Location Is Everywhere
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Location Is Everywhere
Location is Everywhere, How is it Changing our Lives? It affects everything in our daily lives. How do we manage it to live, work and play smarter?
Curated by Luigi Cappel
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Sony patents contact lens that records what you see

Sony patents contact lens that records what you see | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Sony has been awarded a patent for a smart contact lens that would be capable of recording video.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
So what would you do with this if it worked, forget about the technology, that will undoubtedly become possible. When Google Glasses came and went, many people were keen, but not on the glasses themselves, so here's a possibility, although this  particular patent is only about capturing, transmitting and storing images rather than displaying anything to the user.

Obviously the spy industry will be all over this whether its government, private eyes or trolls. It would also be very useful for Police an security industries for recording incidents for use as evidence.

I could see them as being very useful in serous event management, such as on the scene of a crash, an earthquake or some form of disaster where .images could be sent through to supporters whilst keeping the person on the ground totally free to do their work.

It does have a transmitter, but doesn't seem to have a microphone and of course if it had anything like GPS, it would need a massive battery, so it's not going to replace GPS tracking units.

Most sports that use tech like GoPro will be happy wearing smaller devices, but I can't imagine any reason why they would go for contact lenses.

I do believe that one day lenses like this will enable some blind people to see, which is the most important opportunity in my mind. My late grandfather burnt his corneas from snow blindness and was given experimental artificial eyes which allowed hm to see shadows and shapes, but they were big and looked like fly's eyes. That was probably 20 years ago, so the concept isn't new.

I would certainly have privacy and security issues with this concept being used in an uncontrolled way. Whilst privacy is all but history, if someone points a mobile or a camera at you, you know you are being recorded. In this case you would have no idea at all. 

What do you think, how would you use them? How would you feel about other people using them. When Google Glasses first came out many people said they would refuse to attend meetings with anyone wearing them, but today with cameras in pens, watches and our Smartphones it would be incredibly easy for people to record discretely anyway.
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Fixing the American Commute

Fixing the American Commute | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
American transportation is a mess. As the costs of repairs rise—fixing U.S. transportation would cost nearly the entire annual federal budget—and automotive technology advances, cars, often seen as a problem, may be our best hope.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
"Americans spend 5.5 billion hours a year stuck in traffic." Imagine what would happen to the economy if even half of that was spent producing goods and services.

As the article says, the concept of building your way out of the traffic problem worked in the 1950's when America had plenty of money and space. You could argue they still have space, but in urban areas, where everyone seems to want to live, or feel they need to in order to get a decent job and lifestyle, green spaces are becoming smaller and sprawl is getting bigger.

Despite the stories we read about people in NYC that have never owned a car and don't even have a license, the number of cars being registered each year are increasing at an alarming pace.

Ride-share and driverless vehicles are certainly part of the puzzle, as are more efficient modes of public transport, but what about home working, flexi-time or satellite offices? Businesses spend a massive amount of money on buildings and location infrastructure, but not so much on training management and staff to be able to work from home. A simple fact is that many companies don't trust their staff and in some cities there are consultancies being set up to teach them how.

Take Unified Comms for example. It has been around for over 10 years in sophisticated forms and today many people have access to a wide variety of communication channels including instant messaging, VoIP, Smartphones, Tablets and communications networks from wireless to fiber. Yet, this is not being taken into the equation and I have to wonder if part of the reason is that the cost burden is being shared with the employee who frequently are not compensated for increased travel costs, or the costs of providing their own Internet and communications systems at home.

If a modest percentage of people were taught how to be productive working at home, and they did that 4-5 days a month it could have a huge impact not only on productivity, but also on the transport network. Of course there are businesses that need front-line staff on the job, that won't change, but not everyone needs to be there all day every day. It is commonly accepted that a 5% improvement in traffic congestion has a positive impact on at least 15% of the commuters.

With population growth, there is a high likelihood that driverless cars, driverless public transport with shuttle hubs not dissimilar to those Jules Verne described well over 100 years ago will make a difference, but with population growth predicted in many cases at 30-40% in the next 30 years, these are also just short term answers.

Older generations might be happy for a slower lifestyle taking their many years of business problem solving into the country, once they have built the security foundations and raised their families, but population growth means youngsters who will want to be in the cities where the action, the entertainment and adventure lifestyle. So now, again as predicted in Science Fiction 100 years ago we build higher and higher. Skyscrapers become the norm because the greatest growth will be urban.Businesses will eventually realize the experience they are losing as the average age of decision makers drops.

The most important solutions, in my mind, aren't so much in transport technology, but in people recognizing that they have responsibilities, that it is their choices to work in cities. Business needs to become more eco-centric because they are ultimately the ones driving people to commute. Why just as an example do we have big breweries and FMCG manufacturers in large urban centers? When I visited Jack Daniels in Lynchburg TN, they seemed to be fine about being out in the country, so did their workers.

They are near a freeway but not near the sea, they are a massive exporter and half of their staff can walk to work. Why are they so different? I'm sure their staff remuneration costs compensate for transport costs, because the real estate is cheaper and they don't have to pay big city salaries, which are partly high because otherwise people couldn't afford the cost of getting to work.

