Location Is Everywhere
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Location Is Everywhere
Location is Everywhere, How is it Changing our Lives? It affects everything in our daily lives. How do we manage it to live, work and play smarter?
Curated by Luigi Cappel
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How to Ensure You’re Buying the Perfect Home

How to Ensure You’re Buying the Perfect Home | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
For most people, buying a home is the biggest investment they'll make in their life. Not only is it a huge financial undertaking, but your final choice is a decision you'll be living with for the foreseeable future.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
If you haven't got the message from me yet, maybe someone else's words will resonate better. Do your homework before you make an offer!

What's the traffic like at rush hour? What's the neighbourhood like? Take a drive around all the neighbouring streets.

How does it match up to the prioritised list of 20 things you want in your house that match up with why you are buying a house? You did make one right?

How much fat are you allowing for things that go wrong in 6-12 months time? When the guttering leaks or the heating fails, do you have money left for emergencies or will you borrow to the max and have nothing to fall back on?

I love that they say what I have been saying so many times, knock on the neighbours doors and find out how compatible you are and get the real dirt on the area. It's in your mutual interest that you are happy there. I'll best most people you know have done nothing more than nod at the people checking you out as you visit the open home.

Want some more ideas? My new eBook The 5 Top Mistakes People Make When They Buy a House will be on Amazon in December for $38. Or you could get a PDF copy for free by going to www.firsthomebuyerstraining.com

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What do we ask a lawyer when buying a house? | Stuff.co.nz

What do we ask a lawyer when buying a house? | Stuff.co.nz | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
OPINION: We're buying a house but not sure what we need a lawyer for.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Kevin makes a very good point in this article about talking to your lawyer before buying a house. Many people don't talk to their lawyers until the last minute, some might not even think about the lawyer at all, because they are focused on finance, beating other people who might also be interested in the property and the million and one other factors that you are considering.

If it's your first house and your lawyer is experienced in property, he or she is probably one of the first people you should see. They are busy people and if you leave it until after you have made an offer, they might not be able to meet your deadlines and you could already have made some commitments that will cost you dearly.

Yes, lawyers are expensive, but your choice is the ambulance at the top of the cliff or the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff. You are signing a legally binding contract if your offer is accepted by the vendor. Get it wrong and you could find yourself in an expensive jam.

The way I've worked with my lawyer is that I catch up with him and let him know what I'm considering, that might be on the phone or in person. He then gives me advice on all the little hooks I need to be aware of, including as Kevin says in the article, any clauses I would need to include in the contract.

You might also want to consider things like whether you should own the house or whether it should go into a trust, so that you can look after your children in the future as beneficiaries. 

He will then assign a junior legal assistant or similar to work through the mechanics of the process and they will liaise with both of us. He knows what is going on and can oversee the process, but he doesn't have to do the legwork. That reduces the cost considerably, but still ensures that things will go smoothly.

Laws and council regulations change frequently so even if you have bought a property previously, don't assume you know it all. I'm a firm believer in doing what I'm good at and paying other people to do what they are good at. 

If you haven't caught up with my news, I have just published my latest eBook called 5 Top Mistakes People Make When Buying a House. You can get it for free at www.firsthomebuyerstraining.com or wait a few weeks and buy it from Amazon where it will probably sell for around US$38. 
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House Hunting in Auckland with the Barfoot & Thompson Real Estate App

House Hunting in Auckland with the Barfoot & Thompson Real Estate App | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
It's been 5 years since I last looked at the Barfoot & Thompson Real Estate App. I did a brief review of it back in 2013. That version was a finalist in the Designers Institute Best Designers Award and they continue to impress. Now I must say that I tried the new app on the…
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Virtual Reality glasses let you walk through Auckland houses for sale with the Barfoot & Thompson mobile app.

When I bought my VR Box glasses, I checked out a few demo apps, played around with some scenic views and then put them in the cupboard. I haven't looked at them for 6 months and then I noticed that the latest version of this app lets you take a VR walk through Auckland houses for sale and I had to get them out for a look.

It feels like Barfoots are the ASB of the Real Estate industry in Auckland with this app and as I often discuss,  today there is no excuse to be led around aimlessly from one property to the next, that you have no interest in. You can do some serious viewing and research from the comfort of your home and only go looking when you have lots of information. This app makes it easy.

Of course there are similar apps in other countries, but this one is in my city, so holds a little more interest for me. 
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Old me doesn’t need the house young me did

Old me doesn’t need the house young me did | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I always thought that smaller houses would have significantly less value than bigger houses, after all everyone seems to want 5-7 bedroom houses with 3 bathrooms going by the new suburb of Long Bay being developed a km away from my home.

