Location Is Everywhere
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What the next-gen GPS satellite upgrade means for you - ITworld.com

What the next-gen GPS satellite upgrade means for you - ITworld.com | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
What the next-gen GPS satellite upgrade means for youITworld.comThese "Block III" satellites are part of a $5.5 billion upgrade to GPS, a government-run system that consumers rely on for directions on their phones, cars and standalone navigation...
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Location Is Everywhere
Location is Everywhere, How is it Changing our Lives? It affects everything in our daily lives. How do we manage it to live, work and play smarter?
Curated by Luigi Cappel
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New Seat Leon concept car can sense drunk or drugged drivers | Autocar

New Seat Leon concept car can sense drunk or drugged drivers | Autocar | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
New safety technology could help to reduce accidents caused by myriad factors including speeding, distraction or not wearing a seatbelt
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I remember when my friends first launched Snitch car tracking in New Zealand. There were two particular market segments they were targeting. One was the car enthusiast that doesn't want their car stolen because it is a collector's car or their had done a lot of restoration or other work on it. Insurance money would not recover its intrinsic value. It's still an important market with one car being stolen in New Zealand every 18 minutes. http://bit.ly/2yOejOe

Then there were the kids. Dad, can I borrow the car? I'm just going to see a mate. Snitch allowed you to see whether they were really going to see a mate, or perhaps taking your pride and joy to a boy racer meet, or going to a party where they might consume alcohol or worse and then want to drive. Snitch allowed you to locate your vehicle and see the history of its travel including the location on a map with a breadcrumb trail and important things like speeding.

Plenty of good kids die young which was what my song One More Time Around the Block was about https://www.reverbnation.com/luigicappel/song/5358747-one-more-time-around-the-block ;

So this concept is a car that has a number of additional features built in including the ability to tell if the driver is under the influence of alcohol or drugs. It also enforces things like wearing a seat belt and driving at legal speeds. The Seat Leon has face recognition and iris tracking that can apparently sense the emotions of the driver and can send alerts to the parents or owners of the car.

Now it struck me that this might not be the most popular car for junior to want to borrow to go out with her friends, but behaving in your parent's' car is far better than not having access to one at all right? 

I'm not sure how popular this will be but it's a step in the right direction and the sort of capability that should be in all cars in the future. It is bound to save us from losing some lives needlessly. 
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GPS devices being placed in packages in Cuyahoga Falls to deter thieves

GPS devices being placed in packages in Cuyahoga Falls to deter thieves | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Thieves might want to think twice before swiping a package off the front porch of a home in Cuyahoga Falls.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Another example of using GPS to deter thieves. With more and more people buying things online and having them delivered, there is an increased risk of items left on people's doorsteps disappearing before the intended recipient gets home or knows it has been delivered.

Great as a deterrent and hopefully this will reduce temptation as would be crooks get the message in the mail. 
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Want a free ride? French cities opt for free public transport

Want a free ride? French cities opt for free public transport | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
To fight traffic congestion, pollution and other challenges that plague modern cities, an increasing number of French towns are choosing to make their public transport networks completely free.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Not everyone likes this intervention. The critics say that someone has to pay and the citizens end up paying one way or another, yet it has already grown to 15 towns in France, so it is no flash in la poele a frire. 

In this case it appears that councils are paying for the cost that was previously recovered in bus fares and the assumption is that it comes from rates or local taxes. 

I'm curious. If, as the article suggests, patronage is up significantly as are people visiting tourist attractions or hospitality venues and if more people are able to get to work, shouldn't all business make a small contribution rather than the rate payers. After all many of the people who work in or visit a town don't live there.

We always talk of the cost to GDP of traffic jams. If more people use public transport because it is free (and we do love free right?) and there are significant reductions in costs and barriers to the financial success of business and even the attractiveness of doing business in cities and towns with heavy traffic congestion during commute times, I'm curious if the GDP gains would be higher than the cost of the free transport. It would be great to see those numbers crushed and analysed like a Beaujolais nouveau.

We might be pleasantly surprised. Perhaps the increased productivity gains might leave some funds left over to support them.

So here's my question for you dear reader. If you had the choice of driving to work and paying all the associated costs, both in fuel, vehicle running costs, parking and sitting in congested traffic, or catching public transport, would you use it? 