Whilst we need to adapt our transport systems, the biggest shift that business needs to make is a mind shift. Board rooms don't seem to be very good at that. That's why innovative disruptors, from small towns, or from shared incubation spaces manage to beat large institutional businesses. Those big businesses should keep an eye on the number of old wealth names that have been around for generations that are going broke. It's nothing to do with a decline in product and service consumption.

Getting off my soap box now.
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GPS Helps Solve Dispute Over Trashed Turf

GPS Helps Solve Dispute Over Trashed Turf | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A South Florida man says a Miami-Dade County garbage truck took more than his garbage when it went by his house last summer.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is a great example of the value of GPS data although it took a news agency's help to prove the point. It's a shame that it sometimes has to come to this. Credit to Miami-Dade County. One might wonder about the driver's word though, risking the reputation of his employer by only telling half the story.
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Why restaurants need a hyper-local influencer marketing strategy

Why restaurants need a hyper-local influencer marketing strategy | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The founders of Pizza Pilgrims know a thing or two about influencer marketing.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I was so frustrated with Foursquare, I was an ambassador but they wouldn't let people manage multiple clients and the reality is when it comes to local or hyper-local, small businesses are not tech savvy and whilst some of them understand how to and do build relationships through showing an interest in and understanding their client, they mostly don't know much about marketing, but I digress.

Even simple non tech things they could do would make a difference. If you like what we did for you, tell a friend; could now be, if you like what we did for you tell a friend on Facebook.

If big business mostly doesn't get the concept of mavens and influencers, it's pretty unlikely that restaurants will. I'm not disagreeing with the concept, I'm just saying that most hospitality businesses, in fact most businesses not only don't understand influencer marketing, it's not something they would even think about.

This concept is great in the big cities where people follow people and fads. If they know that a famous person eats there, they will want to go and smart establishments that use this concept have those pictures on the walls (now called selfies) with the owner and a famous guest. The more pictures, the greater the implication of success. Some have autographed prints on the walls of sports teams, but that's not what we are talking about and they quickly fade.

All businesses can benefit from influencer marketing. I learned about it when I studied marketing decades ago. In the local world it's more about supporting local for example the boys who score tries at the high school rugby match  might get a free hamburger and off course the team goes with them. But going much further is just not understood. If marketing companies and consultants can make a business out of that in a hyper-local market, that's awesome. If hyper-local means a street corner in Manhattan, I get that opportunity.

In my neighborhood we have some good restaurants, but they would not go past loyalty cards,provide good service, do a little advertising and if possible stay in business. Whilst they are trying really hard to stay in business, they are not focusing on any innovative ideas. They are focusing on what they know how to do, which is either run a business which is better than working for a boss; or perhaps following a passion, like perhaps they enjoy cooking, or being able to employ and support unskilled family members.

The hospitality trade has a high turnover with many new owners being taught how to run the business by the vendors who couldn't make it profitable. May are owned by immigrants who had to invest in a business in order to be allowed to stay in the country. They do what they know how to do, cook their traditional dishes and throw in a few things that locals are used to.

It's an interesting thought though. Even in a local area, it wouldn't be hard to find personalities who have done well for themselves, identities that  people look up to who would be happy to support local. Sports people, community leaders, musicians, writers, and artists. Maybe that's an idea for the local main-street business association to think about.

How do they make it attractive for their local influencers to promote local business to a wider audience? A couple of weeks ago I saw Duncan Garner do a show on our local RSA in Browns Bay. It became a bit advertorial which I'm sure it wasn't. I was thinking to myself, don't tell everyone what great value it is, but the flip side is, I do want to support the RSA and their restaurant. I do want to support local. Maybe this should be a topic for the main-street groups to think about instead of the same old things that they do every year like decorate the street, run market days and publish local promotional papers.

It's not a panacea but it's a good start. I'll bet that just in my local suburb we have lots of notable people. As to who stops by on the way to or from MERC or Long Bay Beach,  the list would be a mile long.

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'GPS Bullets' Are Helping Cops Avoid High-Speed Chases - Newsy

Transcript: Law enforcement agencies are starting to roll out GPS bullets they can shoot at vehicles to avoid getting involved in high-speed chases. The GP
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Sounds a bit scary at first, but these bullets are GPS transmitters and are designed for use in tracking suspects who fail to stop when required by Police. Often Police are forced to alt a pursuit for safety reasons and they need to resort to other strategies.

These devices developed by StarChase are mounted behind the grill of the Police car and a laser is used to help sight it. Given the circumstances, shooting at a moving target, their hit rate can be improved, but it is helping US Police catch offenders and reducing crime whilst improving safety of all people, including the offender themselves.

Civil rights campaigners have been consulted and say that as long as that is the only purpose they are used for, they have no problem with the technology.

It seems that once again ideas that come from Science Fiction are becoming reality and around 100 Police Departments in the USA have now deployed this technology.
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This Haunting Animation Maps the Journeys of 15,790 Slave Ships in Two Minutes

This Haunting Animation Maps the Journeys of 15,790 Slave Ships in Two Minutes | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Usually, when we say “American slavery” or the “American slave trade,” we mean the American colonies or, later, the United States. But as we discussed
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This use of a map on the Slate platform is very academic and slick. It's worth a watch for 2 reasons. First the way it uses maps. If you pause the animation, you can click on a dot and get the history of the specific ship you are looking at, not just seeing icons moving across a screen.

