibiotics. Yet, chronic Lyme disease patients continue to suffer, despite aggressive rounds of antibiotics. The disease is known to be an underlying cause of many other health problems including ALS, Lupus, Parkinson’s Disease and Rheumatoid Arthritis. (to name a few) Rather than treating with antibiotics, Dr. Minkoff’s clinic focuses on rebuilding the immune system so that body can respond by targeting the infection. In many cases, ‘natural antibiotics,’ such as ozone or hydrogen peroxide, prove to be quite effective – but, a comprehensive program is essential for removing chronic Lyme disease symptoms. Find out how to reverse the debilitating effects of Lyme disease. Join us for the next NaturalHealth365 Talk Hour with Jonathan Landsman and Dr. David Minkoff, an alternative medicine and infectious disease expert. Discover the signs of this widespread condition and the effective, natural means of treating Lyme disease without antibiotics. Simply sign up now for access to our free, weekly show by entering your email address and you’ll receive show times plus FREE gifts! 7 ways ozone therapy heals Lyme disease patients There are a number of ways to effectively treat Lyme disease without poisoning the body with toxic drugs, but Dr. Minkoff says his clinic believes the best all-around treatment for this condition must include ozone therapy. Why? Ozone therapy increases the amount of oxygen in the body, contributing to recovery from Lyme disease by: 1. Detoxifying the liver 2. Decreasing uric acid levels in the body 3. “De-clogging” blood cells 4. Improving circulation 5. Killing fungi, viruses and bacteria 6. Improving cellular metabolism 7. Enhancing the immune system Join us for an important program that will show you how to identify symptoms of Lyme disease, including secondary conditions, along with a proven, natural strategy for treatment. This week’s guest: Dr. David Minkoff, an integrative medical doctor and infectious disease expert Discover antibiotic alternatives for treating Lyme disease and how to reverse its harmful effects without antibiotics – Sun. March 20 In 1997, Dr. Minkoff, M.D., co-founded LifeWorks Wellness Center, one of the country’s foremost alternative health clinics. In 2000, Dr. Minkoff launched BodyHealth, a nutrition company offering a unique array of dietary supplements to the public and practitioners. After more than 20 years in conventional medicine, his wife’s unexplained illness in 1995 led him to alternative and complementary medicine in search of answers. His journey not only resulted in his wife’s return to health, but provided him with expertise in biological medicine, heavy metal detoxification, anti-aging medicine, functional medicine, energy medicine, neural and prolotherapy, homeopathy and nutrition. About the author: Jonathan Landsman is the host of NaturalHealth365.com, the NaturalHealth365 Talk Hour – a free, weekly health show and the NaturalHealth365 INNER CIRCLE – a monthly subscription to the brightest minds in natural health and healing. Reaching hundreds of thousands of people, worldwide, as a personal health consultant, writer and radio talk show host – Jonathan has been educating the public on the health benefits of an organic (non-GMO) diet along with high-quality supplementation and healthy lifestyle habits including exercise and meditation.
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Health Minute: Lupus - DirectorsTalk

Health Minute: Lupus - DirectorsTalk | lupus awareness | Scoop.it
Lupus is a common disease that can be life-changing for people who are diagnosed with it. Women are 10 times more likely to have lupus than men. The onset of lupus typically occurs in people who are in their 20s and 30s and is more common in certain ethnic groups, according to the American College ...
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Diets for Lupus Patients

Diets for Lupus Patients | lupus awareness | Scoop.it

Includes: dietary changes for lupus patients, alternative possibilities, implementing dietary changes, and which diet is best?.

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Caring for Someone With Alzheimers - Professional Caregiver Webinar

Alzheimer's disease and other dementias present unique caregiving challenges This web seminar offers approaches for how to care for people with Alzheimer's ...

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WEBINAR: Living Well with Lupus as a Youth

Approximately 20 percent of people living with lupus are diagnosed in their childhood. Being a youth with lupus can be challenging, to say the least.
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Managing Lupus Symptoms With Diet

This free webinar for anyone suffering from Lupus or other autoimmune conditions. I will discuss what you need to know to help manage symptoms from these ...
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Foundation calls for more research on lupus - Jamaica Gleaner

Foundation calls for more research on lupus - Jamaica Gleaner | lupus awareness | Scoop.it
The paucity of data on the presentation, treatment and care of lupus in Jamaica is making it difficult for doctors to effectively deliver care to patients.It is against this backdrop that members of the Lupus Foundation, who were guests at a...
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