If you had a choice between living somewhere where public transport was free or a city/town where it wasn't. Would you consider moving?
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Future of company car grows more and more questionable - FN50 2017 ICFM view

Future of company car grows more and more questionable - FN50 2017 ICFM view | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Allied to BIK tax rises and changes in employment demographics, the long-term future of the company car is questionable.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Will wider adoption of Uber, Lyft and other services create another unexpected change in what we take for granted? The huge number of company cars that only travel in urban areas that we have taken for granted for many years, could be at threat. 

Sure some people have to have them, but as more rideshare services are developed and if they are significantly cheaper than buying a company fleet that depreciates rapidly, requires management, maintenance, registration, tax, insurance, parking and much more, this could be an unexpected significant disruptor that I certainly didn't expect.

In my country, most new cars are sold (or leased) to companies, corporates and' Government departments. Most citizens buy used cars, typically imported used cars from Japan.

Fortunately we have no car manufacture or assembly plants in New Zealand, so that won't cost any jobs, but the new car distribution and service industry could be significantly compromised. 

If company car fleets drop dramatically, this could generate a significant improvement to traffic congestion and the roll on benefits. It could also reduce fuel consumption and the tax take, but perhaps the improvements in safety, congestion and wear and tear on the network will exceed that. 
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I’m stuffed If I’m Going to Get on that Tokyo Train

I’m stuffed If I’m Going to Get on that Tokyo Train | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
This brings back many memories of catching the train in Tokyo. I've been on most lines and this was classic morning rush hour. I remember about my 3rd trip I was catching a train to another part of the city to meet the manufacturer of touch screen pads we were looking to use to develop…
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I don't think they'd be allowed to do this today:)
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Did Russia make this ship disappear?

Did Russia make this ship disappear? | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Gurvan Le Meur was piloting the 37,500-tonne oil tanker Atria toward the Russian port of Novorossiysk when something odd happened. His ship disappeared.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This should be of real concern to all people who use, design or manufacture systems that rely on GPS. Obviously the main focus is for the military. It could be great if you could divert missiles and return them to the sender wouldn't it?

I wrote this story 4 years ago https://thefuturediaries.com/2013/04/19/boy-racers-make-sport-with-driverless-cars/ but if you took it a step farther and people could buy GPS spoofers, imagine what could happen to driverless cars! 

The story in 10 years time could easily read crashes galore as driverless cars in San Francisco lose the plot as cyber hackers spoofing their location awareness.

Of course the good news is that we have plenty of warning and therefore developers can create code saying something similar to the warning that we get whenever we hop in a car that has a GPS navigation system, effectively you have to drive based on what you see through your windscreen, not what the GPS tells you. The maps aren't guaranteed to be accurate or current. Check out these stories for examples of what has happened recently http://bit.ly/2y09ocD

In the same way, Deep Learning or whatever system the car uses to learn how to drive itself could defer to the LiDAR and say, if what the camera sees is not consistent with the GPS and map matching, then pull over and revert to the human driver. 

We can't say we weren't warned. 
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With cars tracking your driving habits, insurance industry changes lanes

With cars tracking your driving habits, insurance industry changes lanes | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The move toward rates based on individual behaviour may lower costs for some consumers but it raises privacy and other concerns
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Obviously Pay As You Drive or PAYD is less attractive to insurance companies because it reduces revenue, however, it also decreases risk, especially if the GPS tracking includes a gamified app that rates the quality of a person's driving as well as their distance. 

As  boutique companies enter the motor vehicle insurance market, they will force the hand of the giants, unless of course the giants decide to innovare themselves instead of allowing upstart disrupters to force their hands.

The problem for large companies is that their profits are bloated by people who drive safely and rarely claim against their policies. Of course we are in a growth market with more cars on  the road than ever so there are always new punters. 

If I led a large insurance company, I would introduce a subsidiary that offered PAYD options with a future focus of partnering with companies offering driverless cars or similar technology and be my own competitor, reaping the best from both worlds Then I would be able to target new car owners, baby boomers and business from my competitors without doing too much damage to my existing business. But alas for the car owner I'm not.

So what will happen here? Will an incumbent heed my advice and be smart, or will they stick to BAU or try to influence  legislation to block the unfairness of new companies who are going to eat into the profitability of their business, whilst giving customers a fair deal. 