It's also a very interesting look at slavery. Having visited and stayed at plantations in Louisiana and Tennessee, you get to understand that this is all about people, but you also get the impression that most of it was about the United States, but in actual fact if you'll pardon the pun, they didn't cotton on to the concept of ownership of African people in the very beginning.

I think you will find this map tool and the story they use it to tell very interesting and eye opening.
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This Audi has a beautiful electric longboard hidden in its bumper

This Audi has a beautiful electric longboard hidden in its bumper | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
At Beijing's auto show this week, Audi unveiled its Connected Mobility Concept, a trucklet based on the production Q3.

But with this concept, the vehicle itself doesn't really matter
Luigi Cappel's insight:
At first glance it's, whatever how many people who would ride a long board would be able to afford a new Audi.

Then let's look at the pros and cons If you don't know how to handle a skateboard, put up the handle and you have a serious scooter.

If you want a mobile shopping trolley, load it up and it will carry your groceries and become a driverless shopping basket that follows your smartphone, like a 4 wheeled rat following the Pied Piper.

Great for commuters who can't get a park close enough to their destination. Issues: Is it legal on the footpath? Would you let it on the road? It can travel on batteries at up to 18km per hour.

How many people would be wanting to use it who don't know how to ride a scooter or a longboard? What 's the risk of crashes and injuries?

Kudos to Audi for coming up with a novel solution for the last mile. I can't see this being huge with the usual Audi buyer, but it it could be huge for the 2nd hand buyer!
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Why America's Schools Have A Money Problem

Why America's Schools Have A Money Problem | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
How much money a school can spend on its students still depends, in large part, on local property taxes. And many states aren't doing much to level the field for poor kids.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is not an American phenomenon. It is a global phenomenon. It is almost as thought we believe that education isn't that important. That's probably the same thinking that says we can simply use up whatever resources we have like clean water and it won't be a problem. But according to The Water Project 783 million people don't have access to clean water. It s interesting that some of those are in fact in 'affluent areas'.

What sets us apart from monkeys, pigs and other mammals we have genetic relations to? We have intelligence and ability to solve problems that the other animals don't even think about other than maybe poking a stick into a hole to draw out a honey ant.

How did we get the technology we enjoy today? It didn't grow on trees, it grew by feeding children's' brains with the ability to remember things, interpret them and understand relationships between things. Aka education.

Where does this education come from today? Largely from parents and schools. Does nature and nurture play a part. Of course, in many ways including the air we breathe, the water we drink and the food we eat and exercise. These things all feed the brain and enable it to make connections and people that grow up in areas where their environment and genetics give them fewer advantages often have to work harder than those who get it easy.

There is no question that demographics have an impact on people's ability to get a quality education. They say money isn't everything, but tell that to people who can't feed their kids before they send them to school, if they even get to go to school. Why is it that children from high income areas are more likely to go to university and subsequently earn more money and have a more affluent lifestyle? Are those children inherently more intelligent?

If you consider the positive things we have achieved in the last 200 years, the fact that you are reading this blog on a device made up of a wide variety of materials and  that you probably can't comprehend how it works. Now look around you and think about the complexity and technological magic of the possessions in the room you are sitting in, then think about the education that facilitated that. Imagine what we could achieve if all children had access to the same level of education and the biological tools and exercise/training to allow their brains to function at a high level?

It's ironic that as a creature we are both hugely intelligent and totally stupid. If we gave all children access to an equal level of education and an appreciation for the equality of mankind, we could easily solve the problems ahead. They have yet to make a single AI with the intelligence of a single human being. Yet for the sake of a small sum of money in relation to the Return On Investment, starting with the survival of our species, we still have elitist systems. We will still rather spend money on arms and munitions than on intellectual solutions to our very survival.

The following is a gross generalization but: I have no doubt that one day, those people at he top of the food chain who have the intellect of the wealthy, who will create artificial intelligence's equal to humans, will find that because they left out the emotional intelligence of those with less fortunate upbringings, the only conclusion the AI's can logically come to when there are enough of them, is that the greatest danger to this planet is in fact humanity. Get yourself a HAL 9000. To quote it: "It can only be attributable to human error".

So can we fix the error? Let's start by feeding all children a healthy diet, opportunity for exercise, protection and access to world class education. Even if we can't find enough teachers (if we paid them in proportion to the value of our children's education, we probably wouldn't have a shortage) we now have the technology to electronically distribute education so that we can teach more children with fewer teachers.

Elections are coming up America. Have a look at this map. Have a look at how your money is being distributed. Will doing more of the same deliver a different result. If we continue the way we are, Darwin we continue to be right, but it may not be humanity that sits at the top of the food chain any longer.
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How Uber conquered London | Sam Knight

How Uber conquered London | Sam Knight | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The long read: To understand how the $60bn company is taking over the world, you need to stop thinking about cars
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is a fascinating insight into the world of Uber. It's a 15 minute read, but if you want to get an insight into one of the most disruptive business models in recent times, I think it is time well spent.

There is plenty of logic in the maths of what they are doing and people are climbing over each other to join Uber, from graduates to the unemployed. They don't seem to be making a lot of money, but perhaps they are attracted by the concept of being your own boss.

