Love of Geography
313 views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Kevin Barker from Geography Education
onto Love of Geography
Scoop.it!

Why Paris doesn't want a Scottish Yes

Why Paris doesn't want a Scottish Yes | Love of Geography | Scoop.it

"Nothing unites different nations quite like mutual enemies. But the 'Auld Alliance' between Scotland and France - both historic rivals of England - doesn't mean that the French government favours Scottish independence. Far from it."


Via Seth Dixon
Kevin Barker's insight:

I was surprised to listen to the affection that Scotland and France have towards each other but I wasn't surprised to hear France's concerns about the further division of countries within the EU.  What is it about the independence of Scotland that causes the French government to be concerned?

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 18, 2014 11:50 AM

Historically, France has supported greater autonomy or independence as a way to limit English political power and influence.  However in the era of the E.U. and greater regional integration, modern geopolitics makes this old alliance untenable as some in Scotland are seeking independence from the United Kingdom.  

 

Tags: devolutionhistorical, supranationalism, political, states, sovereignty, autonomy, Europe, unit 4 political, geopolitics.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 3:30 PM

APHG-Unit 4

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 2014 1:50 PM

Even though in past years France and Scotland have been friendly and wanted the best for each other, Scottish independence is not on the list of things to do for France.  They have good blood together, sharing foods, music and alcohol at festivals there is no need to worry about any hatred happening even if the French does not back Scotland's independence.  While some think that France would think that areas like Brittany and Corsica would want independence from France that is not the reason.  To keep checks and balances in place a strong United Kingdom is needed to keep Germany in line.  With the independence of Scotland, the UK gets a little bit weaker and France is not okay with that.

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Kevin Barker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

10 countries that desperately want people to have more sex

10 countries that desperately want people to have more sex | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
Roughly half the countries around the world experience low fertility rates, and some get pretty creative in how they encourage procreation.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, September 7, 7:23 AM
Seth Dixon's insight: While many countries have anti-natalist policies (policies to discourage more births), other countries with declining populations have pro-natalist policies in an attempt to increase fertility rates. While not an exhaustive list, this list gives a few more examples that teachers can use to show how countries in stage 4 of the demographic transition are dealing with declining fertility rates. Denmark Russia Japan Romania Singapore South Korea India (Parsis community) Italy Hong Kong Spain
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 8:55 PM

While many countries have anti-natalist policies (policies to discourage more births), other countries with declining populations have pro-natalist policies in an attempt to increase fertility rates.  While not an exhaustive list, this list gives a few more examples that teachers can use to show how countries in stage 4 of the demographic transition are dealing with declining fertility rates.  

 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

Ms. Amanda Fairchild's curator insight, October 16, 1:21 PM
Examples of pro-natalist countries.
Rescooped by Kevin Barker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Enclaves & Exclaves

Enclaves & Exclaves | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
A tour of the world's engulfed and orphaned places.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mr Mac's curator insight, July 3, 12:08 PM
Unit 1 - Mapping; Unit 3/4 - Ethnic Enclaves and Exclaves 
Allison Anthony's curator insight, July 5, 6:08 PM

Political geography 

Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 9:01 PM

This storymap is a full length article about all the intricacies about enclaves and exclaves, but the interactive format, visuals and maps really make this much more than another article on the topic.    

 

Tags: borders, political, mappingESRIStoryMap.

Scooped by Kevin Barker
Scoop.it!

3 maps that explain the geopolitics of nuclear weapons

3 maps that explain the geopolitics of nuclear weapons | Love of Geography | Scoop.it

"Nuclear bombs are in their own category of weapon. They are useful in that they deter aggression."

The contemporary map of nuclear arms is dominated by the U.S. and Russia and then includes a handful of seemingly random countries.


Given different circumstances, there could be many more countries that have nuclear weapons today.  What is really interesting are the various reasons that countries don't have weapons.


So why would a country not develop a nuclear weapons program despite the technological know-how?



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kevin Barker
Scoop.it!

