Location Is Everywhere
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5 awesome ways brands are using location-based marketing - iMediaConnection.com

5 awesome ways brands are using location-based marketing - iMediaConnection.com | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
5 awesome ways brands are using location-based marketing - http://t.co/ARN9XdEp, I like the check into airports for free freq flyer pts...
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Location Is Everywhere
Location is Everywhere, How is it Changing our Lives? It affects everything in our daily lives. How do we manage it to live, work and play smarter?
Curated by Luigi Cappel
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Maritime NZ’s innovative digital marketing campaign wins award

Maritime NZ’s innovative digital marketing campaign wins award | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Maritime NZ’s innovative lifejacket campaign Virtual Coastwatch wins 2017 global advertising award.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
What a great example of location based marketing! A geofence that sends message to people that are on the water within 15km of New Zealand. That's a very large area and a great way to encourage people to stay safe on the water.

It's not cool to end up in the water without a life jacket. Congratulations to Maritime NZ.  
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Part 1: Your Car of the Future is No Car at All

Part 1: Your Car of the Future is No Car at All | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Editor’s note: This piece marks the Sightline debut of Daniel Malarkey, our newest Sightline fellow. A Seattle native, Daniel will be writing about issues of infrastructure, technology and energy with a view towards sustainability
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is a timely blog as all the car manufacturers are working out how to continue to thrive and make money despite a push for driverless cars and reduced vehicle ownership through Mobility as a Service or MaaS initiatives.

GM is flat out making driverless cars for other companies as well as themselves and their stock is rapidly increasing in value. Ford, whose stocks are languishing are making brave and credible bets towards a world where cars are just a service and people don't buy them at all. 

Why does that make sense? Wasn't it Ford that came up with a car that every household could afford? It was the horseless carriage and paved the way for a new era in personal convenient and affordable transport. How many people in your area still ride a horse to and from work?

The debate is huge as to what it will look like and it is more of an urban solution than one for country and small town folk who have greater distances to travel and may still need their motor vehicles, but if the cities are where the majority of people live and they keep growing, the current model is certainly not sustainable. Personally I don't believe the majority of people want to own cars. What they want is safe, convenient, affordable, always available, reliable transport that suits their lifestyle.

Perhaps we are indeed heading for a new era at least in the cities, where car ownership goes into very rapid decline. For now we have not yet peaked and demand is still increasing. In my part of the world I suspect that peak is still 10 years away.
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Google Maps Go Beta Programme Goes Live on Play Store

Google Maps Go Beta Programme Goes Live on Play Store | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Google has released the Google Maps Go beta programme on Play Store. The lightweight app has some limitations over the original Google Maps app.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Are you one of the people who doesn't use Google navigation on your smartphone because it takes up too much space on your phone? You might want to check this out for your Android.

The is a lightweight Beta app and not a full navigation app, but it does provide you with directions for driving, walking and seems to have most of the features you might want including real time traffic, public transport timetables, search for businesses and even get their phone numbers. 

If you want all the bells and whistles on a free app Like Google Maps, Waze or HERE you need a phone with more storage and the full monty of any of the , but if you have a low cost phone with not much storage left, this is worth checking out. 
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Would you track your child or bug their phone to keep them safe?

Would you track your child or bug their phone to keep them safe? | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Smart watches that track your children's movements and apps that spy on their phones spark warnings from child psychology and privacy experts, but parents argue they keep kids safe.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
What if your child had epilepsy or some other condition where they might need help? I agree that parents need to maintain trust with their children, however children also need to know they can trust that their parents can help them and be there for them when they need it.

These devices IMHO serve to give children greater freedom and can give parents confidence to let them go and be kids and have fun.
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4 New Problems Encountered by Mercedes Self-Driving Cars

4 New Problems Encountered by Mercedes Self-Driving Cars | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
School buses, Bott's Dots, carpool lanes and speed limits signs. These are four things that pose a challenge to self-driving cars.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Maybe they should test these cars in New Zealand where we have most of these conditions, but unlike most countries we also have a very low solar horizon which means that often the sun will be shining directly into the cameras trying to read the signs. 

I discovered the power of this many years ago as sales manager of Datachecker NZ when our first side scanning installation failed. The reason is that the near horizontal sun was shining directly on the laser overload sensor. After about an hour when the sun rose higher the problem went away. The only reason we discovered the cause quickly was when an engineer in Santa Clara recalled a similar incident in Alaska.