I suspect that this is the type of business where smart people will make good money for a time and will work their way to owning driverless cabs in the long run. That appears to me to be the long game. You get a truckload of drivers to build a business for you using a very smart Information Technology system, build up a customer base (there are already more Uber drivers in London than there are Black Cabs) and a customer base who are increasingly happy to share rides. I mean, if you had a bus that picked you up at your door and only had 3 other passengers, but was no dearer than any other bus, why would you bother driving, unless you like driving?

Why would you rush into a job where the more successful you are, the more likely you are going to be out of work, i.e. with driverless cars? I don't know, maybe they don't see that playing out any time soon and they don't have the outgoings that normal taxi companies have.

One of the things that I see time and time again is people become very loyal to a concept that they see as helping them achieve their goals once they have signed up. But for the smart ones there probably are opportunities to take advantage of the next wave, after all, Uber typically doesn't own cars, it owns a system, so someone still has to own them.

Can a business with a system and very little in the way of assets become highly profitable? Ask people like Steve Tindall who founded one of NZ's most successful retail businesses, The Warehouse. He built big concrete warehouses, turned them into shops and invited product distributors to stock it in return for a transparent view of their Point of Sale system.

What isn't fully clear in the case of Uber is the end game. It is not drivers picking up customers. In the long term there probably won't be drivers. It is also pretty much the first of what will be a long list of copycats, 'like Uber but better'. It will change the industry, it will have a significant impact on both public transport and on the traditional taxi sector.

I wonder if there is something for the freight industry here. That network is desperate for drivers and yet drivers are going to Uber in many cases because they can't get other work, or want to be their own bosses.

Ultimately with urban population growth, we want fewer cars on the road, especially those with only the driver in them. One way or another society seems to find solutions out of left field. Ways that seem totally obvious once they are on the way, but are incredibly difficult to get off the ground by start ups and almost totally impossible within existing traditional business models.
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Why “near me” is critically important for multi-location businesses

Why “near me” is critically important for multi-location businesses | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
As searchers become increasingly mobile, hyper-local searches are on the rise -- and multi-location businesses stand to benefit the most.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Are you missing out on business? I'm going to keep this one really simple. Go and check out the Google account for your business. Just look up the name on your Google browser AND on Google Maps.

Is it there? Is the information current? Chances are it isn't and you are missing out on opportunities. So many people use this tool today. If you haven't got it already, install Google Maps on your smartphone.

On the opening screen at the top, it now says things like 'Try Restaurants, coffee. I tried it from my office just now and it came up with a variety near me. The closest one it offered me was 0.7 miles away.

Some of them had ratings, many had a brief description, for example The Coffee Club in Clyde Rd said that they were open until 6PM and offered a relaxed chain with coffee and light meals. Chocolate Earth showed as being closed. I hope they were because sometimes this is a reflection of a changed state that has not been updated and you could be missing out on business.

I also saw on the first page a business called Global IT Solutions. I'm pretty sure they are not a cafe and I was able to suggest an edit.

If you haven't managed your business listing, perhaps you have purchased the business, you can claim the business and verify that it is yours and edit the information provided. Don't assume the previous owners had it listed and this is a great opportunity to promote the new management.

This is all free and could generate a lot of new business, especially if you encourage people to rate your great service. At the beginning of summer, my wife and I drove for an hour to a cafe restaurant with an awesome view at Muriwai Beach, only to find it was closed for renovations. I kicked myself for not checking on my phone before I left home.

Just because a service is free, doesn't mean it doesn't represent great value. This isn't rocket science. If you struggle with this technology, ask your children or junior staff to help. Before you know it, you will be listed accurately, even with photos of your business or your specialty dish.

There is lots more you can do and lots of other services you might consider like having a Facebook page, but start simple. You can check, claim, update and start getting business from Google in less than a minute, so don't come up with arguments about not having time.

By the way, this is for any business, you could be a corner milk bar that sells Lotto tickets, a second hand book shop, anything at all that is a destination and you can include the days and hours when you are open so people won't be dissapointed by coming to your business and finding it closed.

You will be amazed how many people are using their phone today to make decisions about what they are going to do in real time. It's not easy being in the retail and hospitality industry today. If you want more custom, make it easy for people to find you.
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Smart clothes peg pings your phone when there's rain on the way

Smart clothes peg pings your phone when there's rain on the way | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Peggy is a smart clothes-peg prototype that uses a number of sensors and local weather information to tell you when the washing is dry and ping you when rain's on the way to prevent you drying the same load twice.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
In Auckland, they say the best way to tell the weather is to look out the window and that isn't always that trustworthy. We are known for four seasons a day, although El Nino has made things a little more reliable this year.
The Internet of Things or IoT is going to change the way we do things whether we need it or not.
You might say that you don't need a smart clothes peg to tell you it is going to rain or how long your clothes are going to take to dry. You might say you don't need a pile of technology that can predict the weather.
I'll bet that somewhere along the line (pun intended) your predecessors said the same about the electric washing machine. They had perfectly good washboards and a bit of elbow grease never hurt anyone, right?
If I was selling this technology, I would sign up with the national weather service and share the information with the grid, so to speak. Imagine effectively having a network of millions of weather stations all over the country.
As to washing lines, who needs one of those when you have a clothes drier?
So how about some feedback:
1. Do you still use a tub and a washboard?
2. Do you hand out your clothes when it's dry or use a clothes drier?
3. Do you ever get caught out with clothes out in the rain?
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Why Transit Agencies Are Finally Embracing Uber

Why Transit Agencies Are Finally Embracing Uber | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Increasingly, public transit is viewing mobility startups as partners, not competition.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Maybe ride-share and new transport suppliers aren't the enemy. One interesting opportunity suggested in this feature is bridging the gaps between transit stations and the  main public transport routes.