The Dallas Suburbs Funding the Most Expensive High School Football Stadiums in the World

The Dallas Suburbs Funding the Most Expensive High School Football Stadiums in the World | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
Why are these Dallas suburbs funding the most expensive high school football stadiums ever built?
Kevin Barker's insight:
This isn't just a North Dallas story. As always, spending on one thing means not spending on something else. At the same time, regardless of size, stadiums will be built. At what point is this getting carried away? What are the forces leading to these decisions?
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kevin Barker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Special Economic Zones

Special Economic Zones | Love of Geography | Scoop.it

"Special Economic Zones (SEZs) are the most rapidly spreading kind of city, having catapulted exports and growth from Mauritius and the Dominican Republic to Shenzhen and Dubai -- and now across Africa. Today more than 4000 SEZs dot the planet, a major indication of our transition towards the "supply chain world" explored in Connectography.  See more maps from Connectography and order the book here."

 

Tags: globalization, urban, economic, industry, regions.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rescooped by Kevin Barker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Staggering Wealth Of Mexico City

The Staggering Wealth Of Mexico City | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
Walk on the streets and you´ll be exposed to its informal economy: people who do what they can to eke out a living including washing windshields, selling food, or even singing, dancing, and performing acrobatics for a tip.

What Americans may not know is that Mexico City is home to the wealthiest people, the poshest neighborhoods, the most exclusive shops, entertainment venues, and cultural centers on the planet.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 1, 2016 12:57 PM

Mexico City has been the economic center of Mexico for a long time and is a true primate city. "Wealth accumulation in Mexico City has historically been concentrated in the hands of a few. In colonial times, the elite was mostly composed of Spanish-born immigrants who held high-ranking offices or worked as business owners or export-oriented merchants. Later, the wealthy were those who owned large estates known as haciendas…It is estimated that around 40 percent of Mexico’s income is owned by just 10 percent of its population, while 52.3 percent of Mexican citizens live in poverty."

 

Tags: urban, megacitieseconomic, labor, Mexico.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 30, 2016 8:13 PM

Contrasts found in large cities 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 22, 11:08 AM
unit 6 and 7
Rescooped by Kevin Barker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

These Maps Show How Vast New Infrastructure Is Bringing the World Together

These Maps Show How Vast New Infrastructure Is Bringing the World Together | Love of Geography | Scoop.it

"If you want to understand the world of tomorrow, why not just look at a good map? For my (Parag Khanna) new book, Connectography, I researched every single significant cross-border infrastructure project linking countries together on every continent. I worked with the world’s leading cartography labs to literally map out what the future actually — physically — will look like.

It turns out that what most defines the emerging world is not fragmentation of countries but integration within regions. The same world that appears to be falling apart is actually coming together in much more concrete ways than today’s political maps suggest. Major world regions are forging dense infrastructural connectivity and reorienting their relations around supply chains rather than borders."

 

Tags: regions, map.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kevin Barker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

xkcd: Map Age Guide

xkcd: Map Age Guide | Love of Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 30, 2016 2:17 PM

I was riding my bike during Labor Day weekend and chanced upon a yard sale with an old globe going for $4 (of course I bought it and rode home one-handed).  There were some clues that it wasn't a recent globe (The Soviet Union and Yugoslavia still existed and Burkina Faso was labeled Upper Volta and Zimbabwe was listed as Rhodesia). I knew that if I wanted to know what year this globe was produced, I would need this XKCD guide. XKCD is a comic strip that deals with many intellectual issues, but it can also be a wealth of quality scientific information.  This infographic (hi-res) is amazingly useful if you are trying to find the map of an undated map, but the flow chart also is a wealth of global history and moments that 'changed the map.'

 

Tags: XKCD, artinfographic, mapping, trivia, cartography.