Of course by tracking their customers there are other benefits. Smarter driving, people thinking about whether they need to drive at all and evidence to support their customers should they have an accident. In actual fact insurance like this could make the roads safer and even help reduce congestion. 

It may sound counterintuitive but it is potentially very good for the insurance companies, their customers and smart cities. 
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Cities realize they must fix the sorry state of buses

Cities realize they must fix the sorry state of buses | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Buses are increasingly slow, and unpopular. Some cities get how many problems that creates.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I like this story. If taxis are being disrupted by Uber and Lyft it is because the companies have lost touch with the customer insights. Customers are clearly telling them, they want to pay for someone to pick them up and they are happy to make a trade off over who provides the service.

Likewise people are happy to use public transport as long as it is effective and value for money. When public transport is slower than driving, people will drive. Priority bus lanes are an option as are smaller vehicles,that can take you to an express mode of public transport. 

So one of the questions for PT providers is whether they want to be in control of the transport services and optimise them for best outcomes, or allows third parties to do it for them, which reduces their investment. Will PT authorities listen to their customers and deliver or support services that do, or will they keep trying perhaps outdated modes, because that's what they understand? 

Gypsy cabs and new age rideshare services wouldn't exist if customers' needs were being met with traditional systems. 
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Honolulu bans texting while crossing road

Honolulu bans texting while crossing road | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Hawaii's largest city becomes the first worldwide to take the measure against "smartphone zombies".
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This sounds like the old Jaywalking Act and is a great idea. I think it will spread like the anti public smoking laws.

I was having a discussion over the weekend about how times have changed and a lot of new technological developments have resulted in changes to what we grew up with. Bike helmets, focus on seatbelts, smoking in public places are examples.
I learned the importance of this first hand when crossing the road at a traffic light controlled road intersection recently on my way to by lunch while at work. 

I trusted that people would stop for the red light and looked at my phone as I crossed. I was two thirds of the way across, so the lights had been red for at least 20 seconds when I felt the air from a car that raced through the intersection, centimeters from where I was crossing. The Doppler Effect mean I only heard it as it whooshed past. I won't do that again, it really unnerved me. Obviously he was as distracted as I was, except I trusted in the law to keep me safe.
We have all heard the stories and seen the outcomes of last year's Pokemon craze, which resulted in many accidents. I have no doubt that soon we will have more Augmented Reality mobiles on the way and while people may be looking through their phones they won't be looking from side to side.
Life was easier and safer before the advent of the mobile phone. I'm not ready to hand mine in, but I no longer look at it when I cross a road. 
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Are those 80,000 pound trucks tailgating each other? Soon it may be perfectly normal — and safe

Are those 80,000 pound trucks tailgating each other? Soon it may be perfectly normal — and safe | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
You soon may see “platoons” of 18-wheelers on U.S. highways in a bid to save on fuel.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I'm no scientist but my understanding of the physics of platooning is a little different from that described by the writer of this article. Maybe someone can help me with maths.

As I understand it, vehicles near, but not too close to the vehicle in front will experience turbulence, whereas depending on the type of vehicle, getting to the sweet spot puts the vehicle behind in a vacuum, which reduces wind resistance to the vehicle behind, effectively pulling it forward. 

The article says that this also benefits the vehicle in front. I don't understand that. Is that because it has less turbulent air behind it? Otherwise I would have thought that by creating the vacuum to the benefit of the vehicle behind, it would also create an attraction to the vehicle behind, therefore creating drag for itself as if the vehicle in front was almost towing the one behind. 

I thought that that was why in a peloton, the position of the front rider changes and they take turns doing the work. Can anyone set me straight?
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Elon Musk: The AI in Tesla's cars will be able to predict your destination

Elon Musk: The AI in Tesla's cars will be able to predict your destination | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Tesla CEO Elon Musk explained on Twitter that his self-driving cars will be able to predict your destination without you having to say a word.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This makes sense most of the time. My Galaxy already tells me how long it will take me to get to the destination in my calendar, even saying it will take me 30 seconds to get to my meeting in a cafe downstairs. 

However I found in Europe and the US there were many places with the same name and if you didn't pay attention when you entered a location in your nav, you could find yourself heading for the State Line.

