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On Living Forever

On Living Forever | Longevity science | Scoop.it

“Wouldn’t you eventually get bored?” Like clockwork, the question arises when I tell someone quixotically, arrogantly, that I plan on living forever. From the limited perspective of 20 years, even the prospect of living another six or seven decades in full color can be impossible to envisage. Hedging, I answer that assuming a world where radical life extension is possible, there will be no telling as to how different the human experience will be from what we know—that is to say, where 200-year-olds won’t merely be stuck playing very, very slow mah-jongg.

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Longevity science
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Wellness Resources - Mind Blog: The Keys to a Better Brain

Wellness Resources - Mind Blog: The Keys to a Better Brain | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Growing older is not the same as aging. Everyone grows older all the time, but we aren’t necessarily aging as we do so since, by definition, the aging process is one of deterioration.

But we can actually grow new brain connections and even create new neurons from stem cells as a result of our thoughts. If you want to keep your brain and body healthy, you can start by adapting our suggestions into your personal plan.

The Summer 2017 issue of Conscious Lifestyle Magazine features Ray & Terry’s recommendations for building a better brain. As a Ray & Terry’s subscriber, we are happy to share the full article with you (pdf).

Conscious Lifestyle Magazine offers powerful, practical tools, techniques, wisdom and inspiration for creating radiant happiness, health and healing.

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Red wine compounds may help fight cavity-causing bacteria

Red wine compounds may help fight cavity-causing bacteria | Longevity science | Scoop.it
To the delight of those who like to indulge in a cheeky glass of red after dinner, the health benefits of wine (in moderation, of course) are becoming increasingly well-documented. There's evidence that compounds in wine could help improve heart health and even reduce the cancer-causing effects of alcohol, and now a surprising new benefit may have been discovered. Wine may help fend off bacteria that cause cavities and gum disease.
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Study linking sugary soft drinks with cancer rekindles controversial debate

Study linking sugary soft drinks with cancer rekindles controversial debate | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A study of more than 35,000 subjects has found that people who drink sugary soft drinks have an increased risk of developing several obesity-related cancers, even if the person is not overweight. The study rekindles the controversial debate over whether excessive sugar consumption directly contributes to cancer.
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Stem-cell based stroke treatment repairs brain tissue

Stem-cell based stroke treatment repairs brain tissue | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A team of researchers at the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center and ArunA Biomedical, a UGA startup company, have developed a new treatment for stroke that reduces brain damage and accelerates the brain’s natural healing tendencies in animal models. They published their findings in the journal Translational Stroke Research.

The research team led by UGA professor Steven Stice and Nasrul Hoda of Augusta University created a treatment called AB126 using extracellular vesicles (EV), fluid-filled structures known as exosomes, which are generated from human neural stem cells.

Fully able to cloak itself within the bloodstream, this type of regenerative EV therapy appears to be the most promising in overcoming the limitations of many cell therapies­—
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Low-carb and low-fat diets face off in new Stanford study

Low-carb and low-fat diets face off in new Stanford study | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A small, but comprehensive, study from Stanford University researchers has pitted low-fat diets against low-carb diets. After one year the results are in and it's a draw. Frustrating anyone wanting a definitive result, the data compellingly suggests individual diet outcomes are much more subjective than many previously thought.
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New CRISPR Method Takes on Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

New CRISPR Method Takes on Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The advance of CRISPR gene editing technology, which uses an RNA strand to guide an enzyme called Cas9 to cut a specific portion of DNA, has raised concerns and sparked debate as people envision a not-so-distant future populated by bioengineered super-crops, genetically flawless pets, and customized babies. While the method could be used for these purposes, it’s also showing potential as a valuable medical tool, with a seemingly new condition added each week to the list of what CRISPR may one day cure.
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Stanford breakthrough uses stem cells to create possible cancer vaccine

Stanford breakthrough uses stem cells to create possible cancer vaccine | Longevity science | Scoop.it
An impressive new study from researchers at Stanford University has found that mice injected with inactivated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) display significant immune system responses to a variety of cancers. If the study can be replicated in humans this research could pave the way for a groundbreaking personalized cancer treatment that essentially vaccinates patients against many types of tumors.
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"Nano-factories" produce anti-cancer drugs from inside tumors

"Nano-factories" produce anti-cancer drugs from inside tumors | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Cancer cells thrive thanks to some robust defense mechanisms, so finding ways to get past them is a key area of research. In the past, scientists have sent gold nanoparticles inside tumors by hitchhiking on white blood cells, before heating the gold with near-infrared light to kill the cancer from within. Others examined the possibility of administering a "prodrug" that remained inactive until it detected cancer markers, and then began producing drugs from inside the tumor.

