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Dietary supplement shows promise for reversing cardiovascular aging

Dietary supplement shows promise for reversing cardiovascular aging | Longevity | Scoop.it
Scientists have long known that restricting calories can fend off physiological signs of aging, with studies in fruit flies, roundworms, rodents and even people showing that chronically slashing intake by about a third ca

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Allen Taylor's curator insight, March 29, 10:39 PM
B-vitamin relative offers reversal of some of the damage of aging.
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Food may influence cancer spread

Food may influence cancer spread | Longevity | Scoop.it
There is mounting evidence the food on your plate can alter cancer's growth and spread, say Cambridge scientists.

Animal research, published in the journal Nature, showed breast tumours struggled without the dietary nutrient asparagine.

It is found in the foodies' favourite asparagus, as well as poultry, seafood and many other foods.

In the future, scientists hope to take advantage of cancer's "culinary addictions" to improve treatment.

Asparagine is an amino acid - a building block of protein - and takes its name from asparagus.

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Researchers report promising pterostilbene and NR clinical trial results » LongevityFacts

Researchers report promising pterostilbene and NR clinical trial results » LongevityFacts | Longevity | Scoop.it
A clinical trial of an NR and pterostilbene anti-aging supplement appeared to be safe and increased NAD levels in a sustained way.

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Allen Taylor's curator insight, February 2, 2:26 AM
First clinical trial of NR seems to show no harm relative to the placebo group. Time for a test of efficacy.
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Type 3 Diabetes Symptoms - Alzheimer's - Diabetes Self-Management

Type 3 Diabetes Symptoms - Alzheimer's - Diabetes Self-Management | Longevity | Scoop.it
Why is Alzheimer’s dementia (AD) sometimes called “Type 3 diabetes?” What are the symptoms, and how can it be prevented?

Alzheimer’s is a progressive brain disease. People who have this condition gradually lose memory and mental focus. They may have emotional and behavioral changes that put a great load on their families.
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The course of Alzheimer’s disease varies dramatically. Some people become severely disabled and die from it. Others may experience only a mild slowing of brain function.

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SENS antiaging progress in 2017

SENS antiaging progress in 2017 | Longevity | Scoop.it
SENS antiaging progress in 2017

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Allen Taylor's curator insight, January 1, 3:39 PM
The SENS Foundation is making progress on multiple fronts.
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No sweat: The smart guide to exercise

No sweat: The smart guide to exercise | Longevity | Scoop.it
Polls invariably cite the most common New Year's resolutions as focusing on diet, exercise and weight loss – which is perhaps unsurprising after the excess of the holidays.

But regardless of our good intentions, most resolutions are already broken come February. Some 39 per cent of adults in the UK fail to get enough exercise – despite gym membership hitting an all-time high in 2017 – and it’s a similar story in many other parts of the world. The price is more than vanity. Physical inactivity is thought to be responsible for 5 million deaths worldwide. So where are we going wrong?

We’re bombarded by specialist exercise advice and workouts that promise unrealistic results in record time, which can leave people feeling overwhelmed and doomed to fail. But if you strip down to the bare facts, things start to look a lot simpler. Just when your resolutions are most likely to crack, here's the no-nonsense guide to the exercise advice you really need to know.

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Alzheimer's Drug Turns Back Clock in Powerhouse of Cell

Alzheimer's Drug Turns Back Clock in Powerhouse of Cell | Longevity | Scoop.it

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Allen Taylor's curator insight, January 9, 5:23 PM
Alzheimer's drug is shown to retard aging in model organisms. Funding for clinical trials is needed to pave the way for use in humans. This would be a great target for a philanthropist.
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Fat fighting drug could let you lose weight without dieting

Fat fighting drug could let you lose weight without dieting | Longevity | Scoop.it
You want to lose weight, but you don't want to eat less – right? Well, when and if a new drug makes it to market, you may get your wish. Scientists from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston are developing a medication that has already lowered body weight in obese mice, even though they kept eating the same amount.

Fat cells begin to overexpress a protein known as nicotinamide-N-methyltransferase (NNMT), as they get larger. NNMT acts as a metabolic brake which slows down fat cell metabolism, so the more of it that's expressed, the harder it is for the cells to burn fat – it's a vicious circle.

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Men Resist Green Behavior as Un-Manly

Men Resist Green Behavior as Un-Manly | Longevity | Scoop.it
A surprising reason for resistance to environmental goods and habits
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I Am A Science Lady's curator insight, January 10, 4:29 PM
Gives a whole new meaning to "Toxic Masculinity".
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The best fitness trackers of 2017

The best fitness trackers of 2017 | Longevity | Scoop.it
A fitness tracker is the perfect gift for the holiday season, for treating someone else or treating yourself – what better way to start tackling your New Year resolutions? These are the best fitness trackers we've seen launched this year, as wearables get smarter, smaller, and more diverse.

