Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music
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Does a Better Recess Equal a Better School Day?

Does a Better Recess Equal a Better School Day? | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it
A safe and healthy recess has the potential to drive better student behavior, health, and learning, according to this study from Mathematica Policy Research and the John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities at Stanford University.
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archive | daily eclectic excerpts by editor Richard Vague | www..com

archive | daily eclectic excerpts by editor Richard Vague | www..com | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it
Delanceyplace is a brief daily email with an excerpt or quote we view as interesting or noteworthy, offered with commentary to provide context. There is no theme, except that most excerpts will come from a non-fiction work, primarily historical in focus, and will occasionally be controversial.
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How playing an instrument benefits your brain - Anita Collins - YouTube

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-playing-an-instrument-benefits-your-brain-anita-collins When you listen to music, multiple areas of your brai...

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BRAZIL: Interview with Ricardo Castro, Founder and Director of Neojiba

BRAZIL: Interview with Ricardo Castro, Founder and Director of Neojiba | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it

Ricardo Castro, the founder and director ofNeojiba, let me sit down and interview him this week to learn more about the organization.  Before creating Neojiba, he says that his storyis of the typical successful classical pianist.  He was born in the interior of Bahia but grew up in Salvador, started playing piano at age 3 and had a natural knack for it.  He saved enough money to go to Europe at age 18 and studied there, then started winning competitions (including the Leeds Piano Competition in 1993,) recorded CDs, performed with orchestras all around the world, and made friends with other pianists likeMartha Argerich, Friedrich Gulda, Alicia de Larrocha, and Nelson Freire.  But being around older pianists like this showed him that something was missing in this life of a traveling concert pianist and that it could be very lonely.  What seemed to be missing for him was teaching and collaborating.  In the early 90s, he took a post teaching masterclasses for one week a month at a conservatory in Switzerland, a position he still holds, and started a piano duo with the Portuguese pianist Maria Joao Pires.  Through Pires, who shares many of his views on collaborative music and how it can be used socially, Castro was able to learn about a music project that she developed in Portugal and began to visit similar projects in Bahia to help. 

But it was finally in 2005 when he traveled to Venezuela to perform and saw El Sistema in person that he was inspired to create something on his own.  As El Sistema developed in a South American country that is very similar to Brazil in many ways, this gave him the courage to try to create a similar project in Bahia.  He met Jose Abreu who told him that if he started an orchestra, then they would send him a conductor and teachers to help them get off the ground.  When he returned to Bahia, he started telling everybody about El Sistema and how he wanted to create something similar here.  One of the friends he shared this wish with was Marcio Meirelles, a theater artist who soon after was appointed Secretary of Culture for the state of Bahia.  The government then invited Castro to create the project in 2007.

He started with one assistant and a budget of about US$100,000 (which today is now 33 employees and a budget of more than US$3 million.)  Through the media he put out a call out for youths to come and audition for a new youth orchestra.  They had about 60-70 youths audition and chose about half of them, not just on their technical ability but on how teachable they were.  Castro describes their musical level upon entering as being able to play scales or music at their church at a basic level.  Some of them were students that were left over from a failed state-funded youth orchestra in a favela that was of very poor quality and hardly known in the rest of the city.  Other were students from the Federal University of Bahia that graduated but had not been sufficiently trained to create a career in music.


READ MORE HERE:

http://keanesouthard.blogspot.be/2013/08/brazil-week-22-interview-with-ricardo.html


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Research Finds The Effects Of Homework On Elementary School Students, And The Results Are Surprising

Research Finds The Effects Of Homework On Elementary School Students, And The Results Are Surprising | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it
You might think homework is a great thing, but recent research suggests that maybe it's time to re-evaluate our use of it.
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Educational Leadership:Engaging the Whole Child (online only):The Neuroscience of Joyful Education

Educational Leadership:Engaging the Whole Child (online only):The Neuroscience of Joyful Education | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner. Our 175,000 members in 119 countries are professional educators from all levels and subject areas––superintendents, supervisors, principals, teachers, professors of education, and school board members.
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Risky Play: Why Children Love It and Need It

Risky Play: Why Children Love It and Need It | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it
To protect our children we must allow them to play in ways deemed "risky."
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Raising confident kids: Let your child fall out of trees - Kidspot

Raising confident kids: Let your child fall out of trees - Kidspot | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it
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8 science-backed reasons for letting your kids play outside

8 science-backed reasons for letting your kids play outside | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it
You probably already know that outdoor play is essential for children's health and well-being. Here are eight science-backed reasons that prove you're right.
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Are playgrounds too safe? Winnipeg school puts some risk into recess

Are playgrounds too safe?  Winnipeg school puts some risk into recess | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it
Young children at Winnipeg's Lord Selkirk School are climbing rocks and jumping off logs on a playground that students and parents say has gone from dull to inspiring.
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All Work and No Play: Where Did All the Recess Go? | Babble

All Work and No Play: Where Did All the Recess Go? | Babble | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it
When I think of how little playtime my son gets during the school day it's downright depressing.
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Why Kids Need to Move, Touch and Experience to Learn

Why Kids Need to Move, Touch and Experience to Learn | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it
Students can better understand math and physics problems by acting them out. This type of embodied learning can help open up the mind to abstract concepts.
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How music affects the brain | University Affairs

How music affects the brain | University Affairs | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it
Canadian researchers lead the way in understanding the neurological, psychological and cognitive basis of music.