I wouldn't argue with Elon though, because most of the places we go are the same. When I look at my Navdy app, the options that sit on the top are Work, Home, Airport and my mother-in-law's home. If it's a weekday morning, I'm probably going to work and if I'm at work I'm probably going home. In fact it's a stretch to call it AI, it's just basic logic. 

I'll get worried when the car says, I'm sorry Dave, I can't take you there.
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China will track its citizens' every move with a facial recognition system

China will track its citizens' every move with a facial recognition system | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
China has its sights set on a new technological achievement: developing a facial recognition system to visually identify 1.3 billion citizens nationwide.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is where Philip K Dick and George Orwell were pointing all those years ago and while there are benefits to being recognised, how far does it go before you start worrying about state control of citizens. 

I can see benefits to completing transactions, not having to fill out loads of forms, but what if you live in a country that restricts access to places for some people, or who may decide you are not towing the country line? What if your ideology is different, or perhaps your religious beliefs and your religion is banned? 

This may be a great technological achievement and could have a major impact on crime, or could it make criminals more savvy? Perhaps a good time to become a cosmetic surgeon. 

I think I prefer the concept of a Google Wallet and a sensor on my car that identifies the car for tolling, safety and other purposes. I'm happy to let a retailer, restaurant or attraction to know when I am in the neighbourhood if they have a promotion for me that is meaningful, via the location services on my smartphone loyalty program, but having the state able to monitor my every move  starts sounding scary and I live in a country that is generally benevolent to its citizens and it's unlikely to remove the freedoms I enjoy as a law abiding citizen. 

This would certainly put me off living in China. "As of this year, the country ranks 176th out of 180 countries listed in the World Press Freedom Index."
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You, your smartphone and the Big One: How to digitally prepare for the next big earthquake

You, your smartphone and the Big One: How to digitally prepare for the next big earthquake | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Some forward thinking and a few smartphone apps can be a valuable companion to navigate through a disaster and its aftermath.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
It has been a few years since the big earthquake in Christchurch, but Kiwis have been warned that the edge of the plate that connects us to Australia, which goes from the West Coast of the South Island, through part of Marlborough and then up through Wellington along the East Coast to Gisborne could harbour enough energy to weave a path of destruction such as we have never seen before at a scale as high as 8.4. https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/nz-earthquake/97652592/hidden-megathrust-fault-could-hammer-new-zealand-with-84-quake

While the article talks about being prepared with food, shelter, water and other essentials, communication is a big one and we rely heavily on cell towers which are at risk from loss of power and the network itself.

When I talk to people who went through the Christchurch earthquakes the biggest concern that many carry to this day is the inability to communicate with and reunite with family, friends and colleagues. 

Some of the apps in this article use very little cellular data and can operate on a reduced capacity network whilst others can form a mesh network and act like a walkie talkie in the absence of a cellular network, forming a mesh network.

If you live in an area that is a risk to earthquakes, and that is over half of New Zealand, it would be a good idea to check these apps out, together with your families. Apps like MyShake, Zello and Firechat might make the difference for you. The are all free and the great thing about an app, unlike some of your other emergency supplies, is not perishable, so you can set them up, tell your friends and family and get them to install them as well and then hope you never need them. But at least you'll be prepared. 

You might want to make sure you have a back up power pack for your phone. 
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Uber Open-Sources Its AI Programming Language, Encourages Autonomous Car Development

Uber Open-Sources Its AI Programming Language, Encourages Autonomous Car Development | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Uber, the popular ride sharing service, is moving to encourage AI research such as autonomous vehicle development by open-sourcing its own AI programming language, Pyro.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
My programming skills ended with Basic and a little Javascript, so I might need some help here. This is a great concept which could allow some of Uber's programing to be developed for free by enthusiasts. As Trump would say, "great people".

Open Streetmaps is an example of where this works really well, but when it comes to the code that controls a car that is taking me somewhere I have a little bit of a security concern.

What is the possibility of someone nefariously adding a back door to the vehicle's IS design or some other means of hacking vehicles? I can imagine all sorts of reasons people might do this from terrorism (why recruit someone to commit suicide when you can use a driverless car?), causing mayhem and chaos in big cities for other reasons such as committing crimes, or perhaps to remove a competitor. Maybe Uber Drivers who helped build the company and have now become redundant.What's to stop thieves and drug dealers using driverless cars to commit crimes? 