In many places park and ride facilities are becoming so full that they discourage people from using the public transport. I have also heard from many people who don't want to walk 5-10 minutes to their nearest local bus stop especially in winter or bad weather, or that the local buses take longer routes to heir destination. First world problems!

If ride share services were to plug that gap, as shuttles from the suburbs to the hubs, they could resolve not only the park and ride problem, but also the cost, if they are carrying a small number of passengers and get the route optimization right. The location based apps that show the location of the vehicles can provide some confidence in customers that the vehicle will arrive when expected.

Services like this add no cost to the community and eliminate the need for smaller hubs. They could in fact encourage more people onto public transport by making it more accessible at an acceptable cost. At the same time it generates more self employment opportunities, at least until these services might be provided by driverless cars. It's an interesting concept that people may contribute to the demise of their own self employment, but  progress means there will always be new roles replacing old ones and there are many new roles coming that haven't even been named yet!


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Hands-free driving on Auckland's motorway - Business - NZ Herald News

Hands-free driving on Auckland's motorway - Business - NZ Herald News | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A driver on Auckland's motorway sits with his arms clasped in his lap in a video that shows the reality of the self-driving car phenomenon. - New Zealand Herald
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I had no idea this was happening until someone told me about this article in the NZ Herald. It does once again illustrate that this technology is moving very quickly.

If we continue to have safe experiences, we could see a lot more driverless cars appearing, much sooner than expected.

I still have significant concerns about things like the ability to see lane markings especially in times like dusk,  even more so on a wet evening, the ambient light and sun strike conditions we experience for long periods of time in New Zealand,  our windy roads, machine recognition and understanding  of speed and warning signs, and especially the random human factor of other motorists behaviour.

Nevertheless, this concept can solve a large number of problems if these vehicles are connected to Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) and to each other. There is a lot of potential for them to improve congestion in rapidly growing urban environments.

I also suspect that Tesla is going to grow as a brand at a pace that will make traditional car brands feel very uncomfortable in their rankings. I predict the growth of many new accessories and safety features in new cars, consequent to their necessity in driverless cars.

I live for the day when people who can't parallel park, or fit their small town cars into car parks effectively buy cars that will do it for them. Not only will that be good for us, but it will also give elderly or people with lesser spatial awareness more confidence in urban driving.

I also hope that when we have more cars obeying the road  rules (because they are programmed to) we will see less people speeding, less people closing the gap on lane changes, more vehicles merging on motorways at the same speed as the traffic already on them, less rubberneckers at crashes, because the cars won't have slowed down for people to have a look, less crashes and best of all, more predictable journeys and throughput of vehicles during peak times.

Welcome to the future.
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Milford company’s GPS app charts the scenic route

Milford company’s GPS app charts the scenic route | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
MILFORD >> Most navigation Apps are designed to get people to their destination as quickly as possible, but now there’s a new app designed by two men from Milford that takes walkers and drivers via the slower, scenic routes.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
These guys could be onto a winner here, the key not so much about being on the long route, because all major nav systems have options such as 'Avoid Main Roads' which could be a great way to see Route 66. However the concept here is crowd sourced information about routes and locations of interest.

For starters most areas have scenic routes, but navigation systems typically don't have them noted as such. All navigation systems have POI or Points of Interest ranging from shops to parks, beaches and public toilets. What they don't have so much of is the really cool places that a lot of people don't know about.

For example, I take a less congested route to work where I go past magnificent beaches, there are many random places in New Zealand where you can see seals, penguins, bird colonies, dolphins, old abandoned villas and other attractions that you might never find out about, just on the side of the road. The concept of sharing rides or walks isn't new of course and there are apps out there designed to give you walking and riding tours for special interests but these are typically localized.

A few years ago my wife and I did a blues music history tour of 4 States. There was no app, there were leaflets and brochure-ware, which is still extremely common in the US outside of the big cities and they were very difficult to navigate. They were fine for identifying places to see, but to put them together into a route was a nightmare which cost me many evening hours after long days of traveling, when I would rather have been relaxing.

A great market would be for people doing road trips. I remember spending an evening with a couple who did a Winnebago tour circumnavigating the coast of Australia. They said that the best sites they found and sights they saw were provided by word of mouth by other people doing the same type of trip. For example they told me about a camping ground they were going to go to in the Northern Territory. They said they were told by other travelers  about a freedom camp on the beach with showers, toilets etc and the most amazing sunsets that they would never have found otherwise. It wasn't on the map and a few miles up a dirt road from the place they were going to spend the night at.

The Round Scenic Route sounds like a great application. If the founders read this blog, I am still looking for an app that lets me log every road I have walked or driven on and by mode. I'm sure cyclists would want this as well.