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Music Training Speeds Up Brain Development In Children



Observing a pianist at a recital converting musical notations into precisely timed finger movements on a piano can be a powerful emotional experience.

As a researcher of neuroscience and a pianist myself, I understand that the mastering of this skill not only takes practice, but also requires complex coordination of many different brain regions.

Brain regions that are responsible for our hearing, sight and movement abilities engage in an amazing symphony to produce music. It takes coordinating both hands and communicating emotionally with other players and listeners to produce the magical effect. The combination of such demands is likely to influence brain structures and their functions.

In our lab, we want to understand whether music training during childhood improves brain functions for processing sound more generally. These functions are important for the development of language and reading skills.

Music training and brain

Over the past two decades, several investigators have reported differences in the brain and behavior of musicians compared to nonmusicians.

Music training has been found to be related to better language and mathematical skills, higher IQ and overall greater academic achievement. Also, differences between musicians and nonmusicians have been found in areas of the brain related to hearing and movement, among others.


Music training helps develop many other skills. woodleywonderworks, CC BY

However, the interpretation of the findings remains unclear. For example, the differences reported between adult musicians and nonmusicians might be due to long-term intensive training or might result primarily from inherent biological factors, such as genetic makeup.

Or, as with many aspects of the nature-versus-nurture debate, the differences may well result from contributions of both environmental and biological factors.


One way to better understand the effects of music training on child development would be to study children before they start any music training and follow them systematically after, to see how their brain and behavior change in relation to their training.

It would involve including a comparison group, as all children change with age. The ideal comparison group would be children who participate in equally socially interactive but nonmusical training, such as sports. Follow-up assessments after their training would reveal how each group changes over time.

Impact of music training on child development

In 2012, our research group at the Brain and Creativity Institute at University of Southern California began a five-year study that did just that.

We began to investigate the effects of group-based music training in 80 children between ages six and seven. We have continued to follow them, to explore the effects of such training on their brain, cognitive, social and emotional development.

We started the study when one group of children were about to begin music training through the Youth Orchestra Los Angeles program. This free community-based music program was inspired by El Sistema, a music program that was started in Venezuela and proved to be tranformative in changing the lives of underprivileged children.


What is the impact of group-based music training? GSK, CC BY-NC-ND

The second group of children were about to begin a sports training program with a community-based soccer program. They were not engaged in music training.

A third group of children were from public schools and community centers in the same areas of Los Angeles. All three groups of children were from equally underprivileged and ethnic minority communities of Los Angeles.


Each year, we meet every participant and their families at our institute for a testing period over the course of two to three days. During this visit, we measure language and memory abilities, capacity to process music and speech, and brain development of each child. We also conduct a detailed interview with their families.

At the beginning of the study, when children did not have any music or sports training, we found that the children in the music training group were not different from the children in the other two groups. Specifically, there were no differences in the brains intellectual, motor, musical and social measures between groups.

How our brain processes sound

The auditory pathway connects our ear to our brain to process sound. When we hear something, our eardrums receive it in the form of vibrations of air molecules. That is converted into a brain signal through a series of elegant mechanisms in the inner ear. That signal is then sent to the hearing area of the brain referred to as the auditory cortex, located near the sides of the brain.

Using different tasks, we measured how childrens brains register and process sound before taking part in their training and each year thereafter with a brain imaging technique called electroencephalography (EEG). This systematic investigation allowed us to track the maturation of the auditory pathway.

In one task, for example, we presented pairs of unfamiliar musical melodies to children while recording the signal from their brain, through EEG. The pairs of melodies were either identical or occasionally had tonal or rhythmic irregularities. We asked the children to identify whether the pairs were similar or different.

We checked how successfully children could detect whether the melody pairs were different and the corresponding brain responses to these occasional differences. That allowed us to measure how well the childrens brains were attuned to melody and rhythm. In general, the brain produces a specific response when detecting an unexpected change in a pattern of sound.


How music training develops the brain

After two years, the group of children who had undergone music training were more accurate at detecting changes in pitch when the melodies were different. All three groups of children were able to identify easily when the melodies were the same.


Children in the music group show a stronger brain response. A Health Blog, CC BY-SA

That indicated that children undergoing musical training were more attentive to the melodies. Children in the music group also had stronger brain response to differences in pitch compared to the children in the other groups. We also observed that musically trained children had faster development of the brain pathway responsible for encoding and processing sound.

Three years of this study remain. But these interim results are promising. They support previous findings on the positive impact of music training on brain development.