I was involved with an early 3D mapping car in New Zealand and we had similar issues using the imagery of street furniture, using an AI to identify the type of sign and the instructions or regulations that they represented. Easy with good light and a straight on image, but exponentially more difficult under ambient light conditions, especially looking towards the sun. 

Humans find driving into sunstrike stressful and we believe we still have the most powerful computers in our heads, so if we find it hard, an AI will find it harder. Get it right downunder and they might save themselves a mass of test driving.
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Autism Society of P.E.I. helped by pilot project tracker

Autism Society of P.E.I. helped by pilot project tracker | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A month-long pilot project is underway for Island families to test out the electronic tracking system Found to help with people with autism. Charlottetown-based Found Network is looking to build a modern block parent-style system in the city.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Similar in concept to Tile, Trackr and Magpie which use Bluetooth, Found uses WiFi and is as good as the number of other people that are running the Found app.

If a neighborhood was thoughtful enough to band together and get a critical mass of users, then this would be a great advance. This is the sort of solution that would be a really good fit with a community website like https://www.neighbourly.co.nz

What is great is the battery life because it is only WiFi. The GPS based solutions I have tested that use SIM cards would be doing well to get 2-3 days out of a charge and that would be optimistic. 
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Tile is putting its location-tracking tech in all kinds of gadgets

Tile is putting its location-tracking tech in all kinds of gadgets | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Like Bose SoundSport Wireless and Boosted boards
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I'm really interested in tracking devices as you know if you are a regular reader of my blogs. I'm really interested in at least one of the products like Tile reaching a critical mass because when they rely on Bluetooth, that is the only way they work.

Take this review for example on Cult of Mac http://bit.ly/2mwszaq. This Kickstarter investor found out the limitations of being perhaps the only person in Leipzig, Germany to own Tile trackers. As he said, it would probably work great in San Francisco, but not so well if you are the only user.

Why not? Because the principle is that your devices or technology can only be tracked when they are able to connect to other people's mobiles who are also using the technology. So if I leave a device, like my Bose headphones on a bus or on the beach, if someone else who also has the Tile software on their phone is within 10 meters of my Tile enabled headphones, great. If the nearest user is a thousand kilometers away, then, like the reviewer said, "good luck".

If, however there is a critical mass, and if a brand like Tile can get into the production build of common consumer electronics devices, then potentially we have a different story.

The reviewer did note the drain of running location based services on your mobile. I get that and pay the price by carrying a recharger with me most of the time. The problem that I do seem to have more often is that my iPhone SE doesn't seem to like to have multiple concurrent Bluetooth connections. That may be more of a problem. 

I haven't tried Tile yet. I did invest in Magpie, also a Kickstarter project, however they suddenly found good investors and removed their product from Kickstarter, so I am hoping to become a Beta tester instead. Watch this space. The concept of being able to track devices, people, pets and valuables could be a massive deterrent to crime and a real aid to people who lose or misplace things or their loved ones. 

I am really looking forward to these types of devices reaching critical mass so that we can enjoy the benefits. They will be game changers.
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Garmin Speak Plus refresh combines Alexa-powered GPS with a dash cam

Garmin Speak Plus refresh combines Alexa-powered GPS with a dash cam | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Back in October, Garmin revealed its first Alexa-powered device, known as the Garmin Speak. At CES 2018, we're seeing Garmin introduce a refresh called the
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I used to be a big TomTom fan, then when I got my Navdy (that's another story and not a great one) I stopped using other devices, feeling that outside of a HUD, a seperate device was a waste of space given what your mobile can do.

Garmin answered back with the Garmin Speak Plus which sounds like a great reason to get a seperate device again if the maps are good.

It is Alexa powered and for $230 allows you to manage your home connected appliances before you get home, all the hands free functions you would expect but also gives you not only warnings if you drift out of your lane or are following too closely and functions as a dash cam it even compensates for your distraction at the lights and lets you know that the other cars have already left when the lights changed while you were messing with your home climate control. 

These are some of the premium functions that are being offered in future cars, but for a very low price and you can take it from car to car! This is how you resurrect a flagging category. Nice job Garmin.