The new work follows a similar function as the latter. The Technion scientists loaded molecular machines inside lipid-based particles that resemble biological cell membranes, creating what they call "nano-factories." Once they're activated by sensing the presence of abnormal cells, these particles kick into gear, producing...

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First diagnostic blood test for concussion passed by the FDA

First diagnostic blood test for concussion passed by the FDA | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The first diagnostic blood test to evaluate the severity of a concussion has been approved for marketing by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The blood test can accurately and quickly identify patients with brain tissue damage, or intracranial lesions, following a head injury without the need for an expensive and time-consuming CT scan.
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New study reverses Alzheimer's in mice, while similar big clinical trial fails

New study reverses Alzheimer's in mice, while similar big clinical trial fails | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A new study has successfully reversed both the biological and behavioral hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease in mouse models. The research found that slowly depleting the presence of a certain enzyme can reverse the formation of amyloid plaques in the brain. Illustrating the tricky path current Alzheimer's research faces, the study was published literally hours after giant pharmaceutical company Merck announced the cancellation of a Phase 3 clinical trial surrounding a drug that targets the exact same enzyme.
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Huntington's disease provides new cancer weapon - Northwestern Now

Huntington's disease provides new cancer weapon - Northwestern Now | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Patients with Huntington’s disease, a fatal genetic illness that causes the breakdown of nerve cells in the brain, have up to 80 percent less cancer than the general population.

Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered why Huntington’s is so toxic to cancer cells and harnessed it for a novel approach to treat cancer, a new study reports.
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Screening can often prevent colon cancer

Screening can often prevent colon cancer | Longevity science | Scoop.it
March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness month. Have you been screened? Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, but is also highly preventable through recommended screenings. These screenings enable doctors to spot precancerous lesions that can lead to colon cancer and remove them before they become a problem. Screenings can also find cancers early, when they are most treatable.
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Functional human kidney tissue created from stem cells for the first time

Functional human kidney tissue created from stem cells for the first time | Longevity science | Scoop.it
For the first time, scientists have successfully grown functioning human kidney tissue in the lab that is able to produce urine. The kidney tissue, generated from human stem cells, was implanted under the skin of mice and went on to develop into working kidney cells.
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Surgical instruments may spread Alzheimer’s proteins

Surgical instruments may spread Alzheimer’s proteins | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Sebastian Brandner, at University College London, and his team have been investigating the cases of eight people who developed CAA under the age of 60. Scouring their medical records, the team found that all eight of these people had undergone brain surgery during childhood or their teenage years for a variety of reasons.
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Excessive alcohol use strongly linked to early-onset dementia in massive study

Excessive alcohol use strongly linked to early-onset dementia in massive study | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A large-scale observational study of over one million adults has confidently linked chronic heavy alcohol consumption with early-onset dementia. The strong association confirms several recent similar studies examining the damaging effects of alcohol on the brain.

The massive study examined the records of all adult patients admitted to hospitals in metropolitan France over a five-year period. Some 1.1 million subjects were found to have been diagnosed with dementia in that time and over 57,000 of those cases were classified as early-onset, meaning they were displaying symptoms at ages younger than 65 years. Strikingly, 57 percent of those early-onset dementia cases were associated with an alcohol-use disorder defined as chronic alcohol use or alcohol dependence.

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Two new wearable sensors may replace traditional medical diagnostic devices | KurzweilAI

Two new wearable sensors may replace traditional medical diagnostic devices | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Throat-motion sensor monitors stroke effects more effectively ...


Monitoring movements, not sounds. The new band-aid-like stretchable throat sensor (two are applied) measures speech patterns by detecting throat movements to improve diagnosis and treatment of aphasia, a communication disorder associated with stroke.

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Cancer Vaccines May Overhaul Cancer Therapy in the Next Decade

Cancer Vaccines May Overhaul Cancer Therapy in the Next Decade | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The term “silver bullet” gets tossed around a lot, but cancer vaccines are just that. Unlike the flu vaccines that we’re familiar with, cancer vaccines are slightly different in that they don’t just seek to prevent cancers from forming. In many cases, these vaccines also treat tumors already within the body.

What unites cancer vaccines is this: these agents, ranging from chemicals to DNA-like molecules to cells, all give the immune system a boost so that it better recognizes and attacks cancer cells.

To Dr. Ronald Levy, an oncologist at Stanford University, cancer immunotherapy is the way to go. You may have heard of some of these treatments already. CAR-T, which genetically enhances a patient’s immune cells to better target cancers, was approved last year to treat certain types of blood cancers.
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9 ways millennials are changing the way we eat - The

9 ways millennials are changing the way we eat - The | Longevity science | Scoop.it
If you’ve noticed a positive change in food trends over the last 10 years, thank a millennial. Loosely defined as people born from the early 1980s until about 2004, millennials are the largest U.S. age demographic, and as such they are key tastemakers. Their food preferences are helping determine what you’ll find in grocery stores and restaurants across the country.

