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The Truth About Unemployment

Stop worrying about outsourcing. Start planning for automation. WEBSITE: http://futurism.com FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/futurism TWITTER
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Our ancestors mated with the mystery 'Denisovan' people – twice

Our ancestors mated with the mystery 'Denisovan' people – twice | Love | Scoop.it
The genes of extinct hominins called Denisovans live on in people from China and Papua New Guinea, suggesting two instances of cross-species breeding
Via Levin Chin
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5 Types of Fallacies You Don't Realize You're Using in Your Writing

5 Types of Fallacies You Don't Realize You're Using in Your Writing | Love | Scoop.it
Don't be tricked by these five fallacies.
Via Levin Chin
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Calorie restriction may extend lifespan by changing your sleep

Calorie restriction may extend lifespan by changing your sleep | Love | Scoop.it
Cutting the calories you eat by 15 per cent may make you live longer – and it could be because it makes your body shut down more deeply during sleep
Via Levin Chin
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Distant galaxy with no dark matter suggests our understanding of the universe could be wrong

Distant galaxy with no dark matter suggests our understanding of the universe could be wrong | Love | Scoop.it
In a world first, astronomers have found a galaxy that lacks the enigmatic substance known as dark matter – long considered one of the universe’s fundamental building blocks. Its discovery challenges well-established ideas about how galaxies form, and the nature of dark matter itself. Located 65 million light years away, the snappily named NGC 1052-DF2 galaxy – or DF2 for short – is a “complete mystery” according to the scientists who found it.
Via Levin Chin
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The Real Causes Of Depression Have Been Discovered, And They're Not What You Think

The Real Causes Of Depression Have Been Discovered, And They're Not What You Think | Love | Scoop.it
To deal with depression, you need to deal with its underlying causes.
Via Levin Chin
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The shocking truth of Stanley Milgram's obedience experiments

The shocking truth of Stanley Milgram's obedience experiments | Love | Scoop.it
Milgram dismayed the world when he revealed how little it took to turn everyday people into torturers – but we were misled
Via Levin Chin
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Photographer Proves End of Privacy Is Here Through Photos That Will Blow Your Mind - only In Russia and China For Now

Photographer Proves End of Privacy Is Here Through Photos That Will Blow Your Mind - only In Russia and China For Now | Love | Scoop.it

Google knows what you're looking for. Facebook knows what you like. The CIA knows how to use your TV/Smartphone to spy on you. Still think you have privacy?


Via Farid Mheir
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Farid Mheir's curator insight, March 11, 2:36 PM

WHY IT MATTERS: facial recognition + social networks allow tools like this one to surface: take a picture of someone on the train and find their personal pictures on social networks. For now, only Russia and China allow this, I would expect this to be a business killer app for augmented reality glasses: the glass continuously takes pictures and overlays the LinkedIn profile of people you meet in business context. I would install that without thinking about it twice!

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Artificial Intelligence & Machine Learning: Policy Paper on key considerations regarding AI, including a set of guiding principles and recommendations #AI #Machine Learning #DigitalGovernance

Artificial Intelligence & Machine Learning: Policy Paper on key considerations regarding AI, including a set of guiding principles and recommendations #AI #Machine Learning #DigitalGovernance | Love | Scoop.it

In this paper, we seek to provide an introduction to AI to policymakers and other stakeholders in the wider Internet ecosystem.


Via Farid Mheir
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Farid Mheir's curator insight, March 11, 2:48 PM

WHY IT MATTERS: AI impact on our society will need to be regulated - the same way we have done for telecommunications, automobiles or nuclear armament. This paper presents some very interesting aspects to consider.

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10 urgent actions to take #today to remain in control of your digital life @fmheir #PrivacyAware 

10 urgent actions to take #today to remain in control of your digital life @fmheir #PrivacyAware  | Love | Scoop.it

In this post I share 10 urgent actions that must be taken immediately to manage, secure and protect your digital-moi.

Digital-moi is a unique concept that I have developed since 2013, centered on the impact that digital technologies have on our lives and the need to protect our digital self. Read more about it in this introduction post “We all have a digital twin“. This post is a complement to the conference “digital-moi.com: how to manage and protect your digital self“.


Via Farid Mheir
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Farid Mheir's curator insight, January 28, 2017 6:41 PM

This is Data Privacy Weekend and I recommend you take time this Sunday morning to read through the actions in this blog post and put at least once in practice right now - my recommendation is #4

Wo's curator insight, January 31, 2017 3:05 PM
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Hubble Measures Universe Expansion, Gets Intriguing Hints of potentially ‘New Physics’

Hubble Measures Universe Expansion, Gets Intriguing Hints of potentially ‘New Physics’ | Love | Scoop.it
A team of U.S. astronomers has used the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to make a new measurement of the Hubble constant, the rate at which the Universe is expanding. The results, to be published in the Astrophysical Journal, are forcing the scientists to consider that they may be seeing evidence of something unexpected at work in the Universe.