More on the Navdy in a future blog.
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Rules of the road are destined for a profound change - ObserverXtra

Rules of the road are destined for a profound change - ObserverXtra | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Two years into its 10-year automated vehicle pilot project, the provincial government is looking to clear the way for on-road tests of driverless cars. Current rules call for the presence of a human in the driver’s seat, but that would change under this week’s proposal. With the launch on Jan. 1, 2016 of its pilot …
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This article talks about the loss of jobs for truck drivers of whom there are around 3.5 million in the US, but they don't mention that there is a shortage of truck drivers, certainly in most western countries, so initially autonomous trucks could be used for those industries or businesses that can't find employees to meet their needs.

This will generate countless new jobs. Here's an alternative perspective taken from New Zealand experience.

1. There are many people well past retirement age still driving because they can't entice new drivers. If they invested in autonomous vehicles, they could still provide a service to their customers and enjoy the fruit of their investment in semi retirement.

2. The likelihood is that Vehicle to Infrastructure (V2I) will require 5G telecommunications. We don't have that in New Zealand. Spark and others say they intend to start rolling it out around 2020 http://reut.rs/2mtRT0W. That will require a lot of skilled and unskilled people, so new jobs.

3. The focus of 5G is likely to start in the cities because that's where the people are (and our greatest traffic congestion issues in moving them). If we want Smart Cities, then we will need to support connection of millions of Internet of Things (IoT) devices, from smart traffic technology to systems that allow people to work A³, i.e. Anywhere, Anytime on Any Device. That doesn't much help the freight industry. It will create a mass of new jobs because most of the solutions aren't in place yet, which is why the likes of Microsoft, IBM, HP and others are trying to sell systems into central and local government.

4. Building 5G networks in NZ for freight will be a massive job even once the city infrastructure is in place because the geographic nature of the country with its many hills, volcanic strata, forests and other barriers to wireless communication, there will again be many jobs for skilled and unskilled people.

5. The network will spawn thousands of new jobs for programmers, analysts and specialists in every industry, looking to take advantage of the new networks and Kiwis still have that inventive nature of being able to holistically come up with solutions that can be globally scaled. 

So we don't have enough truck drivers, we have plenty of work for skilled and unskilled people. The big thing is that our education providers from high schools to tertiary need to collaborate with government, each other, telecommunications providers and business in general to ensure we develop future workers to be ready to take o new jobs that in many cases don't even have names yet. 

Sounds pretty exciting to me. The only catch is that this is a massive amount of work, so it's probably a 10 year project jus to get the infrastructure in place, so it's only going to add jobs in the foreseeable future not take them away.
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Electric versions for all Toyota cars by 2025 - Times of India

Electric versions for all Toyota cars by 2025 - Times of India | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
International Business News: At the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES), the company also announced high-level partnerships with companies such as American tech giant Am
Luigi Cappel's insight:
It's interesting that many of the car manufacturers are focussing on MaaS and ultimately driverless cars that are more of a connected entertainment centre than a vehicle inasmuch as people who are no longer driving have more time on their hands to work, be entertained or play. 

 Companies like Toyota are betting on the long term survival and prosperity of service providers like Google and Amazon. We should remember that Google and Amazon haven't been around that long. 

In fact in the early 2000's they said it was a waste of time trying to get into the browser space because Alta Vista had it sewn up. Check out this article from Forbes Magazine. 

Last year Alibaba beat Amazon with 350 million buyers, but that's not the only front they are winning on. http://bit.ly/2CP1Rjy I have no doubt that other companies are also looking to monster this space. 

 Part of the problem for car manufacturers is that they have to plan their component builds years in advance. That's why there are VW's driving around with iPhone 4 cradles. 

 For now Android is king when it comes to mobile Operating Systems, but there are many new open source OS' being developed. Do you think brands like Samsung want to be paying royalties to Google forever? 

 I do think the concept of mirroring a mobile screen to the entertainment system in a car is a good idea, but car brands also want to be unique. They don't want a level playing field so their infotainment systems will continue to be to some degree proprietary. 

 This is going to be very interesting space and I like to see the Japanese being innovative. Sometimes it seems as though they remain more creative as engineers than as out of the box thinkers. I remember in the 90's when I first started to visit Japan several times a year and share ideas, they used to think I was an upstart and asked me who I thought I was telling them what customers wanted from them. 

They used to tell me to find better (i.e. less demanding) customers. However when they started winning massive business deals based on product modifications I suggested, they changed their attitude, but it was hard won. 