Millennials are in college, starting new jobs, getting married or having kids. Right now, there are more millennials in the workforce than any other age bracket, and their consumer choices matter. Here’s how this generation is influencing the way we eat.
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Common blood pressure medication could delay onset, or even prevent, type 1 diabetes

Common blood pressure medication could delay onset, or even prevent, type 1 diabetes | Longevity science | Scoop.it

New research into off-label uses for a 50-year-old drug commonly prescribed for high-blood pressure has found that it could prevent the onset of type 1 diabetes. The promising research also suggests a new approach for investigating drugs that could help treat a variety of autoimmune diseases.

Up to 60 percent of people at risk of developing type 1 diabetes possess a molecule dubbed DQ8. The new study, from researchers at the University of Colorado and the University of Florida, set out to investigate whether blocking that specific molecule could also block the onset of type 1 diabetes and whether there was an already approved drug that achieved this effect.

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Neuroscientists reverse Alzheimer’s disease in mice | KurzweilAI

Neuroscientists reverse Alzheimer’s disease in mice | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers from the Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute have completely reversed the formation of amyloid plaques in the brains of mice with Alzheimer’s disease by gradually depleting an enzyme called BACE1. The procedure also improved the animals’ cognitive function.

The study, published February 14 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, raises hopes that drugs targeting this enzyme will be able to successfully treat Alzheimer’s disease in humans.

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Dads could be passing on genes that advance onset of ovarian cancer

Dads could be passing on genes that advance onset of ovarian cancer | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Past studies have revealed that when a woman develops ovarian cancer, her sister has a higher risk of also developing the disease than her mother. This was difficult to explain, but researchers at the Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center have discovered that a newly identified mutation on the X-chromosome, passed down from the father, may be linked to an earlier onset of ovarian cancer in women and higher rates of prostate cancer in men.
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The Power to Upgrade Our Own Biology Is in Sight—But Is Society Ready for Human Enhancement?

The Power to Upgrade Our Own Biology Is in Sight—But Is Society Ready for Human Enhancement? | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Upgrading our biology may sound like science fiction, but attempts to improve humanity actually date back thousands of years. Every day, we enhance ourselves through seemingly mundane activities such as exercising, meditating, or consuming performance-enhancing drugs, such as caffeine or adderall. However, the tools with which we upgrade our biology are improving at an accelerating rate and becoming increasingly invasive.
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Virtual Biobank revolutionizes access to human cancer tissues

Virtual Biobank revolutionizes access to human cancer tissues | Longevity science | Scoop.it

In a move that could revolutionize the development of new cancer treatments, researchers from the University of Newcastle and the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI) have created the world's first virtual platform to host 3D copies of human cancer tissues.

Until now, tissue samples donated by patients have only been available on request from physical biobanks that are based locally. The process can take a few months for clearance and the samples are usually unable to be reused once examined. As a way of improving this scenario, a team led by Dr Jamie Flynn, Dr Antony Martin and Dr William Palmer has established The Virtual Biobank.

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Cancer killing clue could lead to safer and more powerful immunotherapies

Cancer killing clue could lead to safer and more powerful immunotherapies | Longevity science | Scoop.it
New research could help to safely adapt a new immunotherapy – currently only effective in blood cancers – for the treatment of solid cancers, such as notoriously hard-to-treat brain tumours.

The study, led by Dr Misty Jenkins from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, explains the crucial mechanisms by which CAR-T cell therapy is able to rapidly target and kill cancer cells, and why it may cause serious side effects.
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Scientists interrupt protein partnership that helps cancer spread

Scientists interrupt protein partnership that helps cancer spread | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is a signaling protein that normally controls the growth of healthy cells, but cancer can break the rules thanks to a mutation that allows them to spread and evade detection by the immune system. That makes TGF-β a good potential target to help combat cancer, with scientists recently engineering new T-cells to suppress the protein and track down these cloaked cancer cells.
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Enzyme Plays a Key Role in Calories Burned both During Obesity and Dieting

Enzyme Plays a Key Role in Calories Burned both During Obesity and Dieting | Longevity science | Scoop.it
In a paper publishing in Cell on February 8, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers identify the enzyme TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) as a key player in the control of energy expenditure — or calories burned — during both obesity and fasting.

“There are two important observations that we have linked to slowing metabolism in obesity and fasting,” said Saltiel. “We’ve discovered two new feedback loops that are intertwined to self-regulate the system. Think of it like your home thermostat, which senses change in temperature to turn heat off and on.”
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