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The Enormous Promise and Peril of Bioengineering's Pandora's Box

The Enormous Promise and Peril of Bioengineering's Pandora's Box | Longevity | Scoop.it
We’re standing on the threshold of extraordinary capability in synthetic biology. CRISPR-Cas9, the genome editing technique discovered in 2014, is at the forefront of this newfound potential for innovation. These advancements provide an opportunity to solve problems in food supply, disease, genetics, and—the most tantalizing and forbidden of prospects—modifying the human genome. Doing so would make us better, faster, stronger, more resilient, and more intelligent: it’s a chance to engineer ourselves at a faster rate than natural selection could ever dream.

However, many experts warn of the dangers of these new capabilities. A vast torrent of money is flowing towards biotech startups, and the race to be first can encourage cutting corners. Researchers in 2017 resurrected an extinct strain of the horsepox virus. CRISPR may make it possible to create the bioweapons carefully safeguarded by the US and Russian governments, such as smallpox, or to take an existing disease, like Ebola, and modify it into an epidemiologist’s worst nightmare.

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The Youth Restoring Benefits Of NAD+ - page 1 | Life Extension

The Youth Restoring Benefits Of NAD+ - page 1 | Life Extension | Longevity | Scoop.it
Normal aging is accompanied by a noticeable increase in fatigue and loss of motivation.

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Allen Taylor's curator insight, December 10, 2017 3:24 PM
NAD+ appears to extend average lifespan of lab organisms, but have no effect on maximum lifespan.
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Undoing Aging with Molecular and Cellular Damage Repair - OpenMind

Undoing Aging with Molecular and Cellular Damage Repair - OpenMind | Longevity | Scoop.it
Undoing Aging with Molecular and Cellular Damage Repair is the proposal of the famous biomedical gerontologist Aubrey de Grey to fight human aging

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Allen Taylor's curator insight, December 7, 2017 2:57 PM
The latest word on rejuvination from the SENS Institute.
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Enzyme Plays a Key Role in Calories Burned both During Obesity and Dieting

Enzyme Plays a Key Role in Calories Burned both During Obesity and Dieting | Longevity | Scoop.it
In a paper publishing in Cell on February 8, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers identify the enzyme TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) as a key player in the control of energy expenditure — or calories burned — during both obesity and fasting.

“There are two important observations that we have linked to slowing metabolism in obesity and fasting,” said Saltiel. “We’ve discovered two new feedback loops that are intertwined to self-regulate the system. Think of it like your home thermostat, which senses change in temperature to turn heat off and on.”

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Dim light may be shrinking your brain

Dim light may be shrinking your brain | Longevity | Scoop.it
If you've opted to go for low "mood lighting" in your office, you might want to think again. According to a new study from Michigan State University, when rats are exposed to dim lighting for prolonged periods, their brain capacity diminishes. The same could likely be true for humans.

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Fast food stimulates inflammation and triggers long-term changes to immune system

Fast food stimulates inflammation and triggers long-term changes to immune system | Longevity | Scoop.it

A disturbing new study led by scientists at the University of Bonn suggests that the immune system responds to a fast food-style Western diet in much the same way as it would react to a bacterial infection. As well as stimulating widespread inflammatory activity, the study claims that switching to a healthy diet may not fully reverse the long-term damage once initially triggered.

 

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Ines Jurisic's curator insight, February 2, 5:23 AM

"A disturbing new study led by scientists at the University of Bonn suggests that the immune system responds to a fast food-style Western diet in much the same way as it would react to a bacterial infection!!"

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Alzheimer's Disease Is Type 3 Diabetes–Evidence Reviewed

Alzheimer's Disease Is Type 3 Diabetes–Evidence Reviewed | Longevity | Scoop.it
We conclude that the term “type 3 diabetes” accurately reflects the fact that AD represents a form of diabetes that selectively involves the brain and has molecular and biochemical features that overlap with both type 1 diabetes mellitus and T2DM.

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Gene Therapy Had a Breakthrough 2017—2018 May Be Even Better

Gene Therapy Had a Breakthrough 2017—2018 May Be Even Better | Longevity | Scoop.it
Gene therapy had a hell of a 2017. After decades of promises but failed deliveries, last year saw the field hitting a series of astonishing home runs.

The concept of gene therapy is elegant: like computer bugs, faulty letters in the human genome can be edited and replaced with healthy ones.

But despite early enthusiasm, the field has suffered one setback after another. At the turn of the century, the death of an 18-year-old patient with inherited liver disease after an experimental gene therapy treatment put the entire field into a deep freeze.