I suspect the top cars in 2025 may not even be brands we recognise at all today. I really like the saying, 'There are those who make things happen, those who watch things happen and those who wonder what happened.'
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Mastercard, HERE Technologies Partner For MaaS | PYMNTS.com

Mastercard, HERE Technologies Partner For MaaS | PYMNTS.com | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Mastercard and HERE Technologies have announced a collaborative effort to create a connected car mobile payment experience for consumers who are on the move.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I have a couple of questions. One is about Mastercard, when I used to have it, no one wanted to take it because like Diners and Amex, the commissions were higher than Visa. Second is about driver distraction. If a key feature is the ability to pay while driving, is that a good thing. What would you want to pay for from a moving vehicle?
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GPS 'meddling' hikes Moscow taxi bills

GPS 'meddling' hikes Moscow taxi bills | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Taxi users are facing inflated fares because their position has been wrongly located thousands of miles away.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is the risk of relying on GPS as the only part of a solution. Assisted GPS or new land based systems will have to become more integrated to ensure that situations like this don't happen. 

Developers need to take this into consideration when creating new systems. As to ships, isn't that why there is always an officer on watch. It should be pretty obvious that you can't have moved a thousand nautical miles in 15 minutes. 

There should also be technology that can tell where jamming signals come from. Of course if they originate from the State, that's another story.
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Volkswagen and NVIDIA to Infuse AI into Future Vehicle Lineup

Volkswagen and NVIDIA to Infuse AI into Future Vehicle Lineup | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
CES — Volkswagen and NVIDIA today shared their vision for how AI and deep learning will shape the development of a new generation of intelligent Volkswagen vehicles using the NVIDIA DRIVE™ IX platform to create new cockpit experiences and improve safety.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
None of this is particularly new, but like most great ideas, they take a good 10 years from gestation to the time the market is ready to start trying them out. Even from CES to market takes time.

Some of the concepts like gesture control are features I already have in my car, for example I use gestures to control my Navdy HUD. With voice control however, I have yet to find a device or service that can hear through my music, engine noise, in-car conversations or other sounds to determine whether I was even talking to my phone or device, let alone giving it a command. Sometimes it will randomly start ringing someone. I'd hate to think that my car misinterprets a conversation and suddenly decides to drive me to a new destination.

I'm keen to hear from people who use Amazon Echo or Google Home in a busy environment and see how well they perform for them.

Monitoring the face, particularly the eyes is something German car manufacturers and OEMs have been working on for years. It's a great idea, especially for long haul truck drivers, but I wonder if it might be considered overly intrusive in a conventional car. It's a great concept to see if someone is falling asleep, but I wonder if technologies like Deep Learning still have a long way to go before they can interpret the driver's needs based on looking at their face. 

Even simple facial gestures (living in a highly varied multicultural society) are quite different from one group to another and even between genders. AI may well get there as it learns about individuals, but I suspect that will take time and be risky for many years. We will hear stories like crashes where the driver blames the GPS (instead of looking out of their windscreen). There will be a lot of water under the bridge (and hopefully not in the car) before some of these technologies catch up to their hype.

But make no mistake. Eventually they will.


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Robbed golfer calling for law change - News, Crime - Times

Robbed golfer calling for law change - News, Crime - Times | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A golfer is calling for a law change after learning police couldn’t retrieve his stolen items – despite being able to track their exact location. Tom Owen had his golf bag stolen, containing $2000 worth of equiptment, on December 15th from Howick Golf Course at Musick Point. “They took everything, all my clubs, my bag, …
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is the second story of this kind that I've read in the last week. In the last one, they couldn't pinpoint the exact location of the stolen goods between a small number of houses. It's not unfair in that situation that Police can't enter perhaps 3 houses and search them without evidence of a crime. Most people wouldn't want their home entered and searched in the interest of proving their innocence.

In this case I wonder if the outcome could have been different, not from the perspective of the law, but if you were using a service like Where's My iPhone, one of the things you can do is make the phone or iPad make a really loud noise that only you can turn off.

Now I don't know whether Mr Owen had an iPhone, or if he knew about that feature of the built in app. I also don't know if Police would be permitted to enter the house if he was with them or in contact with them prior to approaching the house and then set off the alarm to prove the mobile was in there.

It would be interesting if under those circumstances, being able to prove using the alarm that the mobile was in fact in that house, the Police would have the right of entry on the basis of quality evidence that a crime may have been committed. Of course you would have to be able to prove that you own the mobile, because the occupants of the house could claim they bought or found the mobile. 

Frequently in the US in cases like this, where GPS tracking is used to locate stolen goods they also find items from other thefts or burglaries. 