But that seems to be changing and more Baby Boomers and Empty Nesters are looking to downsize and based on supply and demand economics, the more people that want smaller homes and the less that are available because so many people felt the same as me and built bigger homes, they are increasing in value.

After all, a house is worth what the highest bidder is prepared to pay for it, It's as simple as that.

After many months of writing and proofreading I have completed a FREE eBook called 5 Top Mistakes People Make When They Are Buying a House. If you or anyone you know are considering buying a house at the moment, this book could save you or them a lot of time and money. I'll give you a money back guarantee on the FREE book. 

Where to get it? Just go to www.firsthomebuyerstraining.com I welcome feedback. 
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Urban Planning Guru Says Driverless Cars Won’t Fix Congestion - The New York Times

Urban Planning Guru Says Driverless Cars Won’t Fix Congestion - The New York Times | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Tech companies claim that autonomous vehicles could reduce traffic. But skeptics argue that they’ll add to gridlock if people are still taking solo trips.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
People are always looking for technology to fix a problem. This is a good article and Peter Calthorpe is difficult to argue with. The big problem is single occupancy vehicles, not whether humans are driving them or not.

Once we have driverless vehicles at a critical mass, not only are we likely to have a similar number of cars with only one person in them, we will also see all sorts of disruptors launched where empty cars do pickups of goods and services as well as empty cars driving back home having dropped someone at work or school, because of availability and cost of parking.  

The total cost of ownership can also be much reduced if cars are powered by solar energy. The car can go home and recharge itself and be fully charged ready to arrive on time to pick up the owner again. If the owner isn't ready, the car would probably add to the traffic circling the pick up point if there was no handy free parking. Not a problem for the empty car, but a big problem for the people sitting in other cars driverless or not.

So autonomous cars would probably significantly increase the number of vehicles on the road at any given point in time. 

Those are just a couple of examples. I think I'm leaning towards the skeptic side of the debate, especially because new disruptive services that we haven't even thought of will exist once there are enough driverless cars on the road to sustain them. This may be another case perhaps, of technology not being the solution to the problem. It's never as simple as people think it is.

Often people look at a technology in isolation. A lot of people also only have a short term focus, especially those that haven't been around long enough to experience the consequences of other technologies. 

I mean, who would have thought 20 years ago that a large number of car crashes, injuries and fatalities would have been caused by people being on the phone. What people discussed was how great it was to be able to talk to people any time, anywhere. Then it was using apps to kill dead time (like while waiting at red traffic lights or stop start commuter traffic), for example listening to eBooks and podcasts. 

Who would have thought that lots of crashes happened because of Pokemon even 5 years ago. After all, everyone behind the wheel is a mature adult right? Otherwise they wouldn't be granted a drivers license. 

You still have to look hard to find an electric car on the road today. The majority of hybrid cars are taxis or seats for hire. So how can we even imagine much about the new disruptive things that will happen when autonomous cars reach critical mass, which could be 20 or 30 years from now. 

Think I'm wrong? Here are some facts. The first all electric Nissan Leaf cars were launched commercially on the market in 2010. We now have many brands of electric cars available. In September of this year, 8 years later, 10,000 electric cars have been registered in New Zealand. That is 0.25% of the 4 million cars in the country, 8 years after the first ones became available. That's almost a rounding error statistically. 

So why would the adoption of very expensive and yet unproven driverless cars be faster given the immense additional complexity of real time data required. After all electricity is just a power source. Autonomy requires massive computational power and high quality data and communications anywhere, all of the time.
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We shouldn’t market to people’s past — we need real-time, location-based strategies

We shouldn’t market to people’s past — we need real-time, location-based strategies | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
We need to stop marketing to people's past and realize that people's hobbies, interests, and lifestyles change as time goes on.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I often wonder how much money major brands waste on marketing to people who have already bought the item they are promoting. Whenever I buy something from an online retailer like AliExpress or Amazon, my Facebook and other media such as local newspaper apps through Google Play show me ads for the thing that I have already bought. It's too late, I've already got it. What an incredible waste of money!

Give me ads for something I am looking for right now or give me a mechanism to say what I am looking at, like the example in this article.

Proximity is great. But imagine if I purchased a present for a friend's child from a toy shop. Now I am near a toy shop and I start getting ads for toys. I'm actually not interested, it was a random purchase. I don't have young kids. 

If however a location based system had smart algorithms that knows that I go to, or check-in to a location regularly, then by all means offer me deals based on the trend. 