But no more. Last year marked the birth of gene therapy 2.0, in which the experimental dream finally became a clinical reality. Here’s how the tech grew into its explosive potential—and a sneak peek at what’s on the horizon for 2018.

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Safety Communications > The FDA Warns that Biotin May Interfere with Lab Tests: FDA Safety Communication

Biotin in blood or other samples taken from patients who are ingesting high levels of biotin in dietary supplements can cause clinically significant incorrect lab test results. The FDA has seen an increase in the number of reported adverse events, including one death, related to biotin interference with lab tests.

Biotin in patient samples can cause falsely high or falsely low results, depending on the test. Incorrect test results may lead to inappropriate patient management or misdiagnosis.

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Ray and Terry's 's curator insight, January 13, 9:10 AM

Our products do not contain more than 100% RDA of biotin. The safety warning pertains to high levels of biotin in supplements.

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New research shows how alcohol damages DNA and increases cancer risk

New research shows how alcohol damages DNA and increases cancer risk | Longevity | Scoop.it

Scientists have shown how alcohol damages DNA in stem cells, helping to explain why drinking increases your risk of cancer, according to research part-funded by Cancer Research UK and published in Nature today.

Much previous research looking at the precise ways in which alcohol causes cancer has been done in cell cultures. But in this study, researchers have used mice to show how alcohol exposure leads to permanent genetic damage.

Scientists at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology (link is external), Cambridge, gave diluted alcohol, chemically known as ethanol, to mice. They then used chromosome analysis and DNA sequencing to examine the genetic damage caused by acetaldehyde, a harmful chemical produced when the body processes alcohol.

They found that acetaldehyde can break and damage DNA within blood stem cells leading to rearranged chromosomes and permanently altering the DNA sequences within these cells.


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Body's own built-in bathroom scales could regulate body fat

Body's own built-in bathroom scales could regulate body fat | Longevity | Scoop.it

Researchers in Sweden believe they have discovered a previously unidentified body fat regulatory system. The mechanism senses excessive body weight much like bathroom scales, signaling the brain to reduce food intake. If confirmed, this will be the first new fat regulatory mechanism to be discovered in over two decades.
 
"Quite simply, we have found support for the existence of internal bathroom scales," explains lead author on the study, John-Olov Jansson. "The weight of the body is registered in the lower extremities. If the body weight tends to increase, a signal is sent to the brain to decrease food intake and keep the body weight constant."


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Cognitive decline may be slowed by leafy greens

Cognitive decline may be slowed by leafy greens | Longevity | Scoop.it

According to a new study conducted by Chicago's Rush University Medical Center, just one serving of leafy green vegetables per day could help preserve memory and thinking skills as we get older. In fact, following such a diet may slow brain aging by up to 11 years.

The study involved 960 participants, who were followed over an average of 4.7 years. Their average age was 81 when the study began, and none of them were experiencing dementia. They got their thinking and memory skills tested every year, plus they completed food frequency questionnaires – these assessed how often they ate one or more half-cup servings of greens such as spinach, kale, lettuce or collard greens.


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Wellness Resources - Mind Blog: The Keys to a Better Brain

Wellness Resources - Mind Blog: The Keys to a Better Brain | Longevity | Scoop.it

Growing older is not the same as aging. Everyone grows older all the time, but we aren’t necessarily aging as we do so since, by definition, the aging process is one of deterioration.

But we can actually grow new brain connections and even create new neurons from stem cells as a result of our thoughts. If you want to keep your brain and body healthy, you can start by adapting our suggestions into your personal plan.

The Summer 2017 issue of Conscious Lifestyle Magazine features Ray & Terry’s recommendations for building a better brain. As a Ray & Terry’s subscriber, we are happy to share the full article with you (pdf).

Conscious Lifestyle Magazine offers powerful, practical tools, techniques, wisdom and inspiration for creating radiant happiness, health and healing.


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Turning pathogens against each other to prevent drug resistance

Turning pathogens against each other to prevent drug resistance | Longevity | Scoop.it
ANN ARBOR—Limiting a much-needed resource could pit pathogens against one another and prevent the emergence of drug resistance. New research demonstrates that harnessing competition among pathogens inside a patient could extend the life of existing drugs where resistance is already present and prevent resistance to new drugs from emerging.

A study describing this ecological approach to drug resistance appears the week of Dec. 11 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Healthy mitochondria could stop Alzheimer's

Healthy mitochondria could stop Alzheimer's | Longevity | Scoop.it
06.12.17 - Using a bioinformatics and experimental approach, scientists at EPFL have found that rendering mitochondria resistant to damage can halt diseases caused by amyloid toxicity, such as Alzheimer’s disease. The study is published in Nature.

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Allen Taylor's curator insight, December 9, 2017 4:05 PM
Defending brain cell mitochondria with nicotinamide riboside restores lost cognitive function in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.