Given that more and more tracking devices are going on the market specifically to help track stolen goods, it is in the interests of everyone to come up with a clear and fair set of rules around how and when they can be used. Otherwise, as in this case, it just adds to the frustration, or risk taking by the victim, which could be very dangerous.

This will also help ensure that GPS tracking devices are fit for purpose. At the very least, people should know more about how to use applications like Where's My iPhone, so that they can provide evidence as opposed to suspicion.
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DOT Using Waze For Safety Research | Go By Truck Global News

DOT Using Waze For Safety Research | Go By Truck Global News | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The Department of Transportation is teaming up with the popular navigation app Waze on a new initiative designed to make the nation’s roads safer,
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is a huge credibility boost for Waze in the Government sector. USDOT is working on a new initiative with Waze to dive into their big data pool to research the ability to integrate their own crash incident database with that of Waze.

One of the projects is looking into crowdsourced data to see "if it is a “reliable, timely indicator” of traffic crashes and crash risk"

Many minor crashes are never reported and having access to a combined database of their own information and open source data provides a much wider sample of data that can help to better understand driver behaviour around incidents and verify at risk locations. 

A growing number of DOT's around the US are also collaborating with Waze in providing them with real time traffic information, which is then made freely available to Waze and Google Maps users.
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Denver’s $12 million smart-tech test program to unsnarl traffic, improve pedestrian safety poised for approval Tuesday

Denver’s $12 million smart-tech test program to unsnarl traffic, improve pedestrian safety poised for approval Tuesday | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A four-year program aims to lay serious groundwork for Denver's connected-vehicle future by experimenting with rerouting of freight truck traffic, wireless pedestrian signals and the connection of city fleet vehicles.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
2 Years ago Denver applied for access to a USDOT fund to develop innovative transport management programs. They didn't get the funding but preparing the bid convinced them that they should start innovating anyway.

They have a number of initiatives, one which I think is great is being able to communicate with freight vehicles, using information from the Denver Department of Works about planned and live roadworks, to reroute the heavy vehicles such that they are able to avoid those areas where they would otherwise be slowed down and add to the traffic congestion. 

Like many DOT's and transport departments around the world they are investing in camera technology to improve safety at pedestrian crossings by being able to identify people when the are using the crossings and making sure they have safe passage before allowing vehicle traffic to start moving again.

These are both examples of great initiatives that will reduce pedestrian injuries and traffic congestion in key areas, improve safety for roadside workers and hopefully positively impact Denver's GDP. Other parts of the world will also learn from their experience as some of this technology in some shape or form will become the norm in future.
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Mobility as a Service: the key to seamless travel chains?

Mobility as a Service: the key to seamless travel chains? | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Kaj Pyyhtiä, co-founder of MaaS Global, talks to Keith Barrow. NEW legislation comes into effect in Finland this month, which sets an international precedent for the availability of data on transport services. Through its Act on Transport Services
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I'm not sure how the Finnish way of dealing with this awesome opportunity would sit politically with all countries, but there is no denying that it is working and that Finland continues to be a world leader in MaaS.

Two things that really excite me about this concept are:

1. In order to participate in this Mobility as a Service network, a transport provider has to open their API and their data. That has dramatic implications to the optimisation of traffic demand on the network and creates a level playing field to all comers.

2. Transport providers have to allow third parties to sell their services. That could mean that a Government agency could offer a transport app for its citizens, or a new start up could create fantastic transport apps without owning any vehicles or employing drivers themselves. A public transport provider could augment its gaps by engaging other providers, for example if they suddenly need greater capacity, or to use last mile providers instead of building ever larger park and rides.

Examples of outcomes for this model include:
-Solutions could be developed for specific industries and could be merged with different features. For example hospitality, events, tourism, shopping, students, senior citizens, mobility impaired. I could easily write pages on how this would work, creating thriving communities.
-Transport operators who need additional services could effectively enable customers to use a different provider, potentially even subsidise them when appropriate, for example employ other service providers that aren't profitable for their larger vehicles, or during times of reduced demand..
-Traffic Demand Management by Transport Control Centers and DOT's would be supported with lots of free real time flow and congestion data.
-All of the transport service providers would benefit from an ecosystem that encourages collaboration whilst still having the ability to promote their own unique value proposition. This almost goes back to the good old days of trucking companies on the phone looking for backhaul opportunities instead of driving empty trucks back to base. Exciting new capacity sharing models could massively reduce freight costs at a technology level that is user friendly for people who aren't necessarily tech savvy in an industry that is desperately short of drivers. 
-The services would have to be competitive either by cost or the quality/relevance of the service they provide to their customers. It creates a transparency and trusted environment where the customer will decide what level of service they require.
-It facilitates all sorts of new ventures for moving people and products on the network. 
-It can open up cities and countries in ways that we have never experienced before, without having to necessarily redesign those cities. 