Rescooped by Kevin Barker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why Italy’s 'Fertility Day' is backfiring

Why Italy’s 'Fertility Day' is backfiring | Love of Geography | Scoop.it

"Facing a low fertility rate (1.4), Italy is holding its first 'Fertility Day' on Sept. 22, which will emphasize 'the beauty of motherhood and fatherhood' and host roundtable discussions on fertility and reproductive health. That may seem inoffensive, but the country’s health department is trying to raise awareness with an ad campaign that’s striking many as misguided and, worse, sexist and alarmist."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 2, 2016 8:47 AM

This pro-natalist campaign designed by the health ministry has received near universal criticism (in an attempt to see other perspectives, I searched for a more positive or even neutral article on the topic and came up empty-handed).  Italy's Prime Minister openly scoffed at the premise of the campaign, and many pundits argue that it shames and pressures women into thinking about personal choices of childbearing as if they were communal responsibilities.  Unlike the infamous 'Do it For Denmark' advertisements that were filled with playful innuendos, or Singapore's 'Maybe Baby' which highlights the joys of parenthood, this one has more overtones of duty and plays on fear more than those other pro-natalist campaigns.      

 

Tags:  ItalyEurope, declining populations, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 5, 2016 7:28 AM
Preliminary - population
Scooped by Kevin Barker
Scoop.it!

The Ugly Story of South Dallas

The Ugly Story of South Dallas | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
A new documentary explores the history of segregation, discriminatory policies, and racially motivated bombings that shaped two neighborhoods.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kevin Barker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

This map should change the way you think about foreign aid

This map should change the way you think about foreign aid | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
As you can see, the biggest recipient by a long way is Israel (this is fiscal year 2014 data, but nothing's changing), and two other big ones are Egypt and Jordan, which both have aid packages that are tied up with their peace treaties with Israel. None of these are poor countries (indeed, Israel is downright rich), and the point of the money is to advance an American foreign policy agenda — not to help the poor. Pakistan and Afghanistan, which round out the top five, actually are pretty poor, but, again, the main American interest in them is clearly foreign policy rather than poverty.

 

Tags: political, geopolitics, development, economic.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
lpatteson's curator insight, March 23, 2016 1:01 PM
I wonder what this would look like if it were a map of the US's federal aid to the 50 states.
Rescooped by Kevin Barker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Walk Appeal and Public Health

Walk Appeal and Public Health | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
"The core idea of Walk Appeal is that people walk longest and most often in places that entice them, but rarely walk just because they’re told they ought to. Some Walk Appeal factors are measurable, while others are immeasurable, and it has long been clear that Walk Appeal is the best predictor of the viability of neighborhood businesses."

Via Seth Dixon
Kevin Barker's insight:

What is a reasonable distance to walk around town?  Research shows that cities with improved sidewalks, less parking lots, attractive storefronts and other amenities that encourage walking.  If  walking the urban environment is and of itself an experience worth having and makes the person feel like a flâneur, experiencing the city on a deeper level, automotive transport goes down and walking goes up.  Urban infrastructure is more important for most people than distance in deciding whether to get in the car or walk down the street (for distances under 2 miles).   Bottom line: neighborhoods that have an appealing sense of place are more walkable.

 

Tags: urban, place, transportation, planning, urbanism, architecture.

more...
Jessica Ruddy's curator insight, March 21, 2016 10:58 AM

What is a reasonable distance to walk around town?  Research shows that cities with improved sidewalks, less parking lots, attractive storefronts and other amenities that encourage walking.  If  walking the urban environment is and of itself an experience worth having and makes the person feel like a flâneur, experiencing the city on a deeper level, automotive transport goes down and walking goes up.  Urban infrastructure is more important for most people than distance in deciding whether to get in the car or walk down the street (for distances under 2 miles).   Bottom line: neighborhoods that have an appealing sense of place are more walkable.

 

Tags: urban, place, transportation, planning, urbanism, architecture.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, April 16, 2016 1:21 AM

The concepts of "liveable streets" and "placemaking" can enhance the liveability of places.