You could say I am being unrealistic, but just take a read of the first 3 pages of your daily newspaper and read small stories through to international politics and have another thought. 

I'm not suggesting it will happen, I'm just wondering if it could. 


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Redlands police made hundreds of arrests using GPS tracking devices, officials say

Redlands police made hundreds of arrests using GPS tracking devices, officials say | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The Redlands Police Department has made nearly 300 arrest since launching its GPS Tracker Program in 2011.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I'm of two minds here. Firstly congratulations to Redlands Police for an awesome initiative. I'd say the County Jail No Vacancy sign could be going up at this rate.

I absolutely love the idea of the Police lending GPS tracking devices to residents when they go on holiday, and I'd like to think an entrepreneurial company would see this as a great opportunity to partner with them to try to create a burglary free zone and show the benefit of GPS trackers.

This is such a great opportunity for people to help themselves. I challenge a GPS tracker manufacturer to come to the party and help this community become 

I do though wonder what a man who has been arrested 1,292 times is still doing on the street. That's almost every single day for 4 years. What is that costing in Police resources and community stress? 
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Self-driving bus involved in crash less than two hours after Las Vegas launch

Self-driving bus involved in crash less than two hours after Las Vegas launch | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A truck driver is blamed for the accident, but passengers say it could have been avoided if the autonomous vehicle had only reversed
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Look Ma No Driver. So the bus saw the truck coming and it's programming said that for the sake of safety, keep still. The collided. Would a human driver have done that? Probably not. They might have moved to avoid the collision, honked the horn, yelled and made hand gestures at the truck driver.

I think it would have been a brave person to go on the final two, perhaps face saving runs after that incident. Hopefully the program will change. Luckily noone was injured.
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Telecommuting most popular form of flexible working provision: survey

Telecommuting most popular form of flexible working provision: survey | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A vast majority (94 per cent) of U.S. employers provide some type of flexible working arrangement for their employees, according to a new survey by the International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans. Among the options, telecommuting is the most popular, with 74 per cent of respondents offering it. However, 60 per cent of those that offe
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Interesting that the research says it is in people's contracts, but there is at least a perception that 60% of the time employers don't suggest or discuss it with their staff until they are asked. 

My specific interest is in the impact of commuting on urban transport networks. Most of us who travel to work at peak times spend a lot of our lives sitting in congested traffic. That's dead time (on average more than the equivalent of 12 work weeks a year) and often leaves people stressed instead of fresh when they get to work.

Some positions require people to be at the office and many require at least most of the time in the office, but there are many available options including flexi-time, or even compressed work weeks. I'd love to do 10 hours a day four days a week. 

Not all companies believe in it. I remember when IBM thought they would save a lot of money by doing away with personal workspaces, replacing them with hot desks and teleworking. I had meetings with IBM staff at the time and they told me they loved the remote working but hated losing their personal office space, a double edged sword which resulted in many spending less and less time in the office. Now IBM has all but dropped it, while others are just starting.

Off course companies like IBM were pioneers and had great software systems like Notes and were early in Unified Communications. Since then we have learned a lot of lessons about the need to train people who work even part time from home both in productivity and meeting demands and expectations from family where it was not normal to be at home and working.

Barriers are mostly about finding a balance that works for teams, management meetings, being part of a group or as Maslow put it in his Pyramid Of Needs, where the third level was belonging. 

As Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi "call me Mike" a contemporary who outlived Maslow pointed out, humans are tribal animals who worked best in groups of around 45 people and gave the example of a military platoon as an optimal working group. We need to belong to a group. 

Just not all the time. There are times where I need to work on my own, away from the open plan office if I am going to get projects, reports or even reading done. The big thing to me is learning or being taught how to work from home with different competing demands for attention and win the trust, or ersatz trust through shared use of technology to continue to have a point of presence.

More and more people are working at least part of the time from home and each one who is off the road during peak times is not only increasing their productivity, but also that of their city. IMHO of course.
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Who’s Ready to Put Their Kid on a Self-Driving School Bus?

