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Are Children Remembering Their Past Lives?

Are Children Remembering Their Past Lives? | Love | Scoop.it
Are Children Remembering Their Past Lives?
BY Kirsten Cowart, Spirit Science Are more children remembering past life experiences?

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I'm trying to remember what I did yesterday .. Haha

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Vanessa Schlachtaub Bruni's curator insight, April 20, 2014 5:36 AM

even adults, if they are still human beings

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Ancient skull from China may rewrite the origins of our species

Ancient skull from China may rewrite the origins of our species | Love | Scoop.it
The 260,000-year-old Dali skull was found in China, but it looks a lot like the earliest known members of our species – which were found in Africa
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Special Collection - Yoga for improving health and well-being | Cochrane Library

Special Collection - Yoga for improving health and well-being | Cochrane Library | Love | Scoop.it
Yoga originated thousands of years ago in India as an integrated physical, mental, and spiritual practice based on ancient Vedic philosophy, and is connected to Ayurveda, the system of traditional Indian medicine. During the 20th century, yoga became increasingly recognised outside India, and over the past decades it has continued to grow in popularity worldwide as system for promoting health and well-being. While modern yoga often focuses on physical poses and is sometimes thought of as a type of exercise, the practice usually incorporates one or more of the mental or spiritual elements that are traditionally part of yoga, such as relaxation, concentration, or meditation. For this reason, yoga is considered a mind-body exercise.There are currently many different types or schools of yoga, each with a different emphasis on and approach to practice. It is widely thought that some of these yoga practices may help treat or prevent physical or mental illnesses, and improve overall quality of life. There is therefore a need for information on the potential health benefits and harms of yoga.This Cochrane Library Special Collection of systematic reviews on yoga focuses on reviews evaluating the effectiveness of yoga for improving physical or mental symptoms and quality of life in a range of health conditions. It has been developed to bring the best available evidence on the health-related effects of yoga to the attention of the general public, patients, health professionals, and other decision makers, and to inform choices on the use of yoga to improve health and well-being.This Special Collection has been collated by L Susan Wieland of the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field, with reviews prepared by the authors and editors of several Cochrane groups (see Acknowledgements).

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If You Tear a Knee Ligament, Arthritis Is Likely to Follow in 10 Years

If You Tear a Knee Ligament, Arthritis Is Likely to Follow in 10 Years | Love | Scoop.it
The limited research on the long-term effects of damage to connective tissue indicates that a patient, no matter how young, has a 50 percent chance of developing arthritis within a decade.

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Liz PT PYT ATC CSCS's curator insight, November 8, 10:55 AM
This article doesn't consider rehabilitation; perhaps that is part of the problem?
Phil Garofalo Broadway Physical Therapy, Inc. www.nsptinc.com 781-284-0559's curator insight, November 9, 8:59 AM

Interesting article. Does it apply to you? Let us help you 781-284-0559

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Will Italy's Ominous Supervolcano Erupt Soon?

Will Italy's Ominous Supervolcano Erupt Soon? | Love | Scoop.it
Phlegrean Fields is waking up. Scientists are trying to predict what it will do next, and what its unrest means for volcanoes worldwide

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How bright is the moon, really?

How bright is the moon, really? | Love | Scoop.it
The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is planning to take new measurements of the Moon's brightness, a highly useful property that satellites rely upon every day.

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Translocated hawks thrive in Hispaniola

Translocated hawks thrive in Hispaniola | Love | Scoop.it
Species translocation -- capturing animals in one place and releasing them in another -- is a widely used conservation method for establishing or reestablishing populations of threatened species. However, translocation projects often fail when the transplanted animals fail to thrive in their new home. A new study demonstrates how close monitoring of the animals being released into a new area is helping wildlife managers gauge the success of their effort to save the Ridgway's hawk of Hispaniola.

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Yellowstone spawned twin super-eruptions that altered global climate

Yellowstone spawned twin super-eruptions that altered global climate | Love | Scoop.it
A new geological record of the Yellowstone supervolcano's last catastrophic eruption is rewriting the story of what happened 630,000 years ago and how it affected Earth's climate. This eruption formed the vast Yellowston

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The secret sea garden › Photos (ABC Science)

The secret sea garden › Photos (ABC Science) | Love | Scoop.it
Deep below the waves, photographer Ian Wallace discovers a beautiful world of seaweed gardens that few people get to see.