Offer me a genuine loyalty program with proximity based deals. I notice since I have stopped driving because of my back injury,  Mobil has stopped sending me marketing messages even though I am a member of Mobil Smiles. They don't know why I have stopped using their card. That's the other extreme, I could be going somewhere else for petrol for all they know. Odds are that I haven't gone to an EV, just based on Electric Vehicle sales vs petrol and diesel.

So many  companies just get sucked into simple thoughtless 'loyalty programs' that do nothing to induce customers to buy from them. The winners are the ad agencies, the delivery companies, virtual and physical. Not the advertiser nor the customer. 

Using web history that I was looking at LED torches online last week, doesn't mean that I want more. I probably bought one at the time, when I had a need.

The advertiser gets told that their ad for torches got 3,000 views today. If 2,900 of them were to people that have already bought, at best it is a waste of money, but their brand still gets seen. At worst, it annoys people so they will develop negative emotions towards  that brand.

If I frequently go to a retailer, like when I was driving, I used to often go to Super Cheap Auto. Offer me a deal when I'm within a kilometer of the store. 

There's a good possibility that a free bag off microfibre cloth offcuts will get me to buy polish, car wash, tyre black or other things because I am close by, even if I don't need them right now. 

That's using location and being smart, especially given I am a loyalty program member. The ROI would probably be 10x that of the junk mail, even if that is subsidised or paid for by the brands. 

It's not rocket science, but it's not how retailers think. The most frustrating thing is I've been saying this for over 10 years and when people finally start doing it and it works, they'll be saying "Why didn't we think of this before?"
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What UK property professionals can learn from the Nordics

What UK property professionals can learn from the Nordics | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
With a whole raft of digital advances not only creeping in to UK industry but actually permeating through the very core of business processes, Ville Read More
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is all very true but it only tells half of the story. It's all very well for a real estate firm to have all the apps, websites, AI, chatbots and more, but the success is limited by the widespread usage and adoption of the technology by the agents themselves.

There is a people problem in the industry when it comes to this adoption and one of the reasons is that so many agents are part time, casual just not very technologically astute. I've been told that 90% of the top sales are made by 5% of the agents. Those agents will probably have personal coaches and will use every technology available to them. Not only will they learn about the tools, but they will have a strategy to make sure they are used to the fullest extent. 

Savvy house hunters (and there aren't many which is possibly fortunate for those agents who do not get into the game) will seek out those people and will see by the quality of their listings and their accessibility that they are consistent.

With today's technology, a home buyer should be able to come up with a shortlist of properties that meets their expectations, including video walkthroughs, plans, permits, information about the locality and much more from the comfort of their home or wherever they have their mobile as more apps become responsive. 

Then they can contact the agent and not be shown lots of properties that don't meet their criteria.Home buyers and real estate agents won't have to work so hard, a lot of time and money will be saved and the vendor who lists with one of the tech savvy realtors is likely to have a shorter wait for the sale of their property.

If Real Estate Agents don't embrace these technologies throughout their organisations, then more and more people will go to Zillow or other sites or even new sites opening up where people are able to sell their own home directly. 
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Dangerous child sex offenders to wear tracking devices for life under Queensland law change - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Dangerous child sex offenders to wear tracking devices for life under Queensland law change - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The Queensland Government is about to introduce amendments to allow dangerous and repeat child sexual offenders to be tracked for life, in response to a Supreme Court ruling to release notorious sex offender Robert John Fardon unmonitored into the community.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
It's always about the hardware. Systems like this can prove that a suspect or offender is or was at the scene of a crime, but using the data to prevent a crime is complex and rarely where the money and time is spent. It's great to get convictions after the crime has been committed, but what about the poor children and their families and focusing on prevention.

Knowledge based systems combining AI with geofences, learning about places where these people congregate and associate with similar criminals can make a significant difference. Monitoring the patterns of groups of offenders would very quickly create a powerful database. The technology is already being used in other industries. 

I would hope that systems like this aren't put together in isolation. They should be integrated country-wide. They don't have to be the same brands of technology, in fact they shouldn't, but they should be interoperable.

Technology itself doesn't solve these problems and the long term focus needs to be on prevention rather than cure. 

Some years ago a failed startup GPS system was set up to support people who might get themselves lost or need help, for example people on wheelchairs, vision impaired etc. They were able to summon a buddy or contact emergency services with the click of a button. 

If a sex offender were to find themselves within a geofence such as a perimeter of maybe half a mile around the school, the principal's office should be advised immediately as should the police. How often do we read about children being enticed into vehicles within yards of schools?


