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We’re all living longer, but longevity increases not benefitting everybody | KurzweilAI

We’re all living longer, but longevity increases not benefitting everybody | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
GDP $ per capita vs. life expectancy for 180 countries. In 2007 everyone lives longer than in 1970 because the health system is better, but in both cases,

 

Global lifespans have risen dramatically in the past 40 years, but the increased life expectancy is not benefitting body equally, say University of Toronto researchers. In particular, adult males from low- and middle-income countries are losing ground.

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Longevity science
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Wellness Resources - Mind Blog: The Keys to a Better Brain

Wellness Resources - Mind Blog: The Keys to a Better Brain | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Growing older is not the same as aging. Everyone grows older all the time, but we aren’t necessarily aging as we do so since, by definition, the aging process is one of deterioration.

But we can actually grow new brain connections and even create new neurons from stem cells as a result of our thoughts. If you want to keep your brain and body healthy, you can start by adapting our suggestions into your personal plan.

The Summer 2017 issue of Conscious Lifestyle Magazine features Ray & Terry’s recommendations for building a better brain. As a Ray & Terry’s subscriber, we are happy to share the full article with you (pdf).

Conscious Lifestyle Magazine offers powerful, practical tools, techniques, wisdom and inspiration for creating radiant happiness, health and healing.

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The Power to Upgrade Our Own Biology Is in Sight—But Is Society Ready for Human Enhancement?

The Power to Upgrade Our Own Biology Is in Sight—But Is Society Ready for Human Enhancement? | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Upgrading our biology may sound like science fiction, but attempts to improve humanity actually date back thousands of years. Every day, we enhance ourselves through seemingly mundane activities such as exercising, meditating, or consuming performance-enhancing drugs, such as caffeine or adderall. However, the tools with which we upgrade our biology are improving at an accelerating rate and becoming increasingly invasive.
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Virtual Biobank revolutionizes access to human cancer tissues

Virtual Biobank revolutionizes access to human cancer tissues | Longevity science | Scoop.it

In a move that could revolutionize the development of new cancer treatments, researchers from the University of Newcastle and the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI) have created the world's first virtual platform to host 3D copies of human cancer tissues.

Until now, tissue samples donated by patients have only been available on request from physical biobanks that are based locally. The process can take a few months for clearance and the samples are usually unable to be reused once examined. As a way of improving this scenario, a team led by Dr Jamie Flynn, Dr Antony Martin and Dr William Palmer has established The Virtual Biobank.

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Cancer killing clue could lead to safer and more powerful immunotherapies

Cancer killing clue could lead to safer and more powerful immunotherapies | Longevity science | Scoop.it
New research could help to safely adapt a new immunotherapy – currently only effective in blood cancers – for the treatment of solid cancers, such as notoriously hard-to-treat brain tumours.

The study, led by Dr Misty Jenkins from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, explains the crucial mechanisms by which CAR-T cell therapy is able to rapidly target and kill cancer cells, and why it may cause serious side effects.
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Scientists interrupt protein partnership that helps cancer spread

Scientists interrupt protein partnership that helps cancer spread | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is a signaling protein that normally controls the growth of healthy cells, but cancer can break the rules thanks to a mutation that allows them to spread and evade detection by the immune system. That makes TGF-β a good potential target to help combat cancer, with scientists recently engineering new T-cells to suppress the protein and track down these cloaked cancer cells.
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Enzyme Plays a Key Role in Calories Burned both During Obesity and Dieting

Enzyme Plays a Key Role in Calories Burned both During Obesity and Dieting | Longevity science | Scoop.it
In a paper publishing in Cell on February 8, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers identify the enzyme TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) as a key player in the control of energy expenditure — or calories burned — during both obesity and fasting.

“There are two important observations that we have linked to slowing metabolism in obesity and fasting,” said Saltiel. “We’ve discovered two new feedback loops that are intertwined to self-regulate the system. Think of it like your home thermostat, which senses change in temperature to turn heat off and on.”
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Anti-anxiety drug found to undo some of alcohol's ill effects on the brain

Anti-anxiety drug found to undo some of alcohol's ill effects on the brain | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) have discovered a surprising secondary function for an existing drug. Tandospirone is used in Japan and China to treat anxiety and depression, but now Australian researchers have found that it can "reboot" the brain to reverse some of the negative effects of heavy alcohol consumption.