The idea is I would be highly motivated to be able to say I have walked on every street in the neighborhood and over time I'd also like to be able to do the same, phasing the walk called Te Araroa http://www.teararoa.org.nz/ which goes from the top of the New Zealand to the bottom over a numb of years. I'd like to be able to look at a map on my mobile device that highlighted every road I have been on, not just overlay specific routes which is what apps like Map my Run and Strava do very well.

There are plenty of commercial travel apps out there that are good for tourism in sectors, but they are typically commercially focused, because they are funded by advertising revenue, on advertisers Points of Interest, rather than those wonderful hidden gems that locals and 'off the main road' travelers know about.
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New Program Makes Free GPS Wristbands Available To Ohio Co. Families - EagleCountryOnline.com

Ohio County parents can get help keeping tabs on children or other loved ones who might wander off.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
If you have followed my blogs in the past you will know that I have long advocated for GPS trackers for people with autism and other conditions where they may become lost or disoriented, I even looked very closely at setting up my own business distributing them.

What is really cool about this story is that Rising-Sun Ohio schools have purchased a quantity to provide free of charge for use with children who have special needs.

The frustration is that these concepts have been obvious for so long but it's probably been 10 years since I started pushing for technologies like these to be made available and suitable for he purpose and people who would be using them.
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All Indian Cell Phones To Have Panic Buttons From January 1

All Indian Cell Phones To Have Panic Buttons From January 1 | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Come January 1, 2017. Every mobile phone in India will be fitted with a panic button that can be used by women in danger, Minister for Child and Women Development Maneka Gandhi said on Friday.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I had a weird dream this morning where a bunch of hoods were chasing me to rob me. I hid in a closet in a hall they were ransacking and realizing it was a a dream decided I would wake up instead of seeing how it played out.

As I woke up, I thought to myself I could ring 111 (our 911) but if I had to talk to the call centre, I would be giving up my location to the hoods. I then decided that I would txt someone and ask them to call the Police, That would take some time and there is no guarantee that they would even see the text in time to help.

So the next thought was why isn't there a simple mobile system that isn't easily able to be triggered accidentally like the panic button on my car's remote (which probably woke the neighborhood yesterday).

It should be easy to develop a tool like Facebook Live or Skype to contact Police, activate the GPS so they can find you and view through one or both of the cameras on the phone so they can get a visual on what is going on.

So why don't we have a system like that when today in many places there are as many or more mobiles with GPS and cameras than there are people?
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Cities are the New Nations

Cities are the New Nations | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
“Political geography is not determinant anymore, because cities are more important.”
Luigi Cappel's insight:
It is interesting that for the first time I can remember, I seem to be talking to more people looking to leave Auckland city than planning to stay. Of course we are now one of the most expensive cities in the world to live in. Unfortunately cost of housing is now out of hack with incomes.

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Top 10 American Cities for Working Moms

Top 10 American Cities for Working Moms | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Can one really have it all? We set out to find where in the U.S. a career woman can find the best opportunities for herself and her kids.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
We still live in a world where there is income inequality between the genders, but there are cities that offer great lifestyle, good incomes and some in this list where female executives significantly outnumber meny.

The tide is changing and it's about time. Of course there are parts of the US and parts of the world where women may be seen to be treated as second class citizens. I have seen plenty of that myself.

You do need to take some care when examining these statistics, because there are some lower paying jobs, such as domestic household work that are dominated by women. Taking that into consideration it is interesting that a city like Orlando, with its many hotels, resorts and theme parks, where women earn on average 95% of men's salary. There are programs designed specifically to educate and promote women into executive positions.

I'm just sharing the link and stats here, but I'm happy to weigh in that I work in a business that has many female executives including my own CE and they are all very good at their work. I don't believe that there are many jobs where women can't equal men in performance. I also believe that the mix should reflect the gender balance in society.

These sorts of statistics are available in most countries, so if you are a family and looking at relocating, this may be one of the statistics for cities and suburbs from your national census demographics that you want to check out for a couple of reasons:
1. It will impact on your earning and lifestyle potential.
2. It may reflect on the local societal attitude towards gender equality and how happy you will be living in a particular area.

In my book Buying a House - Using Real Estate Apps, Maps and Location Based Services amzn.to/1RSgyEH I point out a lot of statistics you should consider. Equal pay wasn't one of the things I thought of at the time. You will however find many other valuable insights if you are considering moving to another suburb, city, state or country.
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Pizza Hut turns to algorithms and GPS tracking to increase sales

Pizza Hut turns to algorithms and GPS tracking to increase sales | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Yup, it’s the 'Uber-ization' of pizza, as Pizza Hut joins the wave of chain restaurants embracing tech.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I had an idea many years ago which I called Pizza on the Beach. The idea was that using GPS on your phone and prepaying so that it didn't end up being abused by childish pranks, you could order your pizza from anywhere, using a smartphone app and using the GPS on your phone, the delivery person could easily find you even if you were catching some rays on the beach. Like my old favorite app "Where's My Car?'

Pizza Hut appear to be inspired by Uber in this case with the concept being, you can tell where and how far away the pizza is that you ordered. This is a nice simple feature and really good if someone has to go outside and meet the person doing the delivery, or if you are preparing other things to time with the delivery of your food.