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With home buying process to be made simpler with robots, will property agents be phased out? | The Independent

With home buying process to be made simpler with robots, will property agents be phased out? | The Independent | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Latest Singapore News and Headlines, Top Stories and Alternative Perspectives.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I added this story only because it has a fantastic headline and no substance relative to it.

Apps that help with mortgage calculation to see how much you can borrow have been around for years as have video views.

Just one thought on using an AI to help people buy property, without using Real Estate Agents, a large percentage of properties wouldn't even get looked at, because they would fail on matching criteria of what buyers are looking for. 

Buying a house (or even commercial property) is an emotional decision. While an AI could be used to narrow down properties to view, it can't match the relationship and mediation between a buyer and a vendor. You can't compare that to a buy or sell order when a stock or currency reaches a certain level.

Great headline though....
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Fishing vessels offered rebate for tracking devices

Fishing vessels offered rebate for tracking devices | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The State Govt will offer up to $970 in rebates for the purchase and installation of approved vessel tracking units.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is a great idea, but it is only as good as the way it is monitored.

Several years ago I consulted to and supplied GPS tracking with route optimization for several hundred vehicles in the service industry. It was not about Big Brother, but about better managing the workload and being competitive in the market.

Within 2 weeks, certain vehicles started disappearing off the radar, they were not visible on the map, and some missing people  happened to be ones that Area Managers had been wondering about. I had my suspicions and at zero notice we had dispatch request vehicles to go to the auto electrician workshop where the systems had been installed immediately as they needed a software upgrade.

As I expected, the GPS antennas, hidden under the dashboard were wrapped in aluminium foil, their ability to communicate effectively blocked. The drivers of course had no knowledge of how that could have happened. This was interesting because they were permanently assigned to their vehicles, they weren't pool vans.

The same happened a few more times with the same result, so word had got around that this was how to go pick up the kids after school, go shopping or other things that were not work related in work time and not get caught. If they had been a bit brighter, they would have removed the foil as soon as they had made their non business visits, but we were too quick for them and some were just not very smart.

My guess is that if these systems are mandatory, the same thing will happen when fishing boats go to locations where it is illegal to fish. They will go off the radar, chances are no one will be any the wiser and when they are back in legal fishing grounds, their signal will appear again. 

It's a similar story with GPS anklets for offenders on bail or home detention. So often they are caught, not because there was no alert or alarm activation when they left their home or location, but after the event, when their anklet was proven to be at the scene of a new crime as the software created breadcrumb tracks on maps showing where they had been and when. The criminals were too thick or too desperate to think about being able to be tracked. 

Often Police or their agencies didn't have the budget to set up more sophisticated systems that would set of alarms whenever the person wearing the anklet was outside of their geofence so that they could be caught before they committed crimes, rather than afterwards.

I was interviewed on national radio after one such event and asked what the problem was with the GPS anklet technology. My answer was that there was nothing wrong with the technology. The systems were simply not in place to monitor alarm activation. 24-7 monitoring was not taking place.

I hope that the Queensland Government ensures that monitoring systems are in place and that swift action is taken by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority GBRMPA, Coastguard or whoever is responsible for monitoring infringements. 

Artificial Intelligence AI and machine learning systems combined with known suspects will allow for targeting of potential offenders. This knowledge is not widespread and confined to a small number of industry segments and players. 

With the right systems in place, offenders can be quickly caught and punishments such as impounding boats would very quickly reduce offending. I will be very impressed if these mitigation's have been budgeted for and put into place. Typically these solutions are based around hardware and the hardware is the simple part of the solution. It's the intelligence and resource applied to the technology that makes it effective.
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Interactive floor plans, virtual renovation tools: Barfoot & Thompson shakes up real estate market

Interactive floor plans, virtual renovation tools: Barfoot & Thompson shakes up real estate market | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Prospective buyers can ‘mentally move in’ and even ‘virtually renovate’ their next home...
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Barfoot & Thompson have long been innovators in Real Estate in New Zealand and this new service and application is going to be a real winner with home buyers.

They demonstrate their new Diakrit web app at this property https://www.barfoot.co.nz/758211 which features 360 views of locations that are almost like Google Street View but of the house. The only disappointing aspect for me was that I could not walk from room to room in the way you can walk down a street using Google's service, but I don't want to detract from a great service.

I've advised people to take panorama views of houses they are interested in. In this case Barfoot's do it for you, but not for every room, I guess they want to showcase the best bits. 

Another feature, similar to something that Resene Paint did a few years ago, is allow you to instantly visualize the house with different color palettes right down to cupboards, tiles and other elements. 