The core focus is on providing attractive and economic ways to get people to leave their cars at home, perhaps to in future not even feel the need to own them at all. This creates a healthy and attractive work and life environment for modern cities that can thrive.

There is already evidence that more people are leaving their cars at home and using public transport, often combined with last mile private services, as well as other options through Maas apps. 

The key is around open sourcing apps and data, something that other cities and countries have struggled to encourage as legacy businesses are more fearful of the competition rather than understanding the opportunity of collaborating in a homogeneous environment. Not all cities or countries can easily force a model like this under legislation. 

The change is going to come, the difference is the time it takes. Even for innovative Finland it has taken 10 years (a typical length of time for disruptive innovation) to get to this point. As futurists we understand these things take time. Customers tend to see the outcome, but like an iceberg, all they see is the tip,  but not how much effort and work went into building the foundation that stops it from melting. 

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Dutch Company Introduces Autonomous Electric Barge In Europe

Dutch Company Introduces Autonomous Electric Barge In Europe | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Dutch company Port Liner will introduce an autonomous electric barge in August. The battery is self contained and can be charged on shore using renewable energy.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I was having a discussion the other day about how little credit The Netherlands gets for its innovation. Yet here they are again with an electric, clean, autonomous transport model that could remove 23,000 diesel trucks from regional roads.

Of course much of their electricity is green as well, derived from solar panels and wind farms, no burning fossil fuels to generate power. 

They even have a nice model where the battery is self contained and could be swapped out, allowing these barges to operate without any lengthy charging delays.
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West Side Rag » Would Congestion Pricing Cause an Influx of Out-Of-Town Parkers on the UWS?

West Side Rag » Would Congestion Pricing Cause an Influx of Out-Of-Town Parkers on the UWS? | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is already a common occurrence without congestion taxes, where public transport users drive to the last or cheapest section where they can get a free park. They frequently block residential areas with the consequence that often locals complain that they can't invite friends over for lunch because they can't get parks.

I had an experience 2 years ago where a church had to put cones out at 4AM so that a hearse could get a park for a funeral that morning. 

For every action there is a reaction and these need to be considered when considering congestion taxes such that we aren't replacing one problem with another.
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Hong Kong to provide real-time traffic info

Hong Kong to provide real-time traffic info | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Chief executive Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor said the government is planning to provide real-time traffic information for motorists in future.
In her remarks at a summit today, the Hong Kong leade
Luigi Cappel's insight:
It's interesting that a lot of countries look towards Hong Kong as the country that got the traffic problem sorted, particularly with the stick of toll roads and congestion taxes. 

Yet here they looking at providing real travel information to motorists as being a top priority and the one that I think is really interesting is providing real time car park availability direct to the motorists "enabling drivers to receive parking space information from public car parks without unnecessarily circulating on roads" according to Chief Executive Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor in this story from a speech at the Hong Kong Innovation Summit yesterday.

This shouldn't even be newsworthy given that international research has frequently stated that up to 30% of urban traffic is people driving in ever increasing circles looking for a car park. Yet what are cities doing about it?

When I was preparing for a presentation to the Nea Zealand  Parking Association https://www.nzparking.com/ some years ago, I asked managers of a number of privately owned car park companies why they didn't let people know when their car parks were full. Their response was typically that they didn't want to miss out on the possibility of someone leaving at the time someone else was looking. They want maximum occupancy and it's great money!

I thought that was pretty short sighted and that they would be better off developing loyalty programmes using solutions such as from New Zealand parking solutions companies like Frog Parking https://frogparking.com/ who had to go offshore to secure the future of their innovative Kiwi business, having struggled to win sufficient business locally.

Whilst we seek to reduce the number of people driving into the cities, what if they had location based services guiding them directly to available car parks in real time? 

What would a 30% reduction in urban traffic look like in any major city in the world? We can bank on driverless cars in the future, but as long as we expect most people to work in CBD's, those cars will go from our traditionally owned vehicle, used 5% of the time, to vehicles being used most of the time. If the owners have their way, they will drive 24:7, just as the owners of car parks want 100% occupancy. I wonder if that will reduce urban traffic, or encourage more people to use Mobility as a Service and increase the urban working population. 