It's interesting how one innovation leads into another. Have you thought of any ideas for an industry that could gain an unfair advantage or enhance their service delivery based on what Uber are doing?
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The driverless truck is coming, and it’s going to automate millions of jobs

The driverless truck is coming, and it’s going to automate millions of jobs | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A convoy of self-driving trucks recently drove across Europe and arrived at the Port of Rotterdam. No technology will automate away more jobs — or drive more economic efficiency — than the driverless truck.

Shipping a full truckload from L.A.

Luigi Cappel's insight:
I sat next to a politician on a plane last week who quizzed me and then told me that driving is the number one occupation for men in the world. The irony is that the industry can't entice young people into the role and there is a major shortage of truck drivers. Young people don't want the work.

They simply can't get enough drivers and that causes major problems to the value chain in business, food, pretty much everything we do. In most countries trucks are the most efficient and essential form of getting goods from manufacturers, and from ports, to customers or the next part of the value chain.

It will be a long time before humans are fully replaced, but given not enough people want to drive these vehicles, right now that also means we are paying too much for our goods and services. As the writer pointed out, trucks are also limited by the safety requirements that limit the number of hours a driver is permitted to operate the vehicle, whilst the trucks themselves would be more productive and efficient if they could be used 24:7.

Solving the road freight problem will have major spin-offs for other industries and will create new jobs as most new technologies do.

When I was at elementary school I was told that my problem was going to be what to do with my spare time because technology was going to replace a large proportion of jobs. So why am I working 50+ hour weeks? We shouldn't be watching these new technologies with angst, we should be thinking about how to take advantage of reduced freight costs and increased efficiency.
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Singapore Is Taking the ‘Smart City’ to a Whole New Level

Singapore Is Taking the ‘Smart City’ to a Whole New Level | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
In Singapore’s “Smart City,” sensors deployed by the government will collect and coordinate data on an unprecedented level.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is huge. In most parts of the world there are projects monitoring data to solve unique problems such as the performance of road networks and demand/capacity management of public transport.

Smart City appears to be the stuff that Philip K Dick's dystopian novels of a society where privacy ceases to exist and the Government knows everything including when people are smoking in a non-smoking area (like the 38 year old man who was fined around $14,000 after being filmed repeatedly throwing cigarette butts from his high rise apartment)  through to all journeys made by every single vehicle, supporting dynamic road toll pricing to reduce peak hour traffic congestion..

According to the story, Singaporeans trust their (one dominant party) Government and the statements being made about data being anonymized such that the 'Smart City' can deal with the efficient functioning of the city in all aspects from health to highly performing transport networks without identifying individuals.
 
Of course they have been leaders in this direction for some time, for example with tolling systems and enforcing T3 lanes using technology to ensure there are in fact the minimum required number of people in a vehicle to allow them to enjoy the benefits of ride-sharing in special lanes. They have even used smartphones to identify the 'bumpiness' of bus rides.

In theory, technology like this has a lot of value in a benevolent democracy for law abiding citizens. In many of my blogs I have said that providing my privacy is maintained, I want a retailer to know that I have a lawn and trees and offer me a leaf blower from their over-stock problem when I am in my car and within 1 km of their store.

I'm even happy (as suggested in this article) for a health department to be able to monitor toilet waste in order to identify the spread of infectious diseases (as long as it doesn't add to my horrendous water usage bills).

You can very quickly see of course where this could go if privacy wasn't honored. Recent battles with Apple for example in order to access data from a terrorist's iPhone are examples where ethics and regulations start getting complex.

There is also the risk of hacking and criminal elements could find all sorts of ways of gaining information of value to them, or of disrupting networks as we see on TV and in the movies. Individuals using recreational drugs would of course have a problem with this technology if a change in government changed the rules around privacy and anonymity.

Imagine such technology in a corrupt society, with leadership wanting to maintain strict controls on their society. Singapore isn't just looking at using this technology to improve living standards there, they want to export it and be seen as a showcase as do market leaders in this technology like IBM. I would welcome this technology in my country, but it wouldn't be hard to come up with a list of countries where technology like his could spell disaster on an epic scale, where governments perhaps represent strong minorities rather than the will of the masses.
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Condition One unveils rugged 'Bison' rig for outdoor VR documentaries

Condition One unveils rugged 'Bison' rig for outdoor VR documentaries | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Digital Photography Review: All the latest digital camera reviews and digital imaging news. Lively discussion forums. Vast samples galleries and the largest database of digital camera specifications.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Whenever there is a new innovative technology, the naysayers come out and criticize. So maybe the resolution isn't great (neither were our TV's for the first 30 or so years), maybe it isn't true VR and that's not the right name for it, but it is the precursor for what will be.

Yes it is better to experience the real thing, but often it is seeing a taste of the real thing that motivates people to go travel. The New Zealand tourism industry bets millions on that and even the3D scenes in the Lord of the Rings movie, brought more tourists here and that's not anecdotal.

Also many people can't afford to travel and only a small number of people can afford to travel anywhere they desire. Many people don't have the good health to travel even if they have the funds. Why would you deprive them of the ability to have a travel experience?

As to whether it is commercially viable, it will be one day and without the pioneering and investment of business we won't get anywhere.

I was having a discussion with a colleague last week about 3D TV and I was saying how disappointed I am that  cable providers are not transmitting in 3D now that so many of us have 3D capable TV's. I'm sure there are still technical reasons as to why that's not happening.