The challenge I have found with services like this, including Barfoot's own app in the past is that it requires an investment from the vendor to add the service, which I'm sure isn't free and for the Real Estate Agent to encourage vendors to use it and to then promote the feature. With the old app I found some Agents had many houses featured, while others might have only one or none at all.

If I was a Real Estate Agent, I'd probably also collaborate on deals with staging companies to make these panoramas look a million bucks. Even better I would also look at using Augmented Reality apps so that people can really visualize rooms with different furniture and fixtures, all technology that has been around for 5-10 years.

Anyway, Congratulations to Barfoot & Thompson  for continuing to innovate and for the recognition for ICT innovation. 
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Buying a Starter Home

Buying a Starter Home | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Tips for home buyers who are trying to find a starter home, and reasons why purchasing a starter home makes financial sense for most people.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Good advice in this article. So many people say it is impossible for young people to buy their first house. It's not easy, but it hasn't been easy in my lifetime.

One of the challenges is that people want a house like their parents have, perhaps conveniently forgetting that their parents probably had a 'starter house'. They might not even remember it.

One of my kids was even a little embarrassed and snobby about the area that we bought our first house in, the area we lived in when she was born. We didn't have any choice if we wanted to get our first step onto the property ladder and we were paying 18% interest! 

It did appreciate quite quickly, again as per this article, which was just as well because for the first few years we were barely touching the principal of the loan. That gave us the ability to buy in a better area a few years later. 

Unless you are born with a silver spoon, or earn a huge income, you have to start somewhere and this article provides some things that are worth considering before taking the leap, probably long before taking the leap. 
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A Tech Company Wants to Implant GPS Trackers in Dementia Patients

A Tech Company Wants to Implant GPS Trackers in Dementia Patients | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A Wisconsin vending machine company is developing a GPS implant for people suffering from Alzheimer's disease and dementia.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I like the sentiment, but there seems to be a fatal flaw here. besides the fact that you have to cut it out of the mostly elderly dementia sufferer every 6 months to replace the battery, this implant only emits a radio signal.

External devices using similar technology can only be tracked by SAR people using portable YAGI directional antenna. That means they have to be pointing in the right direction to find the person and they have to be within at best, a km within line of sight and no significant metal objects between them.

The problem is that many people are already beyond the range of the Search and rescue people by the time the dementia patient has been identified as missing and with or without these systems, this can involve many people looking for each individual who has wandered off.

I have done considerable research in this space and whilst this concept some of the fatal flaws in GPS systems, particularly the size to accommodate batteries that need to be charged at best every couple of days, circuitry and a SIM card, and the fact that often dementia patients refuse to wear a bracelet, necklace or watch they don't relate to, they are of limited value unless there is something this company has not shared.


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Property Brothers: Don't make 3 renovation mistakes homeowners regret

Property Brothers: Don't make 3 renovation mistakes homeowners regret | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Drew and Jonathan Scott, hosts of the HGTV show "Property Brothers," share some of the biggest home renovation mistakes buyers make and how to avoid them.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Buyers remorse. Have you heard of it? According to this story around 34% of Baby Boomers experience it and double that amount of millennials, almost 70% feel this. Is that scary or what?

It's not that they are necessarily sorry they bought a house, although it may feel that way to them. But they made mistakes and those mistakes can be very costly.

That's why I wrote the book 5 Top Mistakes People Make When They Buy a House. The book will be launching on Amazon in a few weeks for around US$38. You could wait and buy it for Christmas, or you get a FREE PDF of the book now at www.firsthomebuyerstraining.com 

Buying a home in my humble opinion is something that everyone should aim to do and the sooner the better, but you need to be smart and get it right, first time. 
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Waste management issues bugging you? Know how can you solve with GPS

Waste management issues bugging you? Know how can you solve with GPS | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Today GPS technology is not just limited to tracking the exact location of vehicles or find different routes but can be extensively used in waste management.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
When I read this headline I was thinking about how in some countries it's quite normal to illegally dump garbage and where domestic recycled rubbish doesn't get recycled. Putting a PGS detector into a sealed plastic container for example, might be an idea to see where less scrupulous operators dump their waste to save on time or perhaps dumping fees..

I recently bought a $14 rechargeable GPS Tracker for my Corvette on AliExpress, which I have yet to test because it requires a full sized SIM card and I only have a micro SIM, but it was way cheaper than any fitted product and most of the time my car is securely in a car park, and because I already use the OBD2 port for my Navdy.