Tandospirone, or Sediel as it's known commercially, is most commonly prescribed to combat generalized anxiety disorder and depression. It works by selectively acting on the serotonin receptor 5-HT1A in the brain, and according to the Japanese company that produces it, the drug is non-addictive, non-sedative, and virtually free of adverse side effects.
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Food may influence cancer spread

Food may influence cancer spread | Longevity science | Scoop.it
There is mounting evidence the food on your plate can alter cancer's growth and spread, say Cambridge scientists.

Animal research, published in the journal Nature, showed breast tumours struggled without the dietary nutrient asparagine.

It is found in the foodies' favourite asparagus, as well as poultry, seafood and many other foods.

In the future, scientists hope to take advantage of cancer's "culinary addictions" to improve treatment.

Asparagine is an amino acid - a building block of protein - and takes its name from asparagus.
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New CRISPR method strategically targets gene mutations to correct DMD heart defect

New CRISPR method strategically targets gene mutations to correct DMD heart defect | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have developed a CRISPR technique to efficiently correct the function of heart cells in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). It involves making a single cut at strategic points along patient's DNA, with the team claiming their new approach has the potential to correct most of the 3,000 mutations that cause DMD.
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Mapping Brain Proteins | The Scientist Magazine®

Mapping Brain Proteins | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Cellular factories perform their functions by localizing and trafficking proteins into compartments where they can serve specific purposes. Because of this, a protein’s subcellular coordinates offer valuable clues about its activities.

Scientists can visualize protein distribution within cells using super-resolution microscopy—either by tagging proteins with fluorescent probes or by using antibodies. But such methods are typically not scalable and require researchers to restrict their choice of proteins to a known set.
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Bulk hair follicle germ growth holds promise for treating baldness

Bulk hair follicle germ growth holds promise for treating baldness | Longevity science | Scoop.it

It might not be at the same level as solving world hunger, but there are plenty of people around the world waiting for an effective treatment for baldness. Researchers from Yokohama National University have given new hope to these people by growing up to 5,000 hair follicle germs (HFGs) in the lab, which is the largest scale to date.

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Being bilingual might help save your brain

Being bilingual might help save your brain | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers from Canada's Concordia University have analyzed brain scans from both multilingual and monolingual people, all of whom were previously diagnosed with either Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Their conclusion: knowing a second language may help offset the effects of degenerative brain disorders.
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Low-level alcohol consumption can help clean the brain

Low-level alcohol consumption can help clean the brain | Longevity science | Scoop.it
a new study conducted by researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) indicates drinking in moderation can be good for the brain. The study found that low levels of alcohol consumption can reduce inflammation and help flush the brain of toxins, including beta amyloid and tau proteins associated with Alzheimer's disease.
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First diagnostic blood test for concussion passed by the FDA

First diagnostic blood test for concussion passed by the FDA | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The first diagnostic blood test to evaluate the severity of a concussion has been approved for marketing by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The blood test can accurately and quickly identify patients with brain tissue damage, or intracranial lesions, following a head injury without the need for an expensive and time-consuming CT scan.
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New study reverses Alzheimer's in mice, while similar big clinical trial fails

New study reverses Alzheimer's in mice, while similar big clinical trial fails | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A new study has successfully reversed both the biological and behavioral hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease in mouse models. The research found that slowly depleting the presence of a certain enzyme can reverse the formation of amyloid plaques in the brain. Illustrating the tricky path current Alzheimer's research faces, the study was published literally hours after giant pharmaceutical company Merck announced the cancellation of a Phase 3 clinical trial surrounding a drug that targets the exact same enzyme.
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Huntington's disease provides new cancer weapon - Northwestern Now

Huntington's disease provides new cancer weapon - Northwestern Now | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Patients with Huntington’s disease, a fatal genetic illness that causes the breakdown of nerve cells in the brain, have up to 80 percent less cancer than the general population.

Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered why Huntington’s is so toxic to cancer cells and harnessed it for a novel approach to treat cancer, a new study reports.
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Screening can often prevent colon cancer

Screening can often prevent colon cancer | Longevity science | Scoop.it
March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness month. Have you been screened? Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, but is also highly preventable through recommended screenings. These screenings enable doctors to spot precancerous lesions that can lead to colon cancer and remove them before they become a problem. Screenings can also find cancers early, when they are most treatable.
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Functional human kidney tissue created from stem cells for the first time

Functional human kidney tissue created from stem cells for the first time | Longevity science | Scoop.it
For the first time, scientists have successfully grown functioning human kidney tissue in the lab that is able to produce urine. The kidney tissue, generated from human stem cells, was implanted under the skin of mice and went on to develop into working kidney cells.
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A clonal crayfish from nature as a model for tumors