Who’s Ready to Put Their Kid on a Self-Driving School Bus? | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A provocative design concept from the studio Teague asks questions about burgeoning tech.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
It is interesting and maybe typical that the important new features that vehicle safety and security come to the education industry last. 
For a graduate profession, teachers are paid poorly given they hold our future in their hands.
I frequently hear stories today that they are finally putting GPS Fleet Management systems on buses, while other buses have had it for decades.
But here is the million dollar question. Will you trust Hannah, the driverless bus, with your children? This is pertinent to your own decisions about using autonomous vehicles yourself.
When I drive with my kids in the car, I consider them precious cargo, how about you? I am extra vigilant and focused when driving my children.
So assuming they come up with a solution to manage bullying and other problems that happen on school buses, would you put your kids in a driverless bus before or after you yourself are driven by an autonomous vehicle? 
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NMC to keep ‘watch’ on sanitary inspectors - Times of India

NMC to keep ‘watch’ on sanitary inspectors - Times of India | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Nagpur: The daily hassle of checking whether a sanitary worker in your locality has swept the road or not may soon end as Nagpur Municipal Corporation (NMC) will distribute GPS (global positioning system)-enabled wrist watches to its sanitary inspectors tracking their daily movement across localities.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I know it's a different world, but this appears like a serious case of big brother. GPS watches these days include accelerometers and won't just monitor whether people are at the location they are paid to work at, but will monitor their every movement. 

They will be able to see that one person has moved their arm 1,000 times in a day versus someone else who might only sweep 500 times.

Some years ago I was involved with a company that put GPS in their staff vehicles and whilst their motives were good, antennae ended up wrapped in aluminum foil very quickly. Those who were abusing the trust of their employers, picking up kids from school or other things that had become a lifestyle subsidized unwittingly by their employer quickly resigned and others showed themselves worthy of recognition and promotion potential. 

GPS on someone's wrist is very different to GPS in a vehicle and there appears to be no beneficial consideration for staff such as health and safety. 

I like to think that most people will do a fair job for a fair day's pay in the spirit of mutual respect. I have never been to India and I can't judge from this story, but initial impressions are that an employer wouldn't be able to do this in the West. 

How do you feel about this? Am I being unfair?
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How Well Does Video Conferencing Reduce Traffic Congestion? Japan Finds Out - VC Daily

How Well Does Video Conferencing Reduce Traffic Congestion? Japan Finds Out - VC Daily | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
How well does video conferencing reduce traffic congestion? Japan plans to find out by encouraging workers to stay home in 2020 to reduce Olympic congestion.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Japan is hoping to bring 40 million tourists into the country for the next Olympic Games. Seems unthinkable doesn't it? Tokyo, one of my favourite cities, has 9 million daily commuters just using its underground rail system and 127 million people working in or around the city! 

They are exploring the use of video conferencing to try to get a large number of people to work from home to see if they can free up space for the biggest potential tourist influx in their history.

If they could reduce the number of people using the Tokyo urban rail system by 10% during the games that's over three quarters of a million people a day.

The questions to me are of culture, training and work space in the home. Many of the Tokyo homes I have visited are small by Kiwi standards and fairly open plan. This means compromise if there are women and children needing to go about their daily lives. They need to be taught how to work together but still have the space they each need.

On the other hand, the offices I've been to in Japan are pretty much over-crowded, so they are used to working in busy spaces. 

The toughest thing to me is likely to be the loss of the office culture, because being a part of a company is very much a part of their daily lives and they are in the office a lot more than the average worker around the world. This could lead to reduced productivity through the interaction of tiered workers and perhaps even having to deal with office people separation anxiety.

If they can be taught how to make this work, it could have a huge impact on the country's ability to grow and thrive. To be successful, they will need a lot of people to train them in the way of remote working and psychological support for the workers and their families. If they are successful, the rest of the world can also learn a lot from them because this is a very significant tool in reducing traffic congestion.

In my opinion it is also a far better outcome than penalising people with congestion charges which is almost like punishing people because their employers and business groups haven't come up with better solutions. 