But what got me excited about the article was a mobile app called Black Spot Mobile Application in the state of Goa in India which allows people to identify the sites of illegal dumps of rubbish so they can subsequently be cleared.

There are probably public apps around the world that do that. There are lazy, thoughtless people all over the world and yes even in clean green New Zealand, who feel that if you can get away with it, it is OK to dump all your rubbish over the side of banks off highways and country roads.

Often people spot them as they drive, or stop for lunch and a free app that lets people report waste using the GPS in their mobile phone would be great in the same way as they tell Waze and Google that there has been a motor accident, a traffic jam, or the location of a speed camera (not such a fan of that last feature), it's a bit like a radar detector, if you weren't going to break the law, you wouldn't need one.


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Seattle's 'Amageddon' crisis should terrify the city Amazon chooses for HQ2

Seattle's 'Amageddon' crisis should terrify the city Amazon chooses for HQ2 | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Amazon has been blamed for Seattle's astronomical hikes in real estate costs, traffic gridlock, and homelessness.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is really interesting and something I hadn't really considered, but it appears that having Amazon in your city could mean increased traffic congestion, increased real estate costs and trouble surviving for local retailers.

I wonder if Melbourne is going to experience any of this with the establishment of a major warehouse that will deliver product to Australia and New Zealand. The sheer volume of freight between freight hubs including to and from international and domestic airports alone will be huge and could add to traffic congestion.

In Seattle the average commuter now spends 55 hours a week in traffic. If you consider you work a 40 hour week, that's double the time you are away from home.

Could be a good time to buy real estate in Melbourne right now if that is also going to be a business hub. Maybe some capital gain in the wind, if they don't tax it off you. I don't know what the laws are over there. 

Whatever happens, it is going to be really interesting. A quick Google search suggests that what was expected and promoted in Seattle is pretty much word for word what what suggested in Melbourne https://bit.ly/2F6rZvE. ;
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Location is top factor for job hunters faced with steep housing costs | CBC News

Location is top factor for job hunters faced with steep housing costs | CBC News | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Sky-high real estate prices are making location-based career decisions increasingly common.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Location is so important today when it comes to matching where you live with where you work. It has become a major dilemma for people in Canada and is the same in many other countries.

People starting out in their careers, people studying, people in service industries on or near minimum wages are critical to the life-blood of any city or town. If they can't afford to buy in the area they work in, sooner or later they are either going to be looking for remote telecommuting work or another town.

The problem is that cities need someone for every job, whether it is cleaning tables in a food court or leading a management team in a large corporate or Government department. 

I've heard people talking about property slumps but population keeps growing and people have to live somewhere. I'm hearing many people say they are happy moving to smaller towns and doing less skilled work in return for lower costs and improved lifestyles. That is a huge loss to businesses, especially the Baby Boomers who have so much business and life experience.

Some years ago (and it wouldn't have been for me anyway) I thought to myself that storage facilities would be a great business to be in, with so many people downsizing their homes but not wanting to part with their treasures. I still believe that but it would bore me to tears. 

I predict a next boom growth sector ripe for investment and franchising will be work hubs in smaller towns and outer suburbs, with serviced, shared office spaces, computers, meeting rooms, high speed internet, video conferencing and social eating and networking spaces will be huge. Again, it's not for me, but what a great way for small business and large business to collaborate. 

I believe that companies that can employ remote workers are going to find it easier to get key people working for them. However a lot of people also need the social contact of working with other people and being able to share resources. 

Urban businesses such as hospitality are going to struggle to survive, like the Vancouver bagel shop in this article that had to close for weeks because people couldn't afford to live near the shop and work for low wages.

The research in this article is really interesting and something that town planners and companies are going to have to consider. They found that 68% of people surveyed were influenced in their employment decisions based on location. 
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Survey: 52% of millennials want to buy home in next two years

Survey: 52% of millennials want to buy home in next two years | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Buyers appear undeterred by the lack of inventory and rising home prices. Search the latest Fall House Hunt listings at realestate.boston.com.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I was reading a lengthy full page advertisement in Auckland's Channel Magazine https://bit.ly/2JfI7tg by Geraldine Zareian a REal Estate Agent from Barfoot & Thompson which didn't mention millennials specifically but suggested a significant increase in property prices and also potentially interest rates post 2020. 

Interesting that I remembered it because I felt that it had too much information for a single ad, even in a full page, but on the other hand, the information was valuable.

She also wrote an article which has only been published online at this stage about the relevance of what is happening in other parts of the world. 

When it comes to trends, it would make sense if millennials in the US decide that buying property is on their priority list, chances are that this will become a phenomenon in a wider region.