Read about " Eyes on the street" and " broken window theory",  "walkability", "green infrastructure"  and " 20 minute neighbourhoods" and orher strategies to enhance liveability in

 

Geoworld 7 NSW 

10.3 Creating better communities

10..4 Places for people

10.5 Liveable streets 

10.6 Green places and open spaces

Geothink: Attributes of a liveable place;  New transport hierarchy; Planning liveable places

Kristina Lemson's curator insight, April 16, 2016 10:44 PM
Use Google Earth to examine the walkability of Banksia Grove. Can younidentify specific elements that look like they have been included to meet this aim? Conversely, what mitigates against people walking in BG?
Rescooped by Kevin Barker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

AAG's Interactive Modules

AAG's Interactive Modules | Love of Geography | Scoop.it

"Each module consists of a conceptual framework and case studies. The conceptual framework introduces students to some of the key concepts, theories, and analytical approaches in geography. The conceptual framework provides students with the background they need to think geographically about global issues. The case studies illustrate how geographic concepts, methods, and technologies can be used to investigate and solve problems in different places and countries."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 23, 2016 12:32 PM

These 6 interactive modules from the AAG are an untapped treasure trove of resources; they make geographic methods/content relevant using a wide range of global case studies.  Each of these modules has been aligned with the APHG curriculum and can be adapted to a wide range of applications.  This is definitely on the shortlist of the best resources that I've shared over the years.  


TagsAAG, APHG, edtech.


Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 26, 2016 8:20 AM

Great case studies that can be used to understand and apply the 4 geographic critical thinking concepts in Ontario's Geography curriculum. The geographic critical thinking (the "How" we think) concepts are: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends, Interrelationships and Geographic Perspective.

Dewayne Goad's curator insight, March 9, 2016 9:41 AM

These 6 interactive modules from the AAG are an untapped treasure trove of resources; they make geographic methods/content relevant using a wide range of global case studies.  Each of these modules has been aligned with the APHG curriculum and can be adapted to a wide range of applications.  This is definitely on the shortlist of the best resources that I've shared over the years.  


Tags: AAG, APHG, edtech.


Scooped by Kevin Barker
Scoop.it!

Radio Garden

Radio Garden | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
Explore live radio by rotating the globe.
Kevin Barker's insight:
Radio Garden allows listeners to explore processes of broadcasting and hearing identities across the entire globe. 

From its very beginning, radio signals have crossed borders. Radio makers and listeners have imagined both connecting with distant cultures, as well as re-connecting with people from ‘home’ from thousands of miles away – or using local community radio to make and enrich new homes. 

In the section Live, you can explore a world or radio as it is happening right now. Tune into any place on the globe: what sounds familiar? What sounds foreign? Where would you like to travel and what sounds like ‘home’? 
 In the section on History you can tune into clips from throughout radio history that show how radio has tried to cross borders. How have people tried to translate their nations into the airwaves? What did they say to the world? How do they engage in conversation across linguistic and geographical barriers? 

Click over to Jingles for a world-wide crash course in station identification. How do stations signal within a fraction of a second what kind of programmes you are likely to hear? How do they project being joyful, trustworthy, or up to the minute? Then stop and listen to radio Stories where listeners past and present tell how they listen beyond their walls. How do they imagine the voices and sounds from around the globe? How do they use radio to make themselves at home in the world? 
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kevin Barker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After Century of Electric Production

World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After Century of Electric Production | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
The last section of dam is being blasted from the Elwha River on Washington's Olympic Peninsula on Tuesday.


For almost half a century, the two dams were widely applauded for powering the growth of the peninsula and its primary industry. But the dams blocked salmon migration up the Elwha, devastating its fish and shellfish—and the livelihood of the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe. As the tribe slowly gained political power—it won federal recognition in 1968—it and other tribes began to protest the loss of the fishing rights promised to them by federal treaty in the mid-1800s. In 1979, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Washington tribes, including the Elwha Klallam, were entitled to half the salmon catch in the state.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 2014 1:16 PM

See also this video to see the rapid changes on the nearby White Salmon River when they removed the dam. 


Tags: biogeography, environment, land use, sustainability, environment adapt.