If those vehicles average being on the road say 65% of the time (sometimes we sleep), will we actually have less traffic in the cities? Will people prefer driverless cars to larger capacity buses and trains? Will the convenience increase urban working populations? Is that best for our countries?

I welcome your feedback. I know a lot of my readers have opinions on this.
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Forget Siri - Mercedes claims 'historical' leap for in-car tech

Forget Siri - Mercedes claims 'historical' leap for in-car tech | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This looks and sounds awesome. Mercedes has long been at the forefront of new technology and of course safety is one of the things that they have been a market leader in.

But, while they seem to have every means covered with their MBUX that you might want to use to interact with the computers and the outside world AND they are bringing it to all models, even the cheapest (and even models for Australia as the article says!) I still have concerns about driver distraction. 

Any time you have an interaction, whether it is looking for a gas station or infotainment, you are thinking about something other than what you see on the road. Given humans are not as good as we think at multitasking and the emotional incentives to do something other than drive (especially when you are in congested traffic) there has to be some increased risk. Check out this article from The Guardian http://bit.ly/2D6mfzM which quotes research that people who used the phone while driving were twice as likely to miss compulsory Stop signs. 

The same article stated that even using a hands free phone, it takes longer for people to brake for an emergency and halves the information people are aware of. That's just the phone. This system is far more sophisticated and gives you access to pretty much any information you might want. 

Of course we are demanding these services and reading this article I might trust Mercedes to provide them in safer modes than some other car manufacturers, they are still providing distraction. It's very cool that you can use a mouse type device by the gear shift, swipe, pinch, zoom on the 10 inch touchscreen and talk to your car. The challenge is the incentive to use it at all, especially while you are driving. Current laws will not be able to prohibit you from using these systems. I guess if you were going to crash, the Mercedes will be one of the safer cars to crash in, but what about the other vehicles, or the kid who ran out from in front of a school bus?

I do love the concept that you can say the car is a bit warm and it will automatically reduce the climate control temperature by a couple of degrees and I love gadgets. Perhaps that's the real problem. Provide me with gadgets and I will be tempted to use them when I shouldn't. 
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EVEConnect and Home Connect Unite Car and HomeWith EVEConnect and Home Connect, Consumers Will Enjoy the Convenience of On-the-Go Access to Their Connected Home Appliances

EVEConnect and Home Connect Unite Car and HomeWith EVEConnect and Home Connect, Consumers Will Enjoy the Convenience of On-the-Go Access to Their Connected Home Appliances | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
OTTAWA, Jan. 11, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Evolved Vehicle Environment’s (EVE) product EVE for Tesla (teslaapps.net/en/partners/bosch), the most advance
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Did you always want a car with electric windows? Did you always want a car that can start your robovac?

So tell me, if you really want to know if you left your coffee machine running (haven't you got a Nespresso yet?) or left your stove on, would you want to do it from your car, or from the ubiquitous mobile that you have with you all the time.

The argument for car sharing is that 95% of the time you are not in your car. Ergo you would only be able to use this app 5% of the time. Of course you wouldn't do it while you are driving unless your car was fully autonomous, because that would e dangerous and illegal. 

Why would you wait to buy a Tesla once the service is available (because you were going to buy a Tesla anyway, right?) and set up a distracting button on your dash for your coffee machine, when you can have the mobile app on your phone today. 

That's right, you can have Home Connect on your mobile right now from Google Play at http://bit.ly/2Dk57nU. Then you can use it any time, anywhere. You could have landed at an airport on the other side of the world and you can still make sure you set the timer on the night lights and the stove is off, you won't have to wait until you get back to your car in two weeks.

We are entering a connected world, and the IoT of things will mean that we can connect anything to anything, but I don't want to connect everything to my car. Even the things I want my car to do, like open the garage door when I come in the driveway, turn on the heat pump when I am 15 minutes from home on a winter's night. I will be able to do that from my mobile anyway.

Will you factor features like Home Connect into your new car purchase? Will it influence your decision about which car you will buy? I'd really appreciate your feedback.
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MaaS demo suggests subscription-based car access is edging closer

MaaS demo suggests subscription-based car access is edging closer | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Spireon's MaaS demo uses an open source platform which will supply customers with an innovative alternative to purchasing or leasing cars from dealerships…
Luigi Cappel's insight:
MaaS solutions like this could be the saviour of car dealers if people no longer want to own vehicles. It would require a serious partnership with car manufacturers and of course dealers won't want to give up on car sales until they reach a critical mass. A manufacturer that supports their dealerships with both models early, could easily take a lead.