The main difference that I see in New Zealand is that in many areas our real estate is much more expensive than buying properties in many US cities, which is crazy. It's not showing any signs of letting up that I can see. 

Even in small towns, baby boomers leaving the city are raising regional prices because they have greater buying power because of the high value of properties they are selling.

I think that as long as you are buying for the long term and confident that you will not be selling for several years, then any time is a good time. Whilst there are short term drops in prices, they still seem to pretty much double every 10 years. 
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Why Do Real Estate Agents Take You to Houses You Don’t Want? Could it be You?

Why Do Real Estate Agents Take You to Houses You Don’t Want? Could it be You? | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Why are you looking to buy a house? Is it an investment for the future? Are you getting married? Are you planning to have children or perhaps already have some? Are you really clear on what you want? Whether you are or aren't clear, there will be some important factors and if you can't explain…
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Time is limited and the cost of travel growing increasingly. I wonder how often an Agent helps a buyer fine tune why they are looking at houses and what features matter to them?
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MIT built a health-tracking sensor that can ‘see’ through walls

MIT built a health-tracking sensor that can ‘see’ through walls | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
An MIT professor has built a prototype device that can wirelessly track your health -- even through walls -- using a mix of radio signals and machin
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Could this help prevent outbreaks of Bird Flu? Did you know that Bird Flu is still around and in some countries in virulent forms? There are currently known cases of Bird Flu in California, in Bulgaria, Russia and Malaysia to name a few places. 

This technology which is currently on trial in 200 homes could be a game changer in many industries.

For example, rest homes and retirement villages could use technology like this to monitor the health and safety of ageing people.

It could be added to technologies being trialed or used in airports.

I was watching CNN recently and an 'expert' was saying that it was only a matter of time before the next pandemic hits. 

It is currently almost impossible to track people at risk, groups of people that arrive at an airport, although they do get lucky, for example when a large number of passengers are all coughing or showing flu symptoms after a long flight.

Easy access to international travel means that people with highly contagious diseases like Bird Flu could spread them very quickly. Using this technology at airports could potentially save countless lives by identifying and quarantining potential patients who display measurable symptoms.. 
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App gives Ohio State students peace of mind after several crime alerts

App gives Ohio State students peace of mind after several crime alerts | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
In the short time school has been in session, the Ohio State University has issued several crime alerts. Now, to add a level of security, the university is launching a new app on campus. The app, similar to a mobile blue emergency light, makes sure no one has to walk on campus alone. For some Ohio State students, walking alone on campus can be a frightening thought.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
It's very hard for this Kiwi to imagine a campus where it is potentially dangerous to walk around alone. I like the concept though and this could be used in other environments too.

For example there have been apps used in various US districts where parents have GPS access using an app to see where the school bus is that they are meeting.

There are of course free apps that people can use with friends and family, but most people find these a bit creepy and don't want to use them. 

The ability to report an incident is a good feature. I wonder if they have considered the other features of the phone. One of the things that I often forget when I see an incident, for example a bunch of cars running a red light, I ask myself why I didn't think of catching them on video. Capturing the GPS location of the phone is obviously part of this app.

Wouldn't it be cool for a safety feature, for example if someone is being attacked or harassed, that the microphone and camera are automatically activated and what is being filmed and recorded is being sent to the friend and could also be sent to local security or police in the same way as Facebook Live and other apps do, such that it can only be stopped with a password or fingerprint?

It would also dramatically reduce the number of phones that get stolen because they can easily be turned into cash.  
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Suffolk DA: Riverhead man on probation traced to 10 burglaries by GPS monitoring ankle bracelet

Suffolk DA: Riverhead man on probation traced to 10 burglaries by GPS monitoring ankle bracelet | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A Riverhead man is facing multiple felony burglary charges in connection with 10 burglaries of homes in Riverhead in 2017 and 2018 — while wearing a GPS ankle bracelet as a condition of his probation on a prior conviction.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is exactly what I was talking about in my previous post about tracking fishing vessels illegally fishing in the Great Barrier Marine Reserve.

This person is being charged for 10 home burglaries while wearing a GPS ankle bracelet. How come they didn't catch him on the first burglary or when he left the geofence around his home? 

Yes it is great that they caught him, but 10 families are probably highly stressed and emotionally distraught after what he did.

With today's technology, an alarm can be activated as soon as the wearer leaves the geofence, which is basically a virtual line placed around his home, or perhaps farther if he is allowed to go to a place of work. 

I have no idea of the technology that they are using in Suffolk County, but I do know that software can generate alerts that can reduce this offending. What's the point of allowing people to have home detention while on probation on the condition of using GPS anklets if they are not monitored 24:7?