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The Kapok Tree - a giant under threat in the Amazon rainforest - dw.com

The Kapok Tree - a giant under threat in the Amazon rainforest - dw.com | Love | Scoop.it
I am one of the tallest trees in the Amazon rainforest. I grow to a height of up to 50 meters and live for several hundred years. Many regard me as magical.

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Breathtaking Photos of Ancient Trees Against Starry Skies

Breathtaking Photos of Ancient Trees Against Starry Skies | Love | Scoop.it
The timeless beauty of trees and constellations.

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Man's earliest ancestors discovered in southern England

Man's earliest ancestors discovered in southern England | Love | Scoop.it
Fossils of the oldest mammals related to mankind have been discovered on the Jurassic Coast of Dorset in the UK.
The two teeth are from small, rat-like creatures that lived 145 million years ago in the shadow of the dinosaurs. They are the earliest undisputed fossils of mammals belonging to the line that led to human beings.

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Lake Nyos

Lake Nyos | Love | Scoop.it
Known locally as “the Bad Lake,” Lake Nyos, located in the Northwest Region of Cameroon, Africa, carried a folklore of danger, and tales were spoken of an evil spirit which emerged from the lake to kill all those who lived near it. This legend contained the memory of a very real threat.

Lake Nyos was formed in a volcanic crater created as recently as 400 years ago. Crater lakes commonly have high levels of CO2 as they are formed by the volcanic activity happening miles beneath them. Under normal circumstances this gas is released over time as the lake water turns over.

But Lake Nyos was different: an unusually still lake, with little in the way of environmental agitation. Rather than releasing the gas, the lake was acting as a high-pressure storage unit. Its deep waters were becoming ever more loaded with gas until more than five gallons of CO2 were dissolved in every gallon of water. Pressurized to the physical limit, Lake Nyos was a time bomb.

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Photographing Some of the World’s Oldest and Wisest Trees

Photographing Some of the World’s Oldest and Wisest Trees | Love | Scoop.it
Landscape photographers Diane Cook and Len Jenshel spent over two years traveling the world to photograph its most remarkable trees.

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Analysis | Ancient data, modern math and the hunt for 11 lost cities of the Bronze Age

Analysis | Ancient data, modern math and the hunt for 11 lost cities of the Bronze Age | Love | Scoop.it
Using numbers scrawled by Bronze Age merchants on 4,000-year-old clay tablets, a historian and three economists have developed a novel way to pinpoint the locations of lost cities of the ancient world.

The ancient city of Kanesh, located in the middle of modern-day Turkey, was a hub of trade in the Anatolian region four millennia ago. Modern-day archaeologists have unearthed artifacts from the city, including more than 23,000 cuneiform texts, inscribed in clay by ancient Assyrian merchants.

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MultiBrief: So you have a sports injury? Here’s what you need to eat

MultiBrief: So you have a sports injury? Here’s what you need to eat | Love | Scoop.it
​For athletes and regular exercisers of all types, injuries can seem like the end of the world. When your sport or activity is such a big part of your life, suddenly being unable to train and compete leaves a gaping hole.

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Volcanic eruptions may have contributed to war in ancient Egypt

Volcanic eruptions may have contributed to war in ancient Egypt | Love | Scoop.it
Distant volcanic eruptions may have indirectly triggered a series of revolts by the people of ancient Egypt against their despised Ptolemaic overlords according to a new study that analyses volcanic and historic records.

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You Can Now Take a Virtual Hike Around Canada's Polar Desert

You Can Now Take a Virtual Hike Around Canada's Polar Desert | Love | Scoop.it
Quttinirpaaq National Park just became the northernmost spot on Google Streetview.

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Ancient, lost mountains in the Karoo reveals the secrets of massive extinction event

Ancient, lost mountains in the Karoo reveals the secrets of massive extinction event | Love | Scoop.it
For her Ph.D., Viglietti studied the fossil-rich sediments present in the Karoo, deposited during the tectonic events that created the Gondwanides, and found that the vertebrate animals in the area started to either go extinct or become less common much earlier than what was previously thought.