 

The team — led by Nobel Laureate Adam Riess, a professor of astronomy and physics at the Johns Hopkins University and a senior member of the science staff at the Space Telescope Science Institute — has been successful in refining the Hubble constant value by streamlining and strengthening the construction of the cosmic distance ladder, which astronomers use to measure accurate distances to galaxies near to and far from Earth. The astronomers have compared those distances with the expansion of space as measured by the stretching of light from receding galaxies. They then have used the apparent outward velocity of galaxies at each distance to calculate the Hubble constant. But the Hubble constant’s value is only as precise as the accuracy of the measurements.

 

Scientists cannot use a tape measure to gauge the distances between galaxies. Instead, they have selected special classes of stars and supernovae as cosmic yardsticks or milepost markers to precisely measure galactic distances. Among the most reliable for shorter distances are Cepheid variables, pulsating stars that brighten and dim at rates that correspond to their intrinsic brightness. Their distances, therefore, can be inferred by comparing their intrinsic brightness with their apparent brightness as seen from Earth.

 

The new Hubble result is based on measurements of the parallax (apparent shift of an object’s position due to a change in an observer’s point of view) of eight Cepheids in our Milky Way Galaxy. These stars are about 10 times farther away than any studied previously, residing between 6,000 light-years and 12,000 light-years from Earth, making them more challenging to measure. They pulsate at longer intervals, just like the Cepheids observed by Hubble in distant galaxies containing another reliable yardstick, exploding stars called Type Ia supernovae. This type of supernova flares with uniform brightness and is brilliant enough to be seen from relatively farther away.

 

Previous Hubble observations studied 10 faster-blinking Cepheids located 300 light-years to 1,600 light-years from Earth. To measure parallax with Hubble, Professor Riess and co-authors had to gauge the apparent tiny wobble of the Cepheids due to Earth’s motion around the Sun. These wobbles are the size of just 1/100 of a single pixel on the telescope’s camera, which is roughly the apparent size of a grain of sand seen 100 miles away.

 

Therefore, to ensure the accuracy of the measurements, they developed a clever method that was not envisioned when Hubble was launched. They invented a scanning technique in which the telescope measured a star’s position a thousand times a minute every six months for four years. The authors calibrated the true brightness of the eight Cepheids and cross-correlated them with their more distant blinking cousins to tighten the inaccuracies in their distance ladder. They then compared the brightness of the Cepheids and supernovae in those galaxies with better confidence, so they could more accurately measure the stars’ true brightness, and therefore calculate distances to hundreds of supernovae in far-flung galaxies with more precision.

 

The new value of the Hubble constant reinforces the disparity with the expected value derived from observations of the early Universe’s expansion, 378,000 years after the Big Bang — the violent event that created the Universe roughly 13.8 billion years ago. Those measurements were made by ESA’s Planck satellite, which maps the cosmic microwave background, a relic of the Big Bang. The difference between the two values is about 9%.

The new Hubble measurements help reduce the chance that the discrepancy in the values is a coincidence to 1 in 5,000.

 

Planck’s result predicted that the Hubble constant value should now be 67 km per second per megaparsec (3.3 million light-years), and could be no higher than 69 km per second per megaparsec. This means that for every 3.3 million light-years farther away a galaxy is from us, it is moving 67 km per second faster. But Professor Riess and colleagues measured a value of 73 km per second per megaparsec, indicating galaxies are moving at a faster rate than implied by observations of the early Universe. The Hubble data are so precise that astronomers cannot dismiss the gap between the two results as errors in any single measurement or method. “Both results have been tested multiple ways, so barring a series of unrelated mistakes. It is increasingly likely that this is not a bug but a feature of the Universe,” Professor Riess said.

 

The team proposes a few possible explanations for the mismatch, all related to the 95% of the Universe that is shrouded in darkness. One possibility is that dark energy, already known to be accelerating the cosmos, may be shoving galaxies away from each other with even greater — or growing — strength. This means that the acceleration itself might not have a constant value in the Universe but changes over time. Another idea is that the Universe contains a new subatomic particle that travels close to the speed of light.

 

Such speedy particles are collectively called ‘dark radiation’ and include previously-known particles like neutrinos, which are created in nuclear reactions and radioactive decays. Unlike a normal neutrino, which interacts by a subatomic force, this new particle would be affected only by gravity and is dubbed a ‘sterile neutrino.’ Yet another attractive possibility is that dark matter interacts more strongly with normal matter or radiation than previously assumed.