Scooped by Kevin Barker
Scoop.it!

For Years, I've Been A Correspondent In China. This Month, I Became A Viral Star

For Years, I've Been A Correspondent In China. This Month, I Became A Viral Star | Love of Geography | Scoop.it

A video of NPR Beijing correspondent Anthony Kuhn asking a question about a policy to expand the Beijing region got millions of views on Weibo, China's answer to Twitter. Here's why. 


During a press conference in China, a seemingly innocuous question was posed to the government by a western reporter.  What made this get so much attention is fascinating in all it reveals about the competing forces in China today.  Media and Government.  English and Chinese.  Urban and rural.  Communism and capitalism.  

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kevin Barker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What can I do with a Geography Degree?

What can I do with a Geography Degree? | Love of Geography | Scoop.it

"While it is easy to understand getting excited about maps, different cultures and environments, and even being better citizens through geography, it is harder to see how geographic knowledge can lead to good jobs or meaningful careers. In recent years, people have discovered that large numbers of societal problems have geographic dimensions, and that education and training in geography provides essential skills and knowledge for real-world problem solving. As a result, geography has become a necessary ingredient in hundreds of different jobs. This assortment of careers helps demonstrate the wide array of employment opportunities that exist for graduates with education in the field of geography. Within this publication, careers are divided into a number of different employment categories, including:

​Geography EducationEnvironmental GeographyGeospatial TechnologiesLand Use Planning
Via Seth Dixon
more...
Sally Egan's curator insight, February 7, 7:48 PM
Great for introducing the vocational relevance of geography.
Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 15, 3:04 PM
Geographic Concepts: Geographic Perspective and Geographic Skills And Careers
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, February 27, 10:36 AM
what can i do with a degree in geography? ALOT!
Rescooped by Kevin Barker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The languages the world is trying to learn, according to Duolingo

The languages the world is trying to learn, according to Duolingo | Love of Geography | Scoop.it

If you own a smartphone and are trying to learn a language, you probably have Duolingo. English is far and away the most dominant, with a caveat: For some learners, English is the only language Duolingo offers with translation into their native tongue. That doesn’t change the fact of universal interest in English, though, which Duolingo notes is studied by 53% of its users. Things get more interesting when you look at the second-most popular language by country. There French takes the lead, followed by Spanish, German, and Portuguese.

 

Tags: language, colonialism, technology, diffusion, culture, English.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Madison Murphy's curator insight, March 13, 3:15 PM
This article "The Languages The World Is Trying To Learn, According To Duolingo" relates to language in Human Geography because it is an app that describes how languages are being spread but also how countries are picking a certain language to be able to communicate with, which is English.  Countries are picking English because they are needing a language to be able to communicate with other countries.
Hailey Austin's curator insight, March 13, 8:45 PM
This reflects to what we are learning in  class because  the articles talking about language. It's talking about how we all really have one language in come in all around the world. I think this is a good idea to have when your working with other countries or you are visiting them.
Hailey Austin's curator insight, April 6, 3:09 PM
This relates to my class because its talking about religion. It states that in many different parts in the world it is very dominate  to learn English. But whats more interesting is that French is right after us. It talks about why English is so popular. Which is because its a language you can use when you visit places and you will be able to communicate. I think this article is interesting  because it is talking about how we are the most popular language but its one of the most complicated one to learn. I also would understand why English is most learned because a lot of people want to visit Florida or even move their.
Rescooped by Kevin Barker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Japan forces a harsh choice on children of migrant families

Japan forces a harsh choice on children of migrant families | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
Born in Japan, Gursewak Singh considers himself Japanese. The government doesn't. But it offers children like him a chance to stay - if their parents leave.

 

Gursewak’s parents, who are Sikhs, fled to Japan from India in the 1990s. For several years, they lived without visas under the radar of the authorities until they were put on a status known as “provisional release” in 2001. It means they can stay in Japan as long as their asylum application is under review.  While there were almost 14,000 asylum cases under review at the end of 2015, Japan accepted only 27 refugees last year. The year before that, the number was 11.

