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Live longer in good health and you will have a chance to extend your healthy life even further
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Robotic arm gives quadriplegic man a new sense of touch

Robotic arm gives quadriplegic man a new sense of touch | Longevity science | Scoop.it
In 2012, quadriplegic Jan Scheuermann used her own thoughts to control a robotic arm and feed herself a chocolate bar thanks to a system developed by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC). Now, the same team has recreated the physical feeling of touch through a robotic hand, allowing a quadriplegic man to feel "his" fingers and hand for the first time in 10 years
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We'll Soon Trust AI More Than Doctors to Diagnose Disease

We'll Soon Trust AI More Than Doctors to Diagnose Disease | Longevity science | Scoop.it
When Khosla looks 10 or 15 years into healthcare’s future, he sees a medical landscape seething with data-hungry, intelligent algorithms like Google's AlphaGo instead of doctors as we know them today.

“Medicine has improved a lot as a practice,” Khosla said. “But I think it’s time to take this practice of medicine and turn it into the science of medicine.”

To make that happen, Khosla thinks we have to hand medical expertise over to the machines.
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First human clinical trial for nicotinamide riboside | KurzweilAI

First human clinical trial for nicotinamide riboside | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The new research, reported Oct. 10 in the open-access journal Nature Communications, determined the time and dose-dependent effects of NR on blood NAD+ metabolism in humans. It was led by Charles Brenner, PhD, professor and Roy J. Carver Chair of Biochemistry at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in collaboration with colleagues at Queens University Belfast and ChromaDex Corp., which supplied the NR used in the trial.**

The human trial involved six men and six women, all healthy. Each participant received single oral doses of 100 mg, 300 mg, or 1,000 mg of NR in a different sequence with a seven-day gap between doses. After each dose, blood and urine samples were collected and analyzed by Brenner’s lab to measure various NAD+ metabolites in a process called metabolomics.

The trial showed that the NR vitamin increased NAD+ metabolism by amounts directly related to the dose, and there were no serious side effects with any of the doses.
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The Future of Surgery Is Robotic, Data-Driven, and Artificially Intelligent 

The Future of Surgery Is Robotic, Data-Driven, and Artificially Intelligent  | Longevity science | Scoop.it

We’re on the verge of what we might call the second wave in surgical robotics,” said Catherine Mohr, vice president of strategy at Intuitive Surgical, while speaking at Singularity University’s Exponential Medicine conference this week.

Mohr believes this new wave of innovation will be characterized by the convergence of surgical robotics with AI and data gathered from robotic systems.

Surgery is about to get “digitized.” We’ll start collecting and analyzing data passing through these robotic systems, like motion tracking. “Once we can turn something into data, then we can start making exponential changes,” Mohr said.

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Use of controversial prostate cancer test may be holding steady

Orders for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests didn't significantly change at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas after 2012, when the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended against it, warning with "moderate certainty" that the benefits of PSA-based screening for prostate cancer do not outweigh the harms.
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Blood markers peel back the curtain on a stealthy form of liver disease

Blood markers peel back the curtain on a stealthy form of liver disease | Longevity science | Scoop.it
There are more than 100 different types of liver disease, but one in particular is starting to garner some serious attention in the medical world. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, or NASH, is unrelated to alcohol consumption and comes about through the buildup of fat and scar tissue in the liver. It is expected to overtake hepatitis C as the leading cause of US liver transplants by 2020, due in part to a lack of obvious symptoms and a simple test for diagnosis. Help may soon be on the way, however, with scientists discovering a way to detect telltale signs of NASH in its early stages, raising the prospect of a simple blood test and much earlier interventions.

Though scientists haven't been able to pin down any one cause of NASH, obesity, type-2 diabetes and a lack of physical exercise are all common risk factors. Its onset is slow and can take place over years starting with the accumulation of fat cells in the liver, something known as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NASH is the more extreme form NAFLD and is typified by inflammation and scarring, which in turn leads to things like cirrhosis, liver failure or liver cancer.
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Study shows health improving globally, but progress is patchy

Study shows health improving globally, but progress is patchy | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Globally, people's health is improving and life expectancy is rising, but progress is far from universal with chronic diseases bringing long-term illness and causing seven out of 10 deaths, according to research published on Thursday.