You could site cost, but what was the cost of the 10 burglaries, the officers who had to visit all the crime scenes, interview victims, arrest the felon,. build the case and prepare for court?
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Can Gamifying Public Transit Change Commuters' Habits?

Can Gamifying Public Transit Change Commuters' Habits? | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Old habits die hard, but researchers think with the right incentives, those who drive will get into the habit of taking public transit instead.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
People love games and they hate big sticks. This new AI based app Incentrip currently being trialed by 35,000 users in Washington DC and Baltimore, learns about your behaviour and also understands the transport options based on your planned trips.

The greener your trip, the more points you earn and it doesn't take long to earn an Amazon or other $50 gift card.

Doesn't that sound better than congestion tolling, especially in areas where people have few options? People love rewards and recognition. 

I hope they go a step further with this (pun intended) and combine it with other concepts, for example setting up teams, or competition among friends, family, colleagues or members of clubs or associations. 

At a conference I attended a couple of years ago, eRoad, a Fleet Management company shared how they have a safety system where people earn or lose points based on safe driving. It's not even about prizes or physical rewards as most people involved in gamification understand, its about appealing to our competitive nature and having bragging rights. Gaining or losing position on a ladder is huge. 

We are all inherently competitive whether it is against our own efforts or beating other people, that's why sport is so popular. Imagine getting the most points in your company, in your suburb or neighborhood. I'm sure many brands would get on board with something like this to be seen as good corporate citizens.

It could also be combined with programs such as 10,000 steps, which would be impossible to achieve if you drive your car to work, but could involve combinations of walking and public transport. We could even see health improvements as people get off a stop or two early and walk a little farther. 

Everyone benefits and ultimately the transport system benefits while citizens have fun doing it. Consider this versus paying a congestion tax that is a grudge payment. 

Campaigns such as those removing plastic bags from supermarkets are meeting phenomenal support from customers. We all want to do the right thing, but we also like to feel that we are doing so of our own volition. We also like recognition. 
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Work two jobs to buy a house says Real Estate Institute of Australia president Malcolm Gunning

Work two jobs to buy a house says Real Estate Institute of Australia president Malcolm Gunning | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A REAL estate lobbyist has offered some brutal advice to Australians struggling to buy a home which did not go down well on social media.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This won't be welcome advice for people who want to be first home buyers, but if you are serious about owning your own home, it might be something you want to consider.

I don't believe that people can't get the deposit and buy a house. It comes down to WHY you want it and HOW BADLY you want it. It might not be where you initially want to live, but you need to start somewhere. 

It's something you hear about in the US all the time but closer to home its an inconvenient truth too. I am seeing two types of people at the moment. One who say its just too hard to own a house and another that are working multiple jobs and are determined to make it happen. 

The irony is that it seems that often it is those that come from tough backgrounds who succeed because they want a better life for their families and those who don't sometimes come from middle class comfortable families where they have had an easy childhood, living in a nice neighborhood, with all the bells and whistles that come from it. Maybe they have a sense of entitlement. 

In a nutshell, the way I see it is that if you say you can, or you say you can't, you're right.

I have a serious back injury at the moment that is keeping me from work and I also can't drive until my condition improves. ACC Insurance is paying for me to get to and from physio and specialist appointments and I have chosen to use Uber to get me around because its cheaper than taxis, even though it's not directly my money.

Every time I get in I ask the driver if that is what they are doing full time and almost all of them are saying this is what they do before and after their other job. Often they are people with young families or wanting to start a family and the only way they can get a deposit is by driving for Uber as well. Effectively having two jobs.

The benefits are that they can get in their car and work whenever they have time. Within legal restrictions on driving they can work any time. 


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How to Cope With the Stress of Buying a Home

How to Cope With the Stress of Buying a Home | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

Buying a home can be a stressful process, but it doesn't have to be. A good agent can help alleviate your anxiety during this big decision.

Luigi Cappel's insight:
Good article. Once you've made an offer you are financially and more importantly emotionally involved and its hard to relax and wait. 

Sometimes you wait overnight, sometimes you might have to wait even longer. Knowing that this is going to happen, it is a good idea to have plans on how to distract yourself.

Plan ahead so you can relax and like a good poker player, have strategies in mind based on what you think the vendor will do and how you will respond based on whether they accept your offer or come back with a counter, then you won't be surprised either way and will be able to respond intellectually instead of emotionally.

Have you been in this situation? Were you prepared? Have you been in that situation more than once and still been unprepared?
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