 

Any of these scenarios would change the contents of the early Universe, leading to inconsistencies in theoretical models. These inconsistencies would result in an incorrect value for the Hubble constant, inferred from observations of the young cosmos. This value would then be at odds with the number derived from the Hubble observations.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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How Women Experience Addiction Differently Than Men

How Women Experience Addiction Differently Than Men | Love | Scoop.it

Addiction to substances such as heroin and alcohol affect women differently than men. A 2010 American Journal of Public Health study found that women were more likely to be prescribed opioids than men and to continue them long-term. Another study of chronic pain patients prescribed opioids in the Journal of Pain revealed that women’s increased risk of opioid misuse was related to emotional issues while men misused opioids because of legal and behavioral problems.

 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), women are more likely to have chronic pain, be prescribed prescription painkillers and at higher doses than men; and become dependent more quickly than men. From 1999 to 2010, CDC data revealed that 48,000 women died of prescription-related overdoses. During this timeframe, prescription overdose deaths increased over 400% among women, versus 237% among men. The sobering statistics don’t end with prescriptions. The National Center for Health Statistics reported heroin overdose deaths among women tripled from 2010 through 2013.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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What is Remote Sensing? The Definitive Guide to Earth Observation

What is Remote Sensing? The Definitive Guide to Earth Observation | Love | Scoop.it
Remote sensing is the science of obtaining information without physically being there. For example, the 3 most common remote sensing methods is by airplane, satellite and drone.

So how is remote sensing solving some of our most challenging problems on Earth? And how does remote sensing go above and beyond human vision to capture Earth’s features?

From weather forecasting to military intelligence, this is just the tip of the iceberg.

Via Fernando Gil
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Global Media, War, and Technology

Global Media, War, and Technology | Love | Scoop.it
The experience of war has changed fundamentally – not only for those fighting and reporting, but also for those on the home front. High-tech nations wage wars from a distance using satellite-guided weaponry while non-state military actors, terrorist organizations, and citizen journalists have increasingly added new voices and visual perspectives to the conversation about conflict.

The ubiquity of smartphones, internet access, and social media transports the experience and complexity of war directly into our lives. Cyberspace offers greater freedoms and access to information at the same time as we discover a dramatic global rise of cyber espionage, internet censorship, and surveillance.

Via Fernando Gil
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'Mind over matter': Stephen Hawking – obituary by Roger Penrose | Science | The Guardian

'Mind over matter': Stephen Hawking – obituary by Roger Penrose | Science | The Guardian | Love | Scoop.it
Theoretical physicist who made revolutionary contributions to our understanding of the nature of the universe

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Key symptom of old age reversed 'surprisingly easily', study finds

Key symptom of old age reversed 'surprisingly easily', study finds | Love | Scoop.it
The loss of muscle mass and fitness in old age may be reversible by providing the body with a key molecule it needs to rebuild blood vessels, scientists have found. The arteries and capillaries which transport oxygen and nutrients around the body are not replaced as quickly when we’re older and this leads muscles to tire more quickly. Eventually they start to atrophy from under use.
Via Levin Chin
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Newly-discovered human organ may help explain how cancer spreads

Newly-discovered human organ may help explain how cancer spreads | Love | Scoop.it
A newly discovered network of fluid-filled channels in the human body may be a previously-unknown organ, and it seems to help move cancer cells around the body
Via Levin Chin
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Brain implant boosts human memory by mimicking how we learn

Brain implant boosts human memory by mimicking how we learn | Love | Scoop.it
A device that zaps the brain with electricity has improved people’s scores on memory tests. It may have the power to help dementia, or boost other brain skills
Via Levin Chin
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The Black Woman Who Biked Across the US Alone During the 1930s Jim Crow Era

The Black Woman Who Biked Across the US Alone During the 1930s Jim Crow Era | Love | Scoop.it
Despite pervasive racism and the weight of the Great Depression, Bessie Stringfield found freedom on the open road.
Via Levin Chin
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Brain activity appears to continue after people are dead, according to new study

Brain activity appears to continue after people are dead, according to new study | Love | Scoop.it
Brain activity may continue for more than 10 minutes after the body appears to have died, according to a new study. Canadian doctors in an intensive care unit appear to have observed a person's brain continuing to work even after they were declared clinically dead. In the case, doctors confirmed their patient was dead through a range of the normal observations, including the absence of a pulse and unreactive pupils. But tests showed that the patients’ brain appeared to keep working – experiencing the same kind of brain waves that are seen during deep sleep.
Via Levin Chin
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The world’s first crewless cargo ship will launch next year #digitalTransformation #WhyItMatters

The world’s first crewless cargo ship will launch next year #digitalTransformation #WhyItMatters | Love | Scoop.it

The world’s first crewless, automated cargo ship will launch in 2018, reports the Wall Street Journal, and is expected to be fully autonomous by 2020.