The Global Burden of Disease study, which shows the key drivers of ill health, disability and death in individual countries, found that by 2015, the world population had gained more than a decade of life expectancy since 1980 - rising to 69.0 years in men and 74.8 years in women.
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Genetically engineered peptides on 2D nanosheets form bio-nano interfaces | KurzweilAI

Genetically engineered peptides on 2D nanosheets form bio-nano interfaces | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Engineers at the University of Washington have created genetically engineered peptides that self-assemble into arrays of nanowires on two-dimensional nanosheets (single-layer graphene and molybdenum disulfide) to relay information across a bio-nano interface — a first step towards fully self-assembled future biomedical and electro-optical bionanoelectronic devices.

Arrays of peptides could provide organized scaffolds for functional biomolecules, enabling nanoscale bioelectronics interfaces. And designed peptides could be incorporated with metal ions or nanoparticles with specific physical characteristics, thus fine-tuning 2D device performance for chemical and biological sensors.

A bridge between biology and technology

“Bridging this divide would be the key to building the genetically engineered biomolecular solid-state devices of the future,” said UW professor Mehmet Sarikaya in the Departments of Materials Science & Engineering, senior author of an open-access paper published Sept. 22 in Scientific Reports.
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IBM's Watson lends hospital staff a helping hand

IBM's Watson lends hospital staff a helping hand | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Watson, IBM's artificial intelligence computer system, is ridiculously prolific. In the last few years it's written a cookbook, crafted a movie trailer, joined the debate team, and helped in medical education, among many other projects. The latest point on the system's resumé is to help make hospital stays more comfortable for patients and relieve the strain on doctors and nurses through smart speakers that can answer basic questions and grant patients' control over things like room temperature, the lights or the TV.

It's no secret that nursing is a hectic job, and answering a buzzer just to be asked what time lunch will be isn't the best use of a nurse's time – no matter how important the question may be to the patient. And that's where Nurse Watson comes in. With smart speakers hooked up to the IBM Watson Internet of Things (IoT) Platform, patients can ask these kinds of questions, or request actions like opening the blinds, without bothering a human nurse.
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Stress During Childhood Linked to Shorter Telomeres Later in Life | The Scientist Magazine®

Stress During Childhood Linked to Shorter Telomeres Later in Life | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Multiple stressful events during childhood may have a greater impact on telomere length in adulthood compared to stressful events faced during adulthood. While the accumulation of stressful events throughout life increases the chance of having shorter telomeres later in life, adversities experienced during childhood appeared to have the greatest effect on these chromosome caps, according to a study published today (October 3) in PNAS. Each additional adverse event during childhood was associated with an 11 percent-increased odd of shorter telomeres—a marker of cellular aging—past age 50, the authors reported.

The findings “offer new insights into what types of stressors may potentially be most harmful in impacting biological aging markers,” Judith Carroll, who studies the links between behavior and health at the University of California, Los Angeles, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior and was not involved in the work, wrote in an email to The Scientist. “The findings are consistent with other reports suggesting that early life is a particularly vulnerable time when the body is rapidly growing and adapting to its surroundings.”
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Targeting the Noncoding Genome with CRISPR | The Scientist Magazine®

Targeting the Noncoding Genome with CRISPR | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Demonstrating yet another basic research application of CRISPR, two teams have independently reported scaled up CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) and CRISPR/Cas9 noncoding genomic screens.

Researchers at MIT and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard used a large single guide RNA (sgRNA) library to identify noncoding elements that affect the regulation of genes that confer cancer drug resistance. Their work is published today (September 29) in Science. In a separate study also published today in Science, another team—from MIT, Harvard, and the Broad—used a high-throughput CRISPRi screen to find noncoding regulatory elements within a 1 megabase distance of two disease-related genes.