Our findings suggest that music training during childhood, even for a period as brief as two years, can accelerate brain development and sound processing. We believe that this may benefit language acquisition in children given that developing language and reading skills engage similar brain areas. This can particularly benefit at-risk children in low socioeconomic status neighborhoods who experience more difficulties with language development.

We hope that the findings from this study will not only lead to a better understanding of the benefits of musical training but also provide further insights into the social and psychological merits of music education for children in underserved communities.

Assal Habibi, Senior Research Associate, University of Southern California Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Read more: http://www.iflscience.com/brain/music-training-speeds-up-brain-development-in-children/

The post Music Training Speeds Up Brain Development In Children appeared first on Educate Questions Information Answers.


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AAA State of Play Blog: Experts Love Play! 5 Exciting Scholarly Studies on the Benefits of Play

AAA State of Play Blog: Experts Love Play! 5 Exciting Scholarly Studies on the Benefits of Play | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it
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Homework is wrecking our kids: The research is clear, let’s ban elementary homework

Homework is wrecking our kids: The research is clear, let’s ban elementary homework | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it
Homework does have an impact on young students — but it’s not a good one
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To do better in school, kids should exercise their bodies as well as their brains, experts say

To do better in school, kids should exercise their bodies as well as their brains, experts say | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it
Kids do better in school when they make time for exercise and physical play, experts say.
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Green Spaces Linked to Kids' Cognitive Development

Green Spaces Linked to Kids' Cognitive Development | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it
New Spanish research finds young brains develop faster if kids have more exposure to the natural world.
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THE UNSAFE CHILD: Less Outdoor Play is Causing More Harm than Good | Children & Nature Network

THE UNSAFE CHILD: Less Outdoor Play is Causing More Harm than Good | Children & Nature Network | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it
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Stop Trying to Make Everything Educational - Happiness is here

Stop Trying to Make Everything Educational - Happiness is here | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it
With the push for an earlier and earlier start to academics for our kids, we all know the best thing we can do for them is let them play for as long as we can. Yet, scrolling through my facebook … Continue reading →
Rachelle Ackerman's insight:

Yes, yes and yes!

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3 Ways A Dirt Pile Is Better Than Toys - Parents Who

3 Ways A Dirt Pile Is Better Than Toys - Parents Who | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it
I just spent 45 minutes sitting on an electric meter watching my boys play on a big dirt pile. I had plenty of time to think about all the toys that my boys received for birthdays and holidays and special occasions and how none of them have come close to absorbing, engaging and entertaining them …
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What Project-Based Learning Is — and What It Isn’t | Mind/Shift

What Project-Based Learning Is — and What It Isn’t | Mind/Shift | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it
Screenshot/High Tech High The term "project-based learning" gets tossed around a lot in discussions about how to connect students to what they're learnin

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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, April 12, 2015 9:11 AM

Project-based learning has to be "grown" organically from the learners desire to find out more about the topic of interest. The students "invest" more time and energy in the project by immersion in the study. 

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Why Kids Need to Move, Touch and Experience to Learn

Why Kids Need to Move, Touch and Experience to Learn | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it
Students can better understand math and physics problems by acting them out. This type of embodied learning can help open up the mind to abstract concepts.
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The Science (and Practice) of Creativity

The Science (and Practice) of Creativity | Progressive Education & Outdoor Play & Benefits of Music | Scoop.it
"Creativity isn't about music and art; it is an attitude to life, one that everybody needs," wrote the University of Winchester's Professor Guy Claxton in the lead-up to the 2014 World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE) dedicated to creativity and education. "It is a composite of habits of mind which include curiosity, skepticism, imagination, determination, craftsmanship, collaboration, and self-evaluation."

Sounds like the perfect skill set for equipping young people to navigate an increasingly complex and unpredictable world. Encouragingly, there's plenty of evidence -- from both research and practice -- that most of the above can be taught in the classroom. In fact, innovation and education experts agree that creativity can fit perfectly into any learning system.

But before it can be incorporated broadly in curriculum, it must first be understood.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Creativity



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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, March 30, 2015 9:48 PM

Creativity fosters teaching and learning.

 

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Dr. Deborah Brennan's curator insight, March 31, 2015 6:02 PM

Creativity has always been what has set America apart from other nations.  The ability of our population to imagine new solutions to everyday problems and create innovations has kept America as a world leader and given us the economic advantage.  many nations have looked at our education system and wondered how they could nurture this ability in their children.  As a gifted educator, teaching creativity has always been our focus.  Unfortunately, in these days of standardized testing, which lead to standardized curriculum and schools, we are losing our creative advantage.  Creativity is a key for ALL our children.  our children enter school with an active imagination and a natural ability for creative thinking.  We must understand creativity and how we can nurture it in our classrooms and schools. 

Ann-Lois Edström's curator insight, April 7, 2015 12:56 PM

Understanding the creative process and creating a creative atmosphere conducive to learning is crucial