A clonal crayfish from nature as a model for tumors | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A genome study has proven that all specimen of Marmorkrebs, or marbled crayfish, originate from a single female. About 30 years ago, the original clone evolved in an aquarium. Ever since, the female animals have been able to spread successfully and massively without any help from males, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) report in a current publication. The clonal genome evolution of the crayfish may also help explain processes in tumors.
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Chance discovery reveals eyes could shine light on stroke severity

Chance discovery reveals eyes could shine light on stroke severity | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Gadolinium, a contrast agent used to improve MRI imaging, has been shining a light on brain diseases and damage for years, but now scientists from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) believe it could reveal even more. With the chance discovery of the transparent chemical leaking into and then lighting up in the eyes of stroke patient MRI scans, they believe the chemical could quickly reveal the severity of a stroke without the need for a brain scan.
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New Sema4 DNA test screens your child for 193 genetic diseases

New Sema4 DNA test screens your child for 193 genetic diseases | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A DNA test has just been launched allowing parents to screen their newborn babies and children for a variety of childhood-onset diseases. Offered by genomic testing company Sema4, the test involves gathering a DNA sample via a simple cheek swab that is then mailed back to the company for sequencing.

Newborns in the United States are currently screened for around 34 genetic conditions. This new test, the Sema4 Natalis, is designed to identify 193 different disorders that are all designated as childhood-onset diseases.
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Study: Telomeres Don’t Shorten with Age in Longest-Lived Bats | The Scientist Magazine®

Study: Telomeres Don’t Shorten with Age in Longest-Lived Bats | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The longest-lived bats—those belonging to the Myotis genus—may have their telomeres to thank for their slow aging process, according to a study published yesterday (Feb 7) in Science Advances.

“In the longest-lived species of bats telomeres don’t shorten with age,” study coauthor Emma Teeling, a professor of biology and environmental science at University College Dublin, tells The Irish Times. “Whereas in other bats species, humans and other animals they do, causing the age-related breakdown of cells that over the course of a lifetime can drive tissue deterioration and ultimately death.”
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Brain-Like Chips Now Beat the Human Brain in Speed and Efficiency

Brain-Like Chips Now Beat the Human Brain in Speed and Efficiency | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Move over, deep learning. Neuromorphic computing—the next big thing in artificial intelligence—is on fire.

Just last week, two studies individually unveiled computer chips modeled after information processing in the human brain.

The first, published in Nature Materials, found a perfect solution to deal with unpredictability at synapses—the gap between two neurons that transmit and store information. The second, published in Science Advances, further amped up the system’s computational power, filling synapses with nanoclusters of supermagnetic material to bolster information encoding.
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How ants could inspire a new generation of antibiotics

How ants could inspire a new generation of antibiotics | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A team studying the antimicrobial properties of several ant species has found the industrious insects could help scientists develop new antibiotics to join the fight against human diseases. The research also revealed several ant species that have no chemical antimicrobial defense against bacteria, offering exciting alternative pathways for scientists to study.

In this new study, the antimicrobial properties of 20 different ant species were evaluated by stripping away all the substances on the surface of their bodies with a solvent. This solution, generated from the elements gathered from the ants' bodies, was then added to a bacterial slurry to see if any of the compounds contained antibiotic properties. After bacterial growth was compared to the rate of growth in a control slurry, 60 percent of the ant species were found to have some kind of antimicrobial element on their bodies.
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Dim light may be shrinking your brain

Dim light may be shrinking your brain | Longevity science | Scoop.it
If you've opted to go for low "mood lighting" in your office, you might want to think again. According to a new study from Michigan State University, when rats are exposed to dim lighting for prolonged periods, their brain capacity diminishes. The same could likely be true for humans.
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Bacteriophages Plentiful in Women’s Bladders

Bacteriophages Plentiful in Women’s Bladders | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Resident viruses of the body can affect the structure and behavior of the microbiome, yet scientists know little about the phages—those viruses that infect bacteria—that live in many areas of the body. Now, researchers have shown that bacteriophages that integrate into bacterial genomes are more abundant than bacteria themselves in the human bladder. The study was published Monday (January 29) in the Journal of Bacteriology.

“Because virome studies are much more difficult to do, we know a lot less about our virus inhabitants and how they are associated with health and disease,” says Chloe James, a medical microbiologist at the University of Salford in Manchester, U.K., who did not participate in the work. “It is really important to do these studies to start to fill in the gaps in our knowledge,” she adds.
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