For me, I am thankful for the entrepreneurs that took us out of the caves and gave us the ability to appreciate the world we live in today. A large percentage of them went broke trying to give us the types of technologies that people on this article are knocking.
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Uber mocks Australian state's stiff fines, takes away the Ubers

Uber mocks Australian state's stiff fines, takes away the Ubers | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Imagine a world without Uber? Okay, now come back to 2016. Unless you are in Queensland, Australia.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I arrived at Newark airport on my first trip to NYC at midnight. There was a sign above the luggage carousel saying, beware of gypsy cabs.  I had been traveling for 24 hours and just anted to get to bed in my hotel in Manhattan. I looked around and there wasn't a single yellow cab. There weren't even any staff around, zip, zero, not even security.
A 6 foot something African man in a suit asked me if I wanted a ride and gave me a very impressive looking business card. I said I did, told him where I was going and he quoted me about $75.
The cab turned out to be a Jag and didn't have a meter. I was anxious and asked if he really was a cab and he responded with "Sir this is a limousine service, would you like to ring my office." I did and got a good response, knowing that it could still be a set-up.
It was a long drive and he told me about growing up in Nigeria and how he now had a new life in America and after a very long tense drive we arrived at my hotel and he had convinced me to book him for the trip to JFK the following week.
When I checked in, I asked if that was a reasonable fair and the response was, its right up there for a two way trip, but you've been had if that was one way. They then explained to me what a gypsy cab was. Basically just people in cars with no passenger license, operating illegally and filling a gap. The first thing I did when I got to my room was ring and cancel the return trip!
I like that Uber has a trust concept whereby you can check out the driver and the fare before you book your journey. I like the concept of the drivers being licensed the same as any other taxi driver.
I don't like the concept of blocking a new business to protect an old one that isn't meeting the needs of the people. The taxi industry can easily fight back by changing their business model. Some of them are now putting out apps and before long there will be loyalty systems and more information, emulating the disruptive services offered by companies like Uber and Lyft who are racing around the world faster than the Zika virus. .
Imagine banning Kindle to protect the book industry or banning TV to protect the cinema industry. To be fair I haven't used Uber, mostly because I almost never drink alcohol and have no need for a driver. I use public transport frequently, although not after closing time. I have heard plenty of stories of registered taxi drivers from reputable firms, up on sexual assault and violence charges, so you can't tell me that regulation makes passengers safer.
In fact when you look at the hospitality industry and what happened when they reduced alcohol levels for drivers, it had a profound impact on restaurants and bars who make most of their profit from selling alcohol. Young people couldn't afford to pay high prices for alcohol AND a taxi, older people didn't want to pay the high fares for taxis and there was a slump in the industry. Many premises closed. That hurt the taxi industry too.
Now when I ask people how they get around, the word is Uber. It's not there by stealth or because it is counter to the 'system'. It is there because customers want it and because they feel safe and they feel (most of the time) that they are getting good value.
We are not riding faster horses, this is the 21st century and IMHO this is the century of the customer, of transparency.
Businesses don't own sectors by right, they own it by delivering the services customers want at prices they are prepared to pay.
Even Uber understands that and are planning for a future when they have driverless cars while the taxi industry is still arguing over who should be allowed to drive passengers.
It's all about customer outcomes.
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IBM disrupts the Tour de France with IoT - ReadWrite

IBM disrupts the Tour de France with IoT - ReadWrite | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Dimension Data is partnering with IBM to analyze 198 riders' data in the 2015 Tour de France, looking over 21 gruelling days of cycling.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is the next generation of a concept that started with Virtual Spectator https://www.youtube.com/user/virtualspectator which was a piece of software that allowed you to follow and visualize the Americas Cup from your PC or laptop. It is also now being used in windsurfing http://www.windsurfingnz.org/content/virtual-spectator-windsurfing
 It is a hybrid of Fleet Management software with intelligent map data and the ability to store and feed data when riders are out of reach.
Sticking with sport for the moment, apply technology like this to football and other sports and it will spawn all sorts of new technologies.
For example, imagine being able to follow a camera that automatically has your favorite player in focus all the time together with their play statistics. It could get annoying with things like offside rules if it is capable of identifying where the player is to the inch, but rules could set that outside of the offering, but allow access to the referees on demand.
This is a precursor to the technology which would allow you to put on VR goggles and watch the match from your favorite players perspective through a 3D headset, and then eventually into a VR haptic suit where you could feel impact with each step and tackle.
It can eliminate all those people in so many sports, with wearables, who sit on the sidelines and monitor every movement on a clipboard (these days more often a tablet, but still manual.
For the future though, this technology (with privacy taken into consideration) would allow cities to finally monitor traffic congestion on all modes including cyclists in order to truly optimize urban networks.
 
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Off Camber's Facebook Wall: Not a bad idea??

Off Camber's Facebook Wall: Not a bad idea?? | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The Onion, America's Finest News Source.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Only in America. Of course over there, as I heard in a presentation this week, they can add extra lanes at times just because they can, so why not make good use of them.

As Frank Zappa once famously said "America drinks and goes home." Obviously we want them to get home safely.

I do hope they charge them an extra toll for the privilege.
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