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Scavenging to survive below the seafloor

Scavenging to survive below the seafloor | Love | Scoop.it
Microorganisms living in the sediments buried below the seafloor obtain their nutrients by using secreted enzymes to degrade adsorbed detritus. A new study shows that in order to survive for long time scales, microorganisms eat one another after they die.

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New evidence for dark matter makes it even more exotic

New evidence for dark matter makes it even more exotic | Love | Scoop.it
Galaxy clusters are the largest known structures in the Universe, containing thousands of galaxies and hot gas. But more importantly, they contain the mysterious dark matter, which accounts for 27 percent of all matter and energy. Current models of dark matter predict that galaxy clusters have very dense cores, and those cores contain a very massive galaxy that never moves from the cluster's center.

But after studying ten galaxy clusters, David Harvey at EPFL's Laboratory of Astrophysics and his colleagues in France and the UK have discovered that the density is much smaller than predicted, and that the galaxy at the center actually moves.

Every galaxy cluster contains a galaxy that is brighter than the others, aptly named "brightest cluster galaxy" or BCG. Recent evidence from simulations of exotic, non-standard dark matter shows that BCGs actually wobble long after the galaxy cluster has relaxed. This is residual wobbling caused by massive merging of galaxy clusters.

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Out of the darkness

Out of the darkness | Love | Scoop.it
Some of the darkest places on Earth sparkle with light thanks to a curious natural phenomenon known as bioluminescence, writes Rachel Sullivan.

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Sheep are able to recognize human faces from photographs

Sheep are able to recognize human faces from photographs | Love | Scoop.it
The study, published today in the journal Royal Society: Open Science, is part a series of tests given to the sheep to monitor their cognitive abilities. Because of the relatively large size of their brains and their longevity, sheep are a good animal model for studying neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease.

The ability to recognise faces is one of the most important human social skills. We recognise familiar faces easily, and can identify unfamiliar faces from repeatedly presented images. As with some other animals such as dogs and monkeys, sheep are social animals that can recognise other sheep as well as familiar humans. Little is known, however, about their overall ability to process faces.

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Why do starlings dance in the sky?

Why do starlings dance in the sky? | Love | Scoop.it
The National Geographic video above shows a flock of starlings in the Netherlands. How confounding and impressively graceful is this aerial ballet.

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Geologists uncover Antarctica's fossil forests

Geologists uncover Antarctica's fossil forests | Love | Scoop.it
During Antarctica's summer, from late November through January, UW-Milwaukee geologists Erik Gulbranson and John Isbell climbed the McIntyre Promontory's frozen slopes in the Transantarctic Mountains. High above the ice fields, they combed the mountain's gray rocks for fossils from the continent's green, forested past.

By the trip's end, the geologists had found fossil fragments of 13 trees. The discovered fossils reveal that the trees are over 260 million years old, meaning that this forest grew at the end of the Permian Period, before the first dinosaurs, when Antarctica was still at the South Pole.

"People have known about the fossils in Antarctica since the 1910-12 Robert Falcon Scott expedition," said Gulbranson, a paleoecologist and visiting assistant professor in UWM's Department of Geosciences. "However, most of Antarctica is still unexplored. Sometimes, you might be the first person to ever climb a particular mountain."

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Twilight trick: A new type of cell has been found in the eye of a deep-sea fish

Twilight trick: A new type of cell has been found in the eye of a deep-sea fish | Love | Scoop.it
A new type of cell has been found in the eye of a deep-sea fish, and scientists say the discovery opens a new world of understanding about vision in a variety of light conditions.

University of Queensland scientists found the new cell type in the deep-sea pearlside fish (Maurolicus spp.), which have an unusual visual system adapted for twilight conditions.

Dr Fanny de Busserolles at UQ's Queensland Brain Institute said the retina of most vertebrate animals - including humans - contained two photoreceptor types: rods for vision in dim light, and cones for daytime vision. Each had different light-sensitive proteins.

"Deep-sea fish, which live at ocean depths below 200m, are generally only active in the dark, so most species have lost all their cones in favour of light-sensitive rods," Dr de Busserolles said.

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