location scouting
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Location scouting - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Location scouting is a vital process in the pre-production stage of filmmaking and commercial photography.[1] Once scriptwriters, producers or directors have decided what general kind of scenery they require for the various parts of their work that is shot outside of the studio, the search for a suitable place or "location" outside the studio begins. Location scouts also look for generally spectacular or interesting locations beforehand, to have a database of locations in case of requests.[2]

Location scouts often negotiate legal access to filming locations.

Suitability of a location to the task at hand takes into consideration many factors, including amongst others:

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The location manager is typically responsible for film location scouting.

The location manager is responsible for the finding and securing locations to be used, obtaining all needed fire, police and other governmental permits, and coordinating the logistics involved for the production to successfully complete its necessary work. They are also the face of the production to the community and responsible for addressing the issues that may arise due to the production's impact on the community.

In Hollywood, they are represented by the International Brotherhood of Teamsters Local 399 and in New York and Chicago they are represented by the Directors Guild of America (DGA) for features and television work. In New York Commercials they are represented by the International Brotherhood of Teamsters Local 817. Additionally, nationwide, they have the Location Managers Guild of America, a non-profit corporation dedicated to the promotion and interests of their members and their relations with the general public, communities and industry partners. In the New York area they have the Association of Location Scouts and Managers (ALSAM) They are commonly associated with production as being part of the management of a show and as such, are generally paid a weekly salary as opposed to an hourly wage.

The salary changes with how much experience a person has and can range from a couple hundred dollars a day on low-budget films to almost a thousand dollars a day on commercials.

Good location managers are well poised and able to think fast on their feet as they are constantly moving, usually preceding production to a location and overseeing final strike and wrap. They are the first and last people the public sees that represent the production and are responsible for ensuring that the location is returned to the condition in which it was received. The location manager is also to be aware of the possible copyright issues which may be an issue if the show is filmed in a public place where there is art work or similar and where the artist has to give consent to the creation being depicted or covered or replaced by other artwork.

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How to Get Into Film School

How to Get Into Film School | location scouting | Scoop.it
You may have all of the qualifications to get into film school, but that is only half of the battle. Knowing the ins and outs of the film school application process is vital to your admission. Following these tips can increase your chances...
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Film | Columbia University School of the Arts

Film | Columbia University School of the Arts | location scouting | Scoop.it
The graduate Film Program at Columbia University School of the Arts in New York City offers MFA degrees in film production, with concentrations in directing, screenwriting, and creative producing, and an MA degree in Film Studies.
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The 25 Best Film Schools Rankings

The 25 Best Film Schools Rankings | location scouting | Scoop.it
Hollywood talent as diverse as Martin Scorsese, Lisa Cholodenko, George Lucas and Joss Whedon got their start at a film school, all of which are named and ranked here on The Hollywood Reporter's inaugural list (comprised with help from industry...
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