The low acceptance rate stands in stark contrast to Europe, which has seen hundreds of thousands of refugees arrive from countries such as Iraq, Syria and Eritrea. In the first half of the year, European countries ruled on 495,000 asylum applications, approving more than 293,000.

 

Tags: culture, Sikh, declining population, population, migration, refugees, Japan, East Asia,             .


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kevin Barker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Portraits Of NYC Immigrants Reveal Cultural Backgrounds

Portraits Of NYC Immigrants Reveal Cultural Backgrounds | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
Here are just a handful of the 12 million men, women, and children who arrived at Ellis Island, New York, between 1892 and 1954 to start a new life in the USA, often dressed in their finest clothes. The portraits show immigrants wearing the national dress of their country of origin, including military uniforms from Albania, bonnets from the Netherlands, and clothing of Sámi people from the Arctic regions.

The photographs were taken between 1906 and 1914 by amateur photographer Augustus Francis Sherman, the chief registry clerk at Ellis Island, then the country’s busiest immigration station. In 1907 some of the photos were published by National Geographic.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 2, 2016 11:26 AM

These images show some of the diverse cultural backgrounds of turn-of-the-century American immigrants.  The formal clothing that represents the folk cultures that they came from hint at the massive cultural shift that these immigrants must have experienced upon arriving to the United States.  These photos of migrants wearing clothing representing their Old World lives right as they are about to culturally assimilate (or acculturate) into the New World are pictures I find quite poignant and personal.    

 

Tagsculturemigrationhistorical, folk culturesethnicity, unit 3 culture.

16s3d's curator insight, October 21, 2016 2:06 AM
Les couleurs révélées de la diversité des immigrants aux États-Unis entre 1906 et 1914
Rescooped by Kevin Barker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

All Maps Are Biased. Google Maps’ New Redesign Doesn’t Hide It.

All Maps Are Biased. Google Maps’ New Redesign Doesn’t Hide It. | Love of Geography | Scoop.it

"Google rolled out its new Maps design...from a navigational tool to a commercial interface and offers the clearest proof yet that the geographic web—despite its aspirations to universality—is a deeply subjective entity."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 5, 2016 11:43 AM

Google Maps was updated over the summer, and the updates don't make them more impartial, but that isn't a bad thing.  Google Maps now highlight 'Areas of interest,' which are created with algorithms designed to reveal the “highest concentration of restaurants, bars, and shops.” The algorithms aren't 'objective,' but are fine-tuned by human engineers to reflect what they consider 'Areas of Interests' should look like.  Maps are never as objective as they appear to be, and that can often be a great thing. 

 

Tags: google, mapping, geospatial, cartography, visualization.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, September 6, 2016 9:30 AM
All maps are biased because they are not the territory, but represent our subjective view of the territory; what we include and what we leave out depends on what we deem important, or not. Europe is still oversized in most current maps in relation to the "Third World." What is the new politically correct fad?
Rescooped by Kevin Barker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Travel speeds in the U.S. in the 1800s

Travel speeds in the U.S. in the 1800s | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
Maps from the 1932 Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States put travel in the 1800s into perspective.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 2015 1:02 PM

unit 1

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 14, 2015 4:05 PM

This series of maps shows the great leaps and bounds that were made during the 19th century in transportation technology in the United States.  This impacted population settlement, economic interactions and functionally made the great distances seem smaller.  This is what many call the time-space compression; the friction of distance is diminished as communication and transportation technologies improve.  


Questions to Ponder: When someone says they live "10 minutes away," what does that say about how we think about distance, transportation infrastructure and time?  How is geography still relevant in a world where distance appears to becoming less of a factor?  

 

Tags: transportation, modelsdiffusion, globalization, diffusion, time-space.