While researchers have previously used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to directly validate previously identified noncoding genomic elements in vivo, the current studies describe larger screens and identify novel noncoding sites.
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Hyperelastic “bone”: A highly versatile, growth factor–free, osteoregenerative, scalable, and surgically friendly biomaterial

Hyperelastic “bone”: A highly versatile, growth factor–free, osteoregenerative, scalable, and surgically friendly biomaterial | Longevity science | Scoop.it
What if we could create custom bone implants that would trigger their own replacement with real bone? Jakus and colleagues have done just this with a promising biomaterial that can be 3D-printed into many shapes and easily deployed in the operating room. Made mainly of hydroxyapatite and either polycaprolactone or poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), this “hyperelastic bone” can be 3D-printed at up to 275 cm3/hour, the authors report. It also promoted bone growth in vitro, in mice and rats, and in a case study of skull repair in a rhesus macaque. Its effectiveness, fast, easy synthesis, and ease of use in surgery set it apart from many of the materials now available for bone repair.
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The Americas declared the first region to eliminate the measles

The Americas declared the first region to eliminate the measles | Longevity science | Scoop.it
As it was with smallpox, polio, rubella and congenital rubella syndrome, the Americas has become the first region in the world to eliminate measles. The announcement was made this week during the 55th Directing Council of the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO), crediting mass vaccination over the last few decades. But while no new cases are originating in the region, officials warned that measles can still be brought in from overseas, meaning vaccination efforts need to be maintained to keep the disease under control.
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Diabetics' wearable sensor seeks sugar in sweat

Diabetics' wearable sensor seeks sugar in sweat | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Led by Dr. Shalini Prasad, a team at the university is creating an electrochemical biosensor that continuously measures glucose in the wearer's sweat.

The flexible device incorporates stacked metal/metal-oxide thin films within a porous polymer-based textile, and utilizes the same basic chemistry and enzymatic reaction found in blood glucose testing strips. That said, instead of being able to analyze a full drop of blood, the sensor will have to make do with the small amount of sweat that would be present on the skin underneath an adhesive patch, or perhaps beneath a health-tracking watch.
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CRISPR Corrects Sickle Cell-Causing Gene in Human Cells | The Scientist Magazine®

CRISPR Corrects Sickle Cell-Causing Gene in Human Cells | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Scientists have used the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technique to rewrite the genetic mutation in blood cells that causes sickle cell disease. Once these treated hematopoietic progenitors, which had been harvested from patients, were given to mice, the cells began to produce healthy hemoglobin.

“What we have right now, if we can scale it up and make sure it works well, is already enough to form the basis of a clinical trial to cure sickle cell disease with gene editing,” study coauthor Mark DeWitt, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Berkeley, told The Los Angeles Times. His team published its results yesterday (October 12) in Science Translational Medicine.
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Lateral Gene Transfer Between Humans and Microbes | The Scientist Magazine®

Lateral Gene Transfer Between Humans and Microbes | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Before we understood that DNA was the genetic code, scientists knew that bacteria transferred it between cells. In 1928, 25 years before the structure of DNA was solved, British bacteriologist Frederick Griffith demonstrated that live, nonvirulent bacteria could transform into virulent microbes after being incubated with a heat-killed virulent strain. Fifteen years later, a trio of researchers at the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research (now Rockefeller University), Oswald Avery, Colin MacLeod, and Maclyn McCarty, demonstrated that this transformation was mediated by DNA. Even dead bacteria, it seemed, could share their genes.

Almost all bacterial genomes show evidence of past LGT events, and the phenomenon is known to have profound effects on microbial biology.
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Taking the Pulse of Medtech With the Exponential Medicine MEDy Awards

Taking the Pulse of Medtech With the Exponential Medicine MEDy Awards | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Singularity University’s annual Exponential Medicine conference highlights the future of medical technology, and its annual MEDy Awards—that’s Medical Entrepreneurship and Disruption—help gauge the pulse of medtech startups.

At this year’s MEDy Awards, startups focused on preventative care via wearables, apps, and data sets. The common thread: rather than treating disease only after it has advanced to the point of being discoverable, let’s create systems to prevent disease in the first place.
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Why Aren't Google And Apple Saving Healthcare? - The Medical Futurist

Why Aren't Google And Apple Saving Healthcare? - The Medical Futurist | Longevity science | Scoop.it
It is a fact that healthcare is unsustainable. American health spending will reach nearly $5 trillion, or 20 percent of gross domestic product by 2021. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that there is a worldwide shortage of around 4.3 million physicians, nurses, and allied health workers. So how could we change it?