Of course if a new entrant like Google or Amazon really wants the market they will be a tough competitor. The difference being that car manufacturers and dealers sell boxes and accessories. Brands like Google and Amazon are already service providers and may understand that market better.

There could be big winners and big losers depending on the philosophy of the boards. Will they hedge their bets or will some brands go all in?
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Casio's solar-powered GPS watch is ideal for survivalists

Casio's solar-powered GPS watch is ideal for survivalists | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Casio's beloved line of G-Shock timepieces is widening to include the new GPR B-1000, a GPS-equipped timepiece that could just save your life. The watch
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is very cool. Casio have always been a great innovator and the G-Shock is one of the enduring products that keeps getting reinvented.

I remember when I was told of the Muslim Prayer Watch which told people which direction Mecca was in and gave people warning of when prayer time was. I thought this was a waste of time, but I believe they sold about a million of this model in the first month!

I didn't think the solar panel would be effective on such a small footprint, but clearly it is and whist it only provides enough charge for the GPS, it will make this a popular watch for trampers, climbers, hunters and other outdoors types. I also love the wireless charging. 

I stopped using my Android watches because the batteries don't last very long and I don't care enough about the features to wear a watch most of the time, but if I had wireless charging I might think again. One of my watches has a magnetically coupled charger, which isn't too bad, but it is an older model without a touchscreen. So I'm a geek, lol.

I suspect that the GPS feature will end up on other models as well such as sailing and aviation watches. Wireless charging for devices is essential whether it is mobile phones, watches or GPS trackers. One of the fatal flaws of GPS trackers in particular for elderly people is that they aren't super easy to plug in. 
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Dover Police launch new crime mapping app

Dover Police launch new crime mapping app | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The Dover Police Department has launched a new platform that will give the city's residents real time updates on crime in their area and will allow them to get involved by easil
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Thinking of buying or moving to a new home. One of the chapters in my Kindle book Buying a House - Using Real Estate Apps, Maps and Location Based Services https://www.amazon.com/Buying-House-Estate-Location-Services-ebook/dp/B00FMIB6LW ; is specifically about this topic. Crime Mapping.

Great to see the Dover Police Department supporting another one of these initiatives. Often people moving to another part of town, or even a new city or state have no idea about the neighborhoods. Imagine committing to a new house but not being aware that it is in a neighborhood that has a lot of crime. What sort of crime is it? Is it somewhere safe for your family, your children?

My first home was the best we could afford. It seemed perfect. A quarter acre section backing onto a fruit orchard. We didn't know the next door neighbors were affiliated with a gang and that they had 11 kids of whom 3 or 4 were in jail at any given time and that when they were incarcerated, the grandchildren stayed next door to us. That involved solvent bags being thrown over the fence, loud parties, young men frequently jumping from our neighbors fence into our property and over the next fence into their place, perhaps making an escape after committing a crime, certainly scaring us and our kids.

It involved regular police visits next door and our house getting burgled. As you probably know, many burglaries are committed by locals who know people's patterns, like do they work during the day and leave the house conveniently empty? 

I traveled a lot for my job and was out of town on business trips 1 week in three. When a woman was raped and murdered on one end of the street and a shift worker was driven off the road, dragged out of his car and killed in a fit of road rage at the other end, both in the same week, we knew it was time to move. The problem was we (mostly the bank) owned the house! We couldn't just give notice to a landlord.

This type of location based service was not available then, but I sure would want to use it now after that experience. The thing is that this is one of many things that people would not think of when viewing a house unless the read about it in a book, or were advised by someone else with more experience. They would have simply seen a tidy house with loads of room for kids to play in and for entertaining.

This is just one of many reasons why I wrote and published the book, because today there are so many apps and services that can help you make a smarter decision when buying a new house or moving to a new area. Things like, is it safe? Are the people there like me? Do they have similar jobs, incomes, education, families, what are the common demographics? 

Get just one thing wrong and you could have invested in your worst nightmare. The good news is that where departments like the Dover Police support apps that give you this information, you can either calculate the risks of moving in, or if you are in, use the system to make your neighborhood a safer place.
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