Erik Glitman's curator insight, September 18, 2015 11:39 AM

Comparing how long it took to travel even 150 years ago opens up a question on trust. At that time, checking accounts were rare, credit cards non-existent, and every one had to travel with cash. Yet, incidents of robbery were uncommon and trust in the stranger was high. Now travel takes a small fraction of the time it did 150 years ago and strangers are seen as a threat. Trust has eroded, but is it a fear based or fact based erosion?  Is travel less safe now than it was in the 1860's?

Scooped by Kevin Barker
Scoop.it!

Cities are the New Nations

Cities are the New Nations | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
“Political geography is not determinant anymore, because cities are more important.”
Kevin Barker's insight:
Cities are the new countries.  This idea is getting a lot of attention as large urban centers are increasingly seen as the real power brokers of the world.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kevin Barker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Total Fertility Rates, 1950 and 2015

Total Fertility Rates, 1950 and 2015 | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
It is quite significant that extremely high fertility figures are now mostly confined to tropical Africa, with only a few exceptions (such as Afghanistan and East Timor).

Via Seth Dixon
Kevin Barker's insight:

In the decades after 1950, less developed countries were characterized as having very high fertility rates and that was (by and large) an accurate statement.  While the highest birth rates are still in less developed economies, it is important to note that the subjective scale is changing; while over 8 was once uncommonly high, now over 5 is as comparably uncommon a fertility rate as 8 used to be.  This still signals global population growth, but the idea that the 'less developed world' hasn't adopted birth control or other measures to slow population growth is outdated.   

 

Tag: declining populations, population, demographics, unit 2 population.

more...
Jean-Michel Crosnier's curator insight, March 21, 2016 11:25 AM

In the decades after 1950, less developed countries were characterized as having very high fertility rates and that was (by and large) an accurate statement.  While the highest birth rates are still in less developed economies, it is important to note that the subjective scale is changing; while over 8 was once uncommonly high, now over 5 is as comparably uncommon a fertility rate as 8 used to be.  This still signals global population growth, but the idea that the 'less developed world' hasn't adopted birth control or other measures to slow population growth is outdated.   

 

Tag: declining populations, population, demographics, unit 2 population.

Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, March 28, 2016 10:52 AM

In the decades after 1950, less developed countries were characterized as having very high fertility rates and that was (by and large) an accurate statement.  While the highest birth rates are still in less developed economies, it is important to note that the subjective scale is changing; while over 8 was once uncommonly high, now over 5 is as comparably uncommon a fertility rate as 8 used to be.  This still signals global population growth, but the idea that the 'less developed world' hasn't adopted birth control or other measures to slow population growth is outdated.   

 

Tag: declining populations, population, demographics, unit 2 population.

MsPerry's curator insight, March 31, 2016 12:58 PM

In the decades after 1950, less developed countries were characterized as having very high fertility rates and that was (by and large) an accurate statement.  While the highest birth rates are still in less developed economies, it is important to note that the subjective scale is changing; while over 8 was once uncommonly high, now over 5 is as comparably uncommon a fertility rate as 8 used to be.  This still signals global population growth, but the idea that the 'less developed world' hasn't adopted birth control or other measures to slow population growth is outdated.   

 

Tag: declining populations, population, demographics, unit 2 population.

Rescooped by Kevin Barker from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Introduction to Human Geography: A Disciplinary Approach

Introduction to Human Geography: A Disciplinary Approach | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
This website serves as an off-campus host for text, images, data and other web-based resources associated with the free eText, Introduction to Human Geography: A Disciplinary Approach.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 12, 2015 4:58 PM

I'm very excited to see a free eText in Human Geography.  I will be looking at this more closely during the next semester and think that geography teachers will see this as a welcome supplemental to their arsenal of resources. This is definitely on the shortlist of best materials on this site.   


Tags: geography educationAPHG, textbook.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, August 13, 2015 7:24 AM

Human Geography

Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, August 13, 2015 8:52 AM

Gracias a Seth Dixon accedo a este texto de acceso libre que es una interesante Introducción a la Geografía Humana. De fácil navegación se puede acceder a valiosa información textual, a imágenes, datos y otros recursos. Es un producto de Steven Graves, profesor de geografía en California State University, Northridge.