Of course a big difference in Japan to western countries is the percentage of population that already uses their public transport system, so in many cases the problems are different, for example in comparison to where I live and commute, where the big problem is the number of people going to work in single occupancy cars.
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License Plate Readers Help Police Nab Suspected Carjacker In Sausalito

License Plate Readers Help Police Nab Suspected Carjacker In Sausalito | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
License plate readers helped police catch a suspected carjacker. The cameras helped investigators, but they are prompting privacy concerns.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Some people see Number Plate Recognition cameras as an intrusion into people's lives, but others feel that they and their property are safer as a consequence.

In New Zealand, considered by Kiwis one of the safest countries in the world, on average around 2 cars are stolen a day. In Sausalito, NPR cameras are locating stolen cars, which are often indicated in other crimes as well as missing persons and persons of interest. They say these cameras also result in a reduction in crime. 

So what do you think? Is it an invasion of privacy or a necessary tool today. One in 10 Kiwis have had a car stolen according to a Colmar Brunton survey. The follow on costs in man hours, stress and insurance (and excess should make this a great investment. That's not counting catching speeding drivers.
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Map: Where You Don’t Want to Be- When It Hits the Fan

Map: Where You Don’t Want to Be- When It Hits the Fan | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
It’s a theory put forth by numerous survival and relocation specialists, and on
Luigi Cappel's insight:
It's a sad state of affairs, pardon the pun, but it seems that so often when we hear of a major event, like major fires, floods, storms and earthquakes, that within no time at all, while lots of people are seen showing bravery, helping out their fellow citizens, another lot is waiting to pounce and start looting. 

In some cases it is out of necessity, although decent people will ask for help like my grandmother did in the war, cycling for miles to get bread, eggs or something a bit more solid from farms sometimes dozens of kilometers from home, to feed her family.

This article talks about what could happen if there is an urban emergency and where the worst places are in the US that you might want to avoid in an emergency and yes it is the more densely populated counties. 

The worst case scenario they say is a city that has been without power for a week. It's almost enough to make some people want to go and buy a gun. Oh they already did....
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De Blasio introduces five-point plan to tackle NYC traffic congestion

De Blasio introduces five-point plan to tackle NYC traffic congestion | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
This includes restricting curbside access and greater NYPD enforcement, among other measures.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Interesting times. A year ago I attended a presentation saying what an amazing job they had done in NYC to reduce the congestion problem.

Now we read that Mayor de Blasio has a plan to reduce congestion, which we had been told was now sorted, while debating aggressively with Governor Cuomo who has been wanting to introduce a congestion tax, because de Blasio says it will unfairly impact people on lower incomes. 

It has been quite often that I seem to attend presentations or hear about solutions to urban traffic congestion, frequently ones like this which involve restrictions of access and greater policing. When are we going to see rewards for behaviour like cycling, walking, using public transport and remote working. 

How about tax reductions for companies that reduce their transport footprint by doing things like using teleworking to reduce their transport footprint by 5%. 
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Google's parent sends Internet balloons to reconnect Puerto Rico cell phones

Google's parent sends Internet balloons to reconnect Puerto Rico cell phones | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Two Project Loon balloons are hovering over Puerto Rico, giving some AT&T customers the ability to send texts and emails and get basic access to Web.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is a great story, one can only ask why it took them so long to work out. This is the perfect solution for earthquake and other emergency areas when telecommunications systems crash due to lack of power or other causes. 
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Uber and Lyft Are Cannibalizing Transit in Major American Cities

Uber and Lyft Are Cannibalizing Transit in Major American Cities | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Connecting people to information about how to improve walking, biking, and transit
Luigi Cappel's insight:
A survey of people in 7 cities around the US suggests that rather than reducing traffic congestion, rideshare services may be increasing traffic. 

Varying by city, respondents say that between 49% and 61% of people regularly using ride hailing services would previously have used public transport, walked or cycled. In some cases they wouldn't have made the trip at all, such as going out for drinks.
This can result in cannibalisation of public transit systems and whilst car ownership may be going down, the numbers of vehicles on the road might not. 

The research cites many reasons why people prefer not to use public transport including safety, not enough stops, not enough frequency, slow service and ironically full buses are amongst the reasons people prefer to use services like Uber and Lyft.

This risks creating a spiral where public transport services are reduced as they become less economic to run. 

Conclusions from the story "If cities and transit agencies don’t take action to improve the quality of bus and rail service, Uber and Lyft can end up doing more harm than good, clogging streets and cannibalizing transit."
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