The most likely solution is technology.
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Robot surgeons and artificial life: the promise of tiny machines - BBC News

Robot surgeons and artificial life: the promise of tiny machines - BBC News | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Working with Jim Heath at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), he set about developing a tiny computer chip. Moore's Law predicts the doubling of transistors on electronic circuits every two years or so.

But there has been speculation that the law might be reaching its limits, so molecular transistors could offer a way of extending the growth of processing power in our electronic devices.
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Ripe old age: humans may already have reached maximum lifespan

Ripe old age: humans may already have reached maximum lifespan | Longevity science | Scoop.it
An analysis of mortality and population data covering about 40 countries indicated humankind may already have hit its longevity ceiling, they said.

Average life expectancy continues to increase and more people are reaching extreme old age. But, the researchers said, people who reach 110 today have no greater life expectancy than those who lived to 110 in the 1970s. The age at death of the world's oldest person has not increased since Calment died in 1997.
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New catheter lets doctors see inside arteries for first time | KurzweilAI

New catheter lets doctors see inside arteries for first time | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A new safer catheter design that allows cardiologists to see inside arteries for the first time and remove plaque from only diseased tissue has been used by interventional cardiologists at UC San Diego Health.

The new image-guided device, Avinger’s Pantheris, allows doctors to see and remove plaque simultaneously during an atherectomy — a minimally invasive procedure that involves cutting plaque away from the artery and clearing it out to restore blood flow.
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3-D-printed robots with shock-absorbing skins

3-D-printed robots with shock-absorbing skins | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Anyone who’s watched drone videos or an episode of “BattleBots” knows that robots can break — and often it’s because they don’t have the proper padding to protect themselves.

But this week researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) will present a new method for 3-D printing soft materials that make robots safer and more precise in their movements — and that could be used to improve the durability of drones, phones, shoes, helmets, and more.

The team’s “programmable viscoelastic material” (PVM) technique allows users to program every single part of a 3D-printed object to the exact levels of stiffness and elasticity they want, depending on the task they need for it.
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Robotic surgery tech provides users with a sense of touch

Robotic surgery tech provides users with a sense of touch | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A new system called HeroSurg, developed by researchers at Deakin and Harvard Universities, is set to increase what surgeons can achieve via robotic surgery, using a haptic feedback system to provide a sense of touch. It also brings other improvements over existing tech, such as collision avoidance, to make robotic surgery safer and more accurate.

Robotic surgery, wherein human-controlled robots perform delicate surgical tasks, has been around for a while. One great example of the tech is the da Vinci robotic surgical system from Intuitive Surgical – a setup made up of numerous robotic arms, a console to operate the instruments, and an imaging system that shows the surgeon what's happening in real time. In 2008, Professor Suren Krishnan, a member of the team behind HeroSurg, became the first surgeon to perform ear, throat and nose operations using the da Vinci robotic surgical system.
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FDA Approves MiniMed 670G System – World’s First Hybrid Closed Loop System

FDA Approves MiniMed 670G System – World’s First Hybrid Closed Loop System | Longevity science | Scoop.it
the FDA has just approved our groundbreaking MiniMed 670G system – the first hybrid closed loop system in the world!

This approval is a significant milestone in the history of diabetes management, and a culmination of many years of dedicated work. With this approval, we are one step closer to delivering a fully automated closed loop system.
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Camera-loaded catheter streams live from inside arteries, removes plaque at same time

Camera-loaded catheter streams live from inside arteries, removes plaque at same time | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The impact of ever-miniaturizing electronics can be felt right across the spectrum of technological advancement, but as we are beginning to see, one place where it can have a truly profound impact is in the human body. The latest example of this is a tiny camera no bigger than a grain of salt, which can be fixed to the end of a catheter and fed into arteries to provide surgeons tasked with removing plaque a live view from within.

The buildup of plaque inside blood vessels can lead to all sorts of health problems, the most extreme of which are life-threatening events like heart attacks and strokes. Doctors try to intervene before things get this bad by cutting plaque from the artery to improve blood flow, after first imaging the clogged vessel using techniques like x-ray to size up the job at hand.
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