Via Farid Mheir
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Farid Mheir's curator insight, March 11, 2:43 PM

WHY IT MATTERS: we think of autonomous vehicles as self-driving cars. But we are more likely to see business and professional applications such as this self-driving cargo ship appear first.

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Introduction to Deep Learning via @Algorithmia #AI #DeepLearning #Reference

Introduction to Deep Learning via @Algorithmia #AI #DeepLearning #Reference | Love | Scoop.it

Deep Learning is at the cutting edge of what machines can do, and developers and business leaders absolutely need to understand what it is and how it works. This unique type of algorithm has far surpassed any previous benchmarks for classification of images, text, and voice.


Via Farid Mheir
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Farid Mheir's curator insight, March 11, 2:57 PM

WHY IT MATTERS: good introduction to a technology that will impact all our lives in the very near future.

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Inspired by brain’s visual cortex, new AI utterly wrecks CAPTCHA security #AI

Inspired by brain’s visual cortex, new AI utterly wrecks CAPTCHA security #AI | Love | Scoop.it

In a recent issue of Science, a Bay Area startup called Vicarious AI describes an algorithm it created that is able to take minimal training and easily handle CAPTCHAs. It also managed general text recognition. Vicarious' secret? It modelled the structure of its AI on information we've gained from studying how the mammalian visual cortex processes images.


Via Farid Mheir
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Farid Mheir's curator insight, March 11, 3:37 PM

WHY IT MATTERS: inspiration from our human brains does provides good starting point for new technologies, and this is one stricking example. From now on, every time you answer a CAPTCHA you will have to wonder if it is really a useful way to prevent machines from accessing systems, given that this new tool does as good a job as a human at guessing what the twisted series of letter are...

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Astronomers Have Detected the Brightest 'Fast Radio Burst' Ever Seen and Still Have No Idea What's Causing Them

Astronomers Have Detected the Brightest 'Fast Radio Burst' Ever Seen and Still Have No Idea What's Causing Them | Love | Scoop.it

Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) have been one of the more puzzling and fascinating areas of astronomical study ever since the first was detected in 2007 (known as the Lorimer Burst). Much like gravitational waves, the study of these short-lived radio pulses (which last only a few milliseconds) is still in its infancy, and only a 33 events have been detected. What’s more, scientists are still not sure what accounts for them. In early March 2018, scientists using the Parkes Radio Telescope detected three FRBs, one of which was the brightest ever observed.

 

While some believe that they are entirely natural in origin, others have speculated that they could be evidence of extra-terrestrial activity. Regardless of their cause, according to a recent study, three FRBs were detected this month in Australia by the Parkes Observatory radio telescope in remote Australia. Of these three, one happened to be the most powerful FRB recorded to date.

 

The signals were detected on March 1st, March 9th, and March 11th of 2018, and were designated as FRB 180301, FRB 180309 and FRB 180311. Of these, the one recorded on March 9th (FRB 180309) was the brightest ever recorded, having a signal-to-noise ratio that was four times higher than the previous brightest FRB. This event, known as FRB 170827, was detected on August 27th, 2017, by the UTMOST array in Australia.

 

All three of these events were detected by the Parkes radio telescope, which is located in New South Wales about 380 kilometers (236 mi) from Sidney. As one of three telescopes that makes up the Australia Telescope National Facility, this telescope has been studying pulsars, rapidly spinning neutron stars, and conducting large-scale surveys of the sky since 1961. In recent years, it has been dedicated to the detection of FRBs in our Universe.

 

Considering how rare and short-lived FRBs are, recording three in the space of one month is quite the achievement. What’s more, the fact that the detections happened in real-time, rather than being discovered in archival data, is also impressive. Shortly after the event, Stefan Oslowski (of the Swinburne University of Technology) tweeted about this rather fortunate discovery (see below). At present, none of the three events are believed to be “repeaters” – aka. Repeating Fast Radio Bursts. So far, only one FRB has been found to be repeating. This was none other than FRB 121102, which was first detected by the Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico on November 2nd, 2012. In 2015, several more bursts were detected from this some source which had properties that were consistent with the original signal.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Beautifully Designed Map Shows the Literal Translations of Country Names: "Place of Abundant Fish" (Panama), "Land of Many Rabbits" (Spain), and More



Recently we featured a world map that labels each country not with its name in English, but its name in its own language.

Via Fernando Gil
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6 Ways to Get Users to Love Self-Service Analytics

6 Ways to Get Users to Love Self-Service Analytics | Love | Scoop.it
If your enterprise wants to spread self-service analytics throughout the organization, buying the platform or tool is just the first step. It's just as important to get people to actually use it. Here's how some successful companies are doing it.